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yiddish

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2010) 56 (2): 254–259.
Published: 01 June 2010
...Sabine Haenni The Revolutionary Roots of Modern Yiddish, 1903–1917 , by Trachtenberg Barry , Syracuse : Syracuse University Press , 2008 . 222 pages. Copyright © Hofstra University 2010 Sabine Haenni How to Create a National Literature The Revolutionary Roots of Modern...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2007) 53 (1): 67–73.
Published: 01 March 2007
... stories, novels, and memoirs of immigrant writers Abraham Cahan and Mary Antin to second- and third-generation Jewish American writers like Philip Roth, Aryeh Lev Stollman, and Myla Goldberg, is the shifting presence of Yiddish and Hebrew in their largely English-language...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2007) 53 (1): 88–91.
Published: 01 March 2007
... to describe Anna O .’s language in her hysterical state as associated with “Jewish talk” or Yiddish. Based on this clarification, Weinbaum traces Anna O .’s cure in racial terms, as she “pro­ gresses” from talking “jargon” to speaking proper German (181). In the last chapter we return...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2019) 65 (1-2): 167–186.
Published: 01 March 2019
... are included in the 2011 collection published by Theatre Communications Group (TCG) Version 3.0. Contemporary Asian American Plays and edited by Chay Yew. 4 The 1996 edition of the Cambridge Guide to American Theater already features entries on Hispanic and Chicano Theater, Yiddish theater...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2013) 59 (4): 666–673.
Published: 01 December 2013
... an agreement with the idea they have of their own destinies” (113). Lucky survivors of the Holocaust, they speak in Yiddish, English, Polish and Russian, searching for new starts, for a sense of community. By contrast, Borinsky explores Cuban Americans through their links to what the critic Gustavo...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2010) 56 (2): 277–285.
Published: 01 June 2010
... think, is the enormous role Israel has played in answering the anxious questions of midcentury, especially after the Six-Day War. Any number of texts—Woody Allen’s Zelig, Art Spiegelman’s Maus, and Michael Chabon’s recent The Yiddish Policeman’s Union—could easily have carried forward...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2019) 65 (3): 289–298.
Published: 01 September 2019
... indicate that revival itself, in the form of undead corpses that narrate, best describes the uncanny nature of being situated in our present moment. Next, Martin turns his attention to twenty-first-century detective fiction—Michael Chabon’s The Yiddish Policemen’s Union (2007), Vikram Chandra’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2019) 65 (1-2): 121–144.
Published: 01 March 2019
... Text.” Charles King (2011 : 18), in his cultural history of Odessa, has described the essence of the city as “a veneer of Russian culture laid over a Yiddish, Greek, and Italian core.” As Rebecca Stanton (2012 : 20) has pointed out, the vision of “a space simultaneously contained within many cultures...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2003) 49 (3): 298–327.
Published: 01 September 2003
... from Eastern Europe to England in the pre-1914 decades (from 14,468 in 1880 to 82,844 in 1905), the speaking of Yiddish marked the Jew with a pro­ nounced Germanic foreignness (Feldman 139). As John Stevenson ob­ serves, the circle of targets widened to include Jews...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2007) 53 (3): 233–247.
Published: 01 September 2007
... The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay (2001) to The Final Solution (2005), a no­ vella featuring an unnamed but recognizable Sherlock Holmes, and his own alternate history The Yiddish Policemen’s Union (2007)— that serious authors should return to genre fiction as an antidote...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2018) 64 (2): 161–190.
Published: 01 June 2018
... neighborhood. For example, poor, newly arriving immigrants live in Down Neck, “where each fresh wave of immigrants first settled” (12), while earlier comers become more Americanized and move to better neighborhoods. Likewise, Jewish Americans move from “the Polish shtetl their Yiddish-speaking parents had re...