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Table 2

Pandemic Health Equity Rapid Response Tactics

Effectively communicate health risk:
▪ Engage trusted community organizations and leaders to develop and disseminate messaging 
▪ Develop messaging that is relevant to socially vulnerable communities and recognizes the varying socioeconomic needs and differing levels of trust of health systems and government 
▪ Create materials at the appropriate reading level for broad audiences 
▪ Make information available in multiple languages using processes beyond translation that include a cultural understanding of specific communities with limited English proficiency 
▪ Use channels viewed as trusted and credible by socially vulnerable communities 
Implement socioculturally appropriate surveillance and risk reduction strategies:
▪ Create community-based surveillance programs that leverage community assets 
▪ Use community health workers and public health educators to collect surveillance data and share risk reduction information 
▪ Distribute information and supplies for risk reduction such as masks and hand sanitizer via community- and faith-based organizations 
Have emergency policies and executive orders ready to be rapidly implemented:
▪ Determine before a crisis what constitutes essential versus nonessential services 
▪ Require employers of front-line service providers (e.g., grocery and other retail stores, pharmacies, food plants, delivery services, etc.) to provide workers with PPE and paid sick leave 
Ensure timely and easily accessible testing:
▪ Use community-level data such as social vulnerability indices, availability of transportation, and population density to determine location and hours of operation for testing sites 
▪ Locate testing within the most socially vulnerable communities, ideally co-located with trusted community organizations 
▪ Provide testing at no cost, regardless of insurance status 
▪ Offer free transportation to testing sites 
▪ Monitor testing access data disaggregated by race, ethnicity, and language, and rapidly shift or expand testing based on identified inequities 
▪ Provide resources and post-testing information in multiple languages 
Provide equitable and rapid access to quality health care:
▪ Broadly disseminate maps and location details of health care providers and clinics 
▪ Deploy mobile testing and treatment units in communities with limited transportation access 
▪ Engage trusted community organizations in messaging and ensure information is available in multiple languages 
▪ Extend hours of access and provide free transportation 
▪ Suspend any requirements for insurance or documentation of residence 
▪ Prioritize support for health care providers in socially vulnerable communities 
* Local, state, and national funds should give priority to safety net providers and recognize differential needs given availability of resources at baseline 
* Government, public health, and health systems with greater resources should share tools, protocols, and knowledge to enable community-level response 
▪ Compare hospitalizations, use of specific treatments, and deaths by race, ethnicity, language, as well as social risk factors and determinants and create plans to address any differences identified 
▪ Ensure treatment and discharge information is available at the appropriate reading level and in multiple languages 
▪ Provide follow up care at no cost 
Provide equitable and rapid access to social and economic relief programs:
▪ Prioritize distribution of economic relief to communities identified as having the most urgent need based on surveillance data 
▪ Provide financial support to community- and faith-based organizations and other social service agencies to ensure service continuity and capacity 
Effectively communicate health risk:
▪ Engage trusted community organizations and leaders to develop and disseminate messaging 
▪ Develop messaging that is relevant to socially vulnerable communities and recognizes the varying socioeconomic needs and differing levels of trust of health systems and government 
▪ Create materials at the appropriate reading level for broad audiences 
▪ Make information available in multiple languages using processes beyond translation that include a cultural understanding of specific communities with limited English proficiency 
▪ Use channels viewed as trusted and credible by socially vulnerable communities 
Implement socioculturally appropriate surveillance and risk reduction strategies:
▪ Create community-based surveillance programs that leverage community assets 
▪ Use community health workers and public health educators to collect surveillance data and share risk reduction information 
▪ Distribute information and supplies for risk reduction such as masks and hand sanitizer via community- and faith-based organizations 
Have emergency policies and executive orders ready to be rapidly implemented:
▪ Determine before a crisis what constitutes essential versus nonessential services 
▪ Require employers of front-line service providers (e.g., grocery and other retail stores, pharmacies, food plants, delivery services, etc.) to provide workers with PPE and paid sick leave 
Ensure timely and easily accessible testing:
▪ Use community-level data such as social vulnerability indices, availability of transportation, and population density to determine location and hours of operation for testing sites 
▪ Locate testing within the most socially vulnerable communities, ideally co-located with trusted community organizations 
▪ Provide testing at no cost, regardless of insurance status 
▪ Offer free transportation to testing sites 
▪ Monitor testing access data disaggregated by race, ethnicity, and language, and rapidly shift or expand testing based on identified inequities 
▪ Provide resources and post-testing information in multiple languages 
Provide equitable and rapid access to quality health care:
▪ Broadly disseminate maps and location details of health care providers and clinics 
▪ Deploy mobile testing and treatment units in communities with limited transportation access 
▪ Engage trusted community organizations in messaging and ensure information is available in multiple languages 
▪ Extend hours of access and provide free transportation 
▪ Suspend any requirements for insurance or documentation of residence 
▪ Prioritize support for health care providers in socially vulnerable communities 
* Local, state, and national funds should give priority to safety net providers and recognize differential needs given availability of resources at baseline 
* Government, public health, and health systems with greater resources should share tools, protocols, and knowledge to enable community-level response 
▪ Compare hospitalizations, use of specific treatments, and deaths by race, ethnicity, language, as well as social risk factors and determinants and create plans to address any differences identified 
▪ Ensure treatment and discharge information is available at the appropriate reading level and in multiple languages 
▪ Provide follow up care at no cost 
Provide equitable and rapid access to social and economic relief programs:
▪ Prioritize distribution of economic relief to communities identified as having the most urgent need based on surveillance data 
▪ Provide financial support to community- and faith-based organizations and other social service agencies to ensure service continuity and capacity 
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