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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 72–91.
Published: 01 March 2001
...). The following suggests that Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises is much more narrator Jake Barnes’s memory o f war than has been recognized, in terms of landscape, imagery, allusions, and a recurring story of wounding. In this complex, poetic novel, war and wounding constitute a...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2006) 52 (3): 249–274.
Published: 01 September 2006
...Trevor Dodman Copyright © Hofstra University 2006 HI “ Going All to Pieces” : A Farewell to Arms as Trauma Narrative Trevor Dodman Bullet wounds do not cause severe bleeding unless they hap­ pen to injure some large trunk or smash one of the larger bones. Wounds...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2016) 62 (1): 104–109.
Published: 01 March 2016
... is planned and is certainly necessary, since so much of Eliot’s influential work as a critic, editor, and poet was still to come in 1922. Crawford declares simply and clearly in his introduction what principle has shaped his study. “Not marmoreal, but wounded and sometimes wounding, young T. S...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 92–113.
Published: 01 March 2001
... Indian camp. The night of horror in­ flicted “the wound” that never healed; the physical wound at Fossalta came too late for such effects. The girl watching a childbirth on the Karagatch Road (71)2 at least got to cry, and might well have recovered, but Nick appears...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2016) 62 (2): 197–222.
Published: 01 June 2016
... while he was recovering from shrapnel wounds he suffered as an ambulance driver for the Italian army during World War I. 8 The fact that von Kurowsky broke Hemingway’s heart with a “Dear John” letter has led many critics to read Catherine’s death as Hemingway’s fictional revenge. 9 Such...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2009) 55 (1): 58–79.
Published: 01 March 2009
... such a fool the cheek a cheek he cries I withdraw it thump on skull the cries cease it’s mechanical end of first lesson. (74) After some confusion, the narrator once again makes a breakthrough with his student: “the day comes we come to the day when stabbed in the arse now an open wound...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2003) 49 (4): 421–448.
Published: 01 December 2003
... Malta. She then continued her foreign service in August 1917 in France, in the northern town of Etaples, about 3 miles from the Straits of Dover, which housed a massive medical complex for wounded soldiers and military personnel traveling to and from England. The site became increasingly...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2006) 52 (1): 61–91.
Published: 01 March 2006
... existential way, dogged, wounded, even castrated “from the start.” This could be a more general human problem, but the term bitched seems to narrow the field by half in implying that the condition it names is—that bad thing—to be feminized. While feminization is not a word Hemingway himself...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2005) 51 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 March 2005
..., promises 4 Myth and History in Philip Roth’s American Pastoral above all to heal the wounds of time Myth is reassuring in its stability, whereas history is that powerhouse of change which destroys custom and tradition in producing the future.” (Graff, “American Criticism” 104...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2007) 53 (1): 23–39.
Published: 01 March 2007
... presumed self-contained unity was always illusory. It is not surprising that both Plunkett and the narrator, like other charac­ ters in the poem, end up wounded, limping, or fractured.12 But it is from the precariousness of those broken selves that a real acknowledgment of the other might emerge...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2018) 64 (4): 483–503.
Published: 01 December 2018
... impersonal process of meaning-making that enables mourning but does not do justice to the horrific reality of collective and personal trauma. At the same time, characterizing trauma as fundamentally unrepresentable itself poses ethical problems, seeming to consign the silent, inaccessible wound to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 371–393.
Published: 01 September 2007
... cal trauma. In light o f this notion, the opposed narrative o f the American past and present can be thought of, following Berger’s formulation, as the traumatic.8 Freud borrowed trauma, the Greek word for wound, to name the phenom enon o f a shocking event that proves...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2008) 54 (4): 493–513.
Published: 01 December 2008
... arrow-shower / Sent out of sight, somewhere becoming rain” (94). Such shafts are wounding, of course, and the arrow rain in “Whitsun Weddings” is double edged, figuring also as the penetrating phallus, an object of violence: “girls, gripping their handbags tighter, stared / At a 495...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): vii–xi.
Published: 01 June 2011
... peppery male femininity as a wound or calling his play with gender pathological, the author of “Hemingway, Literalism, and Transgender Reading” argues systematically that those critics who fantasize about gender 2 as innate and pre-cultural haven‘t just missed the boat...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2008) 54 (3): 401–409.
Published: 01 September 2008
... wounds by repressing fear, rage, guilt, and shame in a “distinguished career as a militant suffragist who survives imprisonment and force-feeding” (238). Similarly, the artist figure of Elvira originates in The Pargiters as a wounded but articulate prophet­ ess heralding arboreal...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 409–415.
Published: 01 September 2009
... sacrifice of black Americans. At the same time, McCann argues, El- lison turns black people into a renewed image of the presidency itself, in which black martyrdom, paradoxically, guarantees national justice. By the Vietnam era, McCann claims, the wounded veteran had taken up this martyrological...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 416–422.
Published: 01 September 2009
... the “same deep desire for the comfort of closure” (130): triumphalist narratives like Fukuyama’s and Buchanan’s attempt to declare victory in and over the past and move on, while trauma narratives work to examine past wounds as a way to heal and move past them—in both forms the past is...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2010) 56 (1): 92–98.
Published: 01 March 2010
... perhaps not unfamiliar story: a scholar and artist bleeding out his days with uninterested students, por- ing over exams and papers with exacting and mostly unappreciated detail. Add to that Hopkins’s chronic pain and fatigue, and the tale is at times so glum that the read wounds the reader...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 569–595.
Published: 01 December 2001
... tempers this pessimism with the regenerative potential of the aesthetic. When existing political and social metaphors fail to hold the subject’s allegiance, Rushdie suggests, we must turn to the aesthetic to provide a new perspective, to heal historical wounds enough to make renewed...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2005) 51 (4): 437–466.
Published: 01 December 2005
... ing from a wound in his forehead. “Murder,” he shouts, “mur­ der, murder.” Helplessly I watch the blood streaming. At last my voice tears itself loose from my chest. I too shout: “Murder, mur­ der, help, help,” and the sound fills the room. (13) 451 Maren Linett Various aspects...