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baghdad

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Journal Article
World Policy Journal (2004) 21 (3): 101–103.
Published: 01 September 2004
.... Even the war’s oft-touted successes— the swift fall of Baghdad, the promise of free elections, and the projected war crimes trial of Saddam Hussein— possess, on closer scruti­ ny, a punishing downside. President George W. Bush’s repeated claim that the world is safer thanks to Operation Iraqi...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (2013) 30 (1): 63–76.
Published: 01 March 2013
...Ned Parker; Raheem Salman Ned Parker, a foreign correspondent for the Los Angeles Times , reported from Baghdad for seven years and has contributed to World Policy Journal . Raheem Salman covered the U.S. invasion of Iraq and the post-Saddam era for the Los Angeles Times from 2003 to 2011...
FIGURES
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (2003) 20 (3): 89–92.
Published: 01 September 2003
... in Terms of the National Interest. The problem is that President Bush asserted but was unable to demonstrate anything but a pos­ sible future threat to America’s national interests. For a casus belli, he relied on disputed or fuzzy intelligence concerning the Baghdad regime’s links...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (2002) 19 (3): 92–94.
Published: 01 September 2002
... officials implausibly, halfheartedly, and shamefully sought to justi­ fy their tilt toward, and covert aid for, the Butcher of Baghdad. A common view in the Middle East was the blunt judgment proffered to an Israeli cor­ respondent by Anwar Sadat, the late president of Egypt, that Saddam was “a madman...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (2004) 21 (2): 108–110.
Published: 01 June 2004
..., it is the horrors of Baghdad’s Abu Ghraib prison, whose satanic imagery has not only shamed the United States but also man­ aged to affront a majority of the world’s 1.6 billion Muslims. A core problem lies in the White House’s shifting rationale for its war-of-choice. Un­ able to showcase a stockpile...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (2005) 21 (4): 91–93.
Published: 01 December 2005
... was able to deliver, I think it was the next day, a list of 4,000 sites. We later sent another 1,000. I know they put those into their computers, into their mapping systems. And I know they made an effort not to destroy sites I [also) made the point the [Baghdad...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (2013) 30 (2): 108–117.
Published: 01 June 2013
...-the-world trip on a bicycle for the Australian Red Cross that followed a 3,000 mile bike-tour of Australia. Ten years later, at the height of the war in Iraq, he pitched up in Baghdad, offering himself as a human shield. Five years after that, he decided it would be a challenge to be the first Algerian...
FIGURES
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (2004) 21 (1): 1–13.
Published: 01 March 2004
... then offered a parable to illustrate his thesis: to pervade Washington before and after “A man armed only with a knife may decide Baghdad’s unexpectedly swift fall on April that a bear prowling in the forest is a tolera­ 10, 2003- “Axis of Evil,” “Let’s Roll,” ble danger, inasmuch as the alternative...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (2005) 22 (1): 9–18.
Published: 01 March 2005
... Saddam Hus­ the secretary general becoming a far more sein’s defeat in the first Gulf war, the sanc­ visible presence in the city; the United Na­ tions were to remain in place until Baghdad tions might even need to hire professional satisfied the terms of various U.N. resolu­ lobbying help. Second...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (2002) 19 (1): 111–114.
Published: 01 March 2002
... it with America’s handpicked choices in Baghdad. Writing in the March 11 New Yorker, the usually well-informed Seymour Hersh reported that many senior Bush administration offi­ cials believed it was not whether, but when, the action would take place, the best bet being this fall. One rubs one’s eyes...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (2002) 19 (3): 54–59.
Published: 01 September 2002
..., was replaced by anoth­ low unlimited oil sales and the purchase of a er, the United Nations Monitoring, Verifica­ vast range of goods and services. But, to the tion and Inspection Commission, designed unbounded annoyance of Baghdad, the U.N. to meet some Iraqi complaints. Now lead­ Secretariat, through...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (2002) 19 (2): 93–99.
Published: 01 June 2002
... and whatever is opposed to Islam, aggression, though never declared, was even if it is in the Constitution, we shall op­ Baghdad’s fear that Iran’s Shia would serve pose.” This was the new thinking that was as a revolutionary example for Iraq. What­ to play so important a role...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (2006) 23 (1): 85–91.
Published: 01 March 2006
... and shameful looting incident of our era, the plunder of the Iraq Museum in Baghdad on April 10-12, 2003. At least 15,000 objects were stolen, including Sumerian sculpture, Ab- basid wooden doors, Assyrian jewelry, the head of a Babylonian terra cotta lion, and around five thousand cylinder seals...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (2003) 19 (4): 1–11.
Published: 01 December 2003
... in a letter made nuclear capabilities from that period stated public last fall at the insistence of then Sen­ that “based on all credible information ate Intelligence Committee chairman Bob available to date.. .the IAEA has found no Graham, “Baghdad for now appears to be indication...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (2006) 23 (1): 1–16.
Published: 01 March 2006
... responsibility for the dev­ er prisoners. In this hothouse of radicalism, astating attack against the United Nations prisoners exchanged ideas and established headquarters in Baghdad. Zarqawi allied trust with one another. Zarqawi and Maq­ himself with Ansar al-Sunna, a reconstituted dasi continued...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (2011) 28 (1): 83–91.
Published: 01 March 2011
... 400 yards from the Russian embassy in the upscale Mansour neighborhood of Baghdad. Gunmen attacked the diplomats' car. One of the diplomats, Vitaly Titov, was severely wounded and died later that day. The other four men were kidnapped. On June 19, a group of Iraqi insurgents demanded Russian troops...
FIGURES
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (2002) 19 (2): 13–20.
Published: 01 June 2002
... since Saddam Hussein remained in power in ened to disrupt the Bush administration’s Baghdad, the real result of the Gulf War of plan for “regime change” in Iraq. This can 1990—91 was to establish a lasting Ameri­ be interpreted in two ways. On the one can military presence...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (2002) 19 (3): 51–53.
Published: 01 September 2002
... —understand that (in the words of the edi­ public relations campaign in favor of “re­ tor of this magazine) “being grown up about gime change” in Baghdad, by military force power politics does not mean that we have if need be. to pretend that all our foreign partners are And a good thing, too, one might...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (2004) 21 (2): 7–26.
Published: 01 June 2004
... de for Aznar. He had taken big and risky bets, Aristegui, came to speak at the Instituto and they seemed to have paid off very well. Cervantes in Dublin shortly after the fall He had banned Batasuna and, far from the of Baghdad, and made a cogent defense of Basque Country exploding, eta ’s...
Journal Article
World Policy Journal (2003) 19 (4): 85–88.
Published: 01 December 2003
..., and a great and strange silence. And in that silence there was naught to be heard save the frightened whim­ pering of Martin Dies crying: “Genie, genie!” But there was no answer, for the genie, an alien, was on the boat to Baghdad, and after...