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wilde

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 343–350.
Published: 01 June 2013
...Jesse Matz Monopolizing the Master: Henry James and the Politics of Modern Literary Scholarship , by Anesko Michael , Stanford University Press , 2012 . 248 pages. Oscar’s Shadow: Wilde, Homosexuality, and Modern Ireland , by Walshe Éibhear , Cork University Press , 2011...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2017) 63 (2): 228–236.
Published: 01 June 2017
... exceptions I take to the handling of aspects of Eliot’s prose and poetry in the book’s closing chapter, the comparative absence and at moments mischaracterization of Oscar Wilde’s attitudes and writings, and the neglect of gendered perspectives except abstractly (in Sherry’s brief attention to queer theory...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2005) 51 (1): 43–63.
Published: 01 March 2005
... fact “needed before it is appre­ ciated and independent of appreciation” (60). For Forster, echoing Wilde and to some extent Whistler, art anticipates its “utility,” is indifferent to public approval or censure, moves faster than life’s capacity or inclination to apprehend it, and, recalling...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2016) 62 (2): 231–239.
Published: 01 June 2016
... “degenerate,” “wild child,” and “ideology” of neuroscience. In chapter 1, “The Bearing Across of Language: Care, Catachresis, and Political Failure,” Berger clearly and forcefully lays out the primary conflict that will enliven the readings of dys-/disarticulate figures throughout this book: the ways in...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2008) 54 (1): 105–114.
Published: 01 March 2008
... front of modernity: “If anything, he [Shaw] felt himself honored by the arbitrary ban imposed upon his comedies as upon Ibsen’s Ghosts, Tolstoy’s The Power of Darkness and Wilde’s Salomé” (152). Joyce’s description of the controversy surrounding the production of the play and the subsequent...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2013) 59 (3): 513–519.
Published: 01 September 2013
... Lopez, Qiping Yin, Ira Nadel, and Fen Gao. Longxi’s essay, for example, “Elective Affinities? On Wilde’s Reading of Zhaungzi” offers a reading of Oscar Wilde’s essay, “A Chinese 514 Review Sage,” in which Wilde’s individualist socialism shows a clear debt to the Chinese philosopher...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2013) 59 (4): 657–665.
Published: 01 December 2013
... by Frances Dickey University of  Virginia Press, 2012. 260 pages Michael Coyle Early on in this accomplished and wide-reaching study, Frances Dickey distinguishes between the late Victorian poetic tropes of “persona” and “portrait.” But leave it to Oscar Wilde to muddle such a fine...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2010) 56 (1): 47–70.
Published: 01 March 2010
... resistance to what the poem “Orchard” calls “loveliness.” Although many of the volume’s poems are named for flowers, they are the “sea” versions—hard, sparse, wild, and stony in their defense against danger and weather. Cultivating life and art on the border between land and sea, the collection...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2001) 47 (2): 268–292.
Published: 01 June 2001
... iden­ tify and to delineate homotextuality. Ruth Robbins’s work on mascu­ linity and homoeroticism in the poetry of Oscar Wilde and A. E. Housman provides an example of what such a study can yield. Robbins refers to both of these poets’ attempt to use a “poetic code” to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2005) 51 (4): 391–413.
Published: 01 December 2005
.... Understandably, then, the question of “love’s bitter mystery” remains, to borrow Lord Alfred Douglas’s phrase forever associated with Oscar Wilde, a love for Stephen that literally “dare not speak its name.”2 Stephen’s silence reflects two interrelated anxieties that Yeats and Wilde...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2017) 63 (4): 385–404.
Published: 01 December 2017
... birds of the same race, would be of little significance, if they had not all descended from a single wild stock. The question of their origin is therefore of fundamental importance, and must be discussed at considerable length. —Charles Darwin, The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2003) 49 (4): 494–519.
Published: 01 December 2003
.... Further, these metaphors invite engagement with many issues of pressing concern to women artists, including sexuality, reproduction, and the complex relations between the natural and the artificial, wildness and domestication.4 No women poets, however, grant more prominence to the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 305–329.
Published: 01 September 2015
..., implicitly understood as distinct from the animal in every way. Enter the bird. “A little green bird was observing [Adela], so brilliant and neat that it might have hopped straight out of a shop. On catching her eye it closed its own, gave a small skip and prepared to go to bed. Some Indian wild bird...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 492–512.
Published: 01 December 2000
...Richard Dellamora Copyright © Hofstra University 2001 Apocalyptic Irigaray Richard Dellamora 661 I 1 he Book of Life begins with a man and a woman in a garden. It ends _L with Revelations” (94). These sentences comprise one of Oscar Wilde’s best known...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2008) 54 (4): 493–513.
Published: 01 December 2008
... intermittent 497 Rodney Stenning Edgecombe genealogy of the form from Catullus (“Multas per gentes et multa per aequora vectus” [172]) through Wilde’s sonnets at the graves of Shelley and Keats to Alan Tate’s “Ode to the Confederate Dead” and Lowell’s “Quaker Graveyard in Nantucket.” That...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 378–392.
Published: 01 September 2009
... Shakespeare is to be equated with Hamlet’s father, the talk turns to other recent scholarship in that vein: The most brilliant of all is that story of Wilde’s, Mr Best said, lifting his brilliant notebook. That Portrait of Mr. W. H. where he proves that the sonnets were written by...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2015) 61 (2): 272–279.
Published: 01 June 2015
... fictionalization (life a fiction of fiction), then Yeats’s imperative is indeed confounded, and his more paradox-inclined countryman’s claim confirmed, that “Life imitates Art, that Life in fact is the mirror, and Art the reality” (**Wilde [1889] 1905). Here is no decision to be made between mutually exclusive...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2010) 56 (1): 92–98.
Published: 01 March 2010
... impress his superiors.) Hopkins is thus eventually farmed out to Dublin, where the Jesuits are struggling to found a Catholic university for the Catholic majority in Ireland. One superior wrote of the bizarre priest’s new appointment: “He may be a success in the native city of Oscar Wilde” (314...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2014) 60 (3): 414–422.
Published: 01 September 2014
... Wilde to de Man, which in their various ways identify and wrestle with “author,” “agency,” and “autonomy” as terms around which many of the twentieth-century’s aesthetic and theoretical debates revolve. 415 Michael LeMahieu In addition to rethinking the received wisdom of literary...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2003) 49 (4): 472–493.
Published: 01 December 2003
...” literary history in a language that only she can control. Smith leads us on this wild goose chase to what is at most a misquotation of a translation of a translation of an obscure book of debatable authority. What does she offer us instead? I want to look closely at the first lines of the...