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woodland

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 367–390.
Published: 01 December 2006
...Malcolm Woodland Copyright © Hofstra University 2006 41 Wordsworth Stranded: The Prelude and Mark Strand s “The Untelling” Malcolm Woodland “Say,” I said. “If translation is a kind of reading, the assump­ tion or transformation of one personal idiom into another...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2006) 52 (2): 237–240.
Published: 01 June 2006
...David Jarraway Wallace Stevens and the Apocalyptic Mode , by Woodland Malcolm , Iowa City : University of Iowa Press , 2005 . 256 pages. Copyright © Hofstra University 2006 Apocalypse without Apocalypse Wallace Stevens and the Apocalyptic Mode by Malcolm Woodland Iowa City...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 21–48.
Published: 01 March 2017
... when I take down the map of this island, it is never so I can say here is the masterful, the apt rendering of the spherical as flat, nor an ingenious design which persuades a curve into a plane, but to tell myself again that the line which says woodland and cried hunger and gives out among...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2001) 47 (2): 268–292.
Published: 01 June 2001
... himself as dressed. Barefoot, bare-chested, radiant and personable against the shadowy woods, he called” (153). Paul Hammond has noted the homoeroticism implicit in the gaze in this tableau, in which the vicar Mr. Beebe watches George and Fred­ dy “romping naked in the woodland pool before...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2003) 49 (2): 164–192.
Published: 01 June 2003
... the map. Boland’s poem introduces a register of space that commingles the history of the starving Irish peasants with the ho­ mogenous, timeless space of cartography, a space that can only be recog­ nized by its cartographic absence: “the line which says woodland and cries hunger...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2003) 49 (2): 219–245.
Published: 01 June 2003
... to Moore and her mother in the same way that The Wind in the Willows did, a book they so loved that they adopted its woodland personae as their own. But the James family was a specifically American ideal: not only did it pro­ vide an environment in which art could thrive, but this family...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2014) 60 (3): 367–396.
Published: 01 September 2014