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Journal Article
World Policy Journal (1 June 2001) 18 (2): 55–64.
Published: 01 June 2001
... (Phanar) district overlook­ Orthodox Christian subjects. Even amid ing the Golden Horn. The front gate was the slow collapse of the empire— from eco­ painted fire-engine red. Inside, the pastels nomic torpor and secessionist violence in on the molded ceiling and pillars looked as its Balkan provinces...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (1 December 2011) 28 (4): 20–33.
Published: 01 December 2011
... Orthodox Christians confronts daily challenges from the Islamic nation that surrounds them. We’ve asked writers in each of these nations to define the fault lines and help us understand the dynamics at work. Caracas—Monday morning starts like any other. Traffic is still light through Avenida...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (1 December 2017) 34 (4): 87–92.
Published: 01 December 2017
... far-right factions under a single umbrella. Founded in 2012 and headed by Prokhanov, the Club is a self-described “intellectual circle”—a group of 47 philosophers, criminologists, journalists, businessmen, and even Orthodox bishops dedicated to promoting revanchist notions of Russian superiority...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (1 March 2013) 30 (1): 105–114.
Published: 01 March 2013
... the Catholic, Anglican, or Orthodox Church. Today, Pentecostalism is presenting Christians, especially young ones, with a choice. If established Christianity is an iPhone, offering one color and one screen size, then Pentecostalism is Android, offering every variation from the mega-church experience...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (1 March 2018) 35 (1): 40–41.
Published: 01 March 2018
... 1922 1991 Formation of the Soviet Union Dissolution of the Soviet Union ST. PETERSBURG, RUSSIA During the Soviet era, the Russian Orthodox Cathedral was converted into a pro- Marxist museum about atheism...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (1 December 2011) 28 (4): 1–2.
Published: 01 December 2011
.... Our Map Room zooms in on the hajj, tracing it through the holy city of Mecca. We then turn to three fault lines of religion—where conflicting passions and agendas have opened up gulfs between religion and government—the Jews of Venezuela, Christians of China, and the Orthodox of Islamic Turkey. Next...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (1 December 2002) 18 (4): 51–58.
Published: 01 December 2002
... Goftar, an Iranian scholar attached to the (Sunni Islam and Eastern Orthodox Chris­ Qom Theological Seminary’s Center for Cul­ tianity) are legally permitted to open and tural Studies, points out that every regime maintain houses of worship, distribute reli­ is constructed on a “series of solid...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (1 June 2001) 18 (2): 43–53.
Published: 01 June 2001
... of what had taken Muslim mosque, Roman Catholic cathedral, place and the consciousness that what has once Christian Orthodox church and Jewish syna­ been can be again; there remained too hope, a gogue. The people of Sarajevo— Muslims, senseless hope, that of the downtrodden. Serbs...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (1 June 2001) 18 (2): 89–92.
Published: 01 June 2001
... subsequently enabled Stalin to acquire supreme power, outwitting his better educated and more worldly Bolshevik rivals. The absolutism persists. In early May, adherents of Georgia’s Orthodox Church, armed with nail-studded clubs, broke up a meeting of Jehovah’s Witnesses, while police, according to...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (1 March 2005) 22 (1): 103–107.
Published: 01 March 2005
... by either Cross or Crescent. The frontiers between East and West, between Islam and Christianity, and between the Orthodox and Latin faiths, were all demarcated centuries ago through holy wars. We commonly forget how many, and how bloody, these wars were. We may remember that there were eight...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (1 December 2004) 20 (4): 91–93.
Published: 01 December 2004
... town consisting of 400 roofless houses and the stark remains of a large Orthodox church. As a marker explains, with strenuous understatement, “Shortly after the proclamation of the Turkish Republic, the Greeks living in the region were exchanged with Turks living in western Thrace, which resulted...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (1 December 2005) 21 (4): 91–93.
Published: 01 December 2005
... reminiscent of the scandalous sack of Orthodox Christian Constantinople by Latin Christians during the Fourth Crusade. In Iraq’s case, however, the real culprits are not avaricious warriors but the buyers and sellers of undocu­ mented antiquities in a grey market that provides the essential incentive...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (1 March 2015) 32 (1): 3–11.
Published: 01 March 2015
... situation. A more orthodox policy includes reduction of subsidies, cuts in current expenditures, and rising taxes—to produce a minimum primary budget surplus required to stabilize the growth of public debt. President Dilma Rousseff correctly opted for a conservative economic policy in her second term. In so...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (1 December 2011) 28 (4): 7–13.
Published: 01 December 2011
... forms of religious revivals. Evangelicals are descendants of the Awakening movements that surged in the 18th century, and Muslim Salafis are heirs of the Wahhabi reform movement that arose in the same century (which also saw the birth of Jewish ultra-Orthodox Haredi movements). So when secularization...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (1 March 2017) 34 (1): 13–17.
Published: 01 March 2017
... a minority in a country of immigrants. He won the votes of only a quarter of eligible American voters, and his success gives a voice to the fear and frustrations of a minority, like WASP nationalism did a century ago, when its targets were the Catholic, Orthodox, and Jewish immigrants from Southern...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (1 March 2017) 34 (1): 42–46.
Published: 01 March 2017
... Sviatoslav’s father, the better-known Prince Volodymyr who converted Kievan Rus’ to Orthodox Christianity. They are the prototypical leaders of the eastern Slavs, which includes Ukrainians, Russians, and Belarusians. The seal was used to imbue documents with royal authority, but here it is giving this new...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (1 September 2005) 22 (3): 147–150.
Published: 01 September 2005
... conference, an event so unusual that their photo­ graph graced the March 31, 2005, front page of the New York Times. Present were Israel’s two chief rabbis, the patriarchs of the Roman Catholic, Greek Orthodox, and Armenian churches, and three senior Muslim prayer leaders. Shlomo Amar, Israel’s...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (1 March 2011) 28 (1): 73–82.
Published: 01 March 2011
...” isn't easy . The bones belong to victims of the wave of killings that hit Cyprus in July and August 1974, after an attempted coup d'état sparked fighting between the island's Greek-speaking Orthodox Christian majority and its Turkish-speaking Muslim minority. Amid violence triggered by the Greek...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (1 June 2013) 30 (2): 70–79.
Published: 01 June 2013
... River where its Islamic minarets and Orthodox domes overlook the city. A federal republic within Russia located 500 miles east of Moscow, Tatarstan has long been a model region for religious and ethnic tolerance. Half the republic’s four million inhabitants are Tatars, an indigenous non-Slavic...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (1 September 2014) 31 (3): 113–122.
Published: 01 September 2014
..., in Hungary in 1956 and Czechoslovakia in 1968, Warsaw Pact forces invaded these nations to enforce a return to an orthodox form of communism acceptable to the Kremlin. in many areas, the ancient left-right divisions are becoming increasingly difficult to distinguish or sustain . Now, the...