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walshe

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 343–350.
Published: 01 June 2013
...Jesse Matz Monopolizing the Master: Henry James and the Politics of Modern Literary Scholarship , by Anesko Michael , Stanford University Press , 2012 . 248 pages. Oscar’s Shadow: Wilde, Homosexuality, and Modern Ireland , by Walshe Éibhear , Cork University Press , 2011...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 168–195.
Published: 01 June 2010
...Rachel Ann Walsh Copyright © Hofstra University 2010 Rachel Ann Walsh “Not Grace, Then, but at Least the Body”: Accounting for the Self in Coetzee’s Age of Iron Rachel Ann Walsh If I look back over my own fiction, I see a simple (simple-mind- ed?) standard...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 199–223.
Published: 01 June 2011
... our own era of globalization is the focus of the recently published collection, edited by Davis Schneiderman and Philip Walsh, Retaking the Universe: William S. Burroughs in the Age of Globalization. 8. In reading Burroughs against conventional ideas of postmodernism I am of course indebted to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2018) 64 (1): 25–52.
Published: 01 March 2018
... fictional form. “The Martyr” (1923) is a thinly veiled satire of Mexican muralist Diego Rivera and his model and wife Lupe Marín; “That Tree” (1934) models its protagonists on the famous Mexico-based US journalist Carleton Beals; and, as Thomas Walsh has shown, “Flowering Judas” (1930) uses composite...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2013) 59 (1): 1–36.
Published: 01 March 2013
...” (Wising 4). It follows that Burroughs urges us to contest capitalist globalization, which the Schneiderman and Walsh anthology Retaking the Universe: William S. Burroughs in the Age of Globalization (2004) models as a post- Cold War order of domination. Burroughs, we are told, “might well...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2015) 61 (4): 460–483.
Published: 01 December 2015
... 2005 , 134–65; for a reading that emphasizes the patriotic link between Ireland and Britain in the novel, see Walshe 2005 , 145. 3 Matt Eatough borrows the term “metrocolonial” (2012, 71) from Joseph Valente’s Dracula’s Crypt: Bram Stoker, Irishness, and the Question of Blood (2002) to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 49–74.
Published: 01 March 2017
... past only by understanding how it is, in effect, preserved by our physical surroundings” (1992, 6–7), Woolf’s exploration of Clarissa Dalloway, Peter Walsh, and Septimus Warren Smith’s individual memories via glass on the streets of London complicates our sense both of what constitutes the collective...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 360–368.
Published: 01 June 2013
...- enues of impassioned sexuality (Peter Walsh and Sally Seton), Lady Slane, the heroine of Sackville-West’s All Passion Spent, mourns the vocational opportunities marriage foreclosed from her life and consequently develops categorical distinctions between Victorian femininity and a non-conform- ist...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 392–410.
Published: 01 September 2015
... characteristics of material objects in Bowen’s work. A World of Love is as much a ghost story as it is a love story. Keri Walsh sees this quality of Bowen’s work in connection with Breton’s surrealism, which acknowledged “the interpenetration of waking and sleeping states” (2007, 144). 9 For Bennett...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2016) 62 (4): 379–402.
Published: 01 December 2016
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 394–405.
Published: 01 September 2007
... tive guessing. Except for the new vocabulary, this is something we always did. But in Zunshine’s opening example we see a new question on the horizon. She asks us how we know that Peter Walsh’s trembling (when he visits Clarissa Dalloway on the m orning o f her party, not having seen her...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2016) 62 (3): 309–336.
Published: 01 September 2016
... which traditionally prefers its ruling values to remain implicit” (quoted in Walsh 2006 , 282), and indeed, Thatcher’s oratory tended to literalize metaphors. I want here briefly to establish how Thatcherism reconfigured in public discourse such categories as public and private, male and female, and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2013) 59 (3): 465–493.
Published: 01 September 2013
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2006) 52 (2): 145–174.
Published: 01 June 2006
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2010) 56 (1): 25–46.
Published: 01 March 2010
... brought social and aesthetic gains. In Mrs. Dalloway Peter Walsh, considering how England has changed since his last visit, before the war, observes the “returned Anglo-Indian . . . summing up the ruin of the world,” but he is nonetheless “astonished by the beauty” of London (162...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2012) 58 (1): 1–25.
Published: 01 March 2012
..., where young Rachel Vinrace is initiated into a society unlike any she has known in her sheltered life with her father. This hotel is very different from the London establishment where Peter Walsh will take up occupancy in Mrs. Dalloway (1924), and the reasons for this speak to Woolf’s own...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 187–212.
Published: 01 June 2012
... animistic conception of London which al- lows her to claim “odd affinities” with other urban lives—“the fat lady in the cab,” “some man behind a counter” (149)—in whom her soul might survive after death. Mindful of the gaps in Clarissa’s transcendental theory, Peter Walsh recalls the Victorian...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 582–605.
Published: 01 December 2012
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 299–328.
Published: 01 September 2017
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2007) 53 (1): 40–66.
Published: 01 March 2007
... mourn a long-lost love through an eternity of seasons and ages. We also view the woman through the perspectives of both Peter Walsh and Lucrezia Smith, as Peter rather off-handedly gives her a coin and Lucrezia more actively sympathizes with her by imagining herself in the woman’s...