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walking

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2010) 56 (3): 341–370.
Published: 01 September 2010
...Luke Carson; Heather Cass White Copyright © Hofstra University 2010 Marianne Moore’s “Walking-Sticks and Paperweights and Watermarks” Difficult Ground: Poetic Renunciation in Marianne Moore’s “Walking-Sticks and Paperweights and Watermarks” Luke Carson and Heather Cass White...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 56–77.
Published: 01 March 2000
...—passively or appreciatively, as mortal or immortal. Lit- 62 NIGHT AND DAY AND LITERARY LONDON “ CHURCH ROW,” OR PROSPECT PLACE, Nos. 59 t o 63 CHEYNE WALK The X on one pane of the window far right marks Holman H unt’s studio. London County Council. The Survey of London...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 72–91.
Published: 01 March 2001
...), it is a component of this novel’s implied, and shaping, background story. In the novel’s opening scene at the Café Versailles, Jake names places where he and Cohn could go for a walking trip. First he suggests that they “fly to Strasbourg” and from there climb to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2017) 63 (4): 385–404.
Published: 01 December 2017
... Leaves,” and “Walking-Sticks and Paperweights and Watermarks,” are those that attend any reintroduced species: survival in the wild depends on a gene pool sufficiently hardy for propagation and the ability of the species to find and occupy a sustainable ecological niche. In the case of poetry, the gene...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2002) 48 (4): 461–486.
Published: 01 December 2002
... as he walks along Sandymount Strand in the “Pro­ teus” chapter is the question of perception: how does one conceive the world if not through the eyes? The visible world is an “ineluctable mo­ dality”—providing signs to read (or “signatures”) even in natural flotsam and jetsam: “seaspawn and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2003) 49 (4): 472–493.
Published: 01 December 2003
...”: With my looks I am bound to look simple or fast I would rather look simple So I wear a tall hat on the back of my head that is rather a temple And I walk rather queerly and comb my long hair And people say, Don’t bother about her. So in my time I have...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2005) 51 (4): 491–494.
Published: 01 December 2005
... most extensive and detailed of the memoirs collected, provides a refreshing change in register. We learn of Ammons’s affection for long walks, dirty jokes, and (alas) Ronald Reagan. But couldn’t the editors have given us more such shifts in approach, a little 493 Peter Campion more salutary...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2009) 55 (2): 232–254.
Published: 01 June 2009
... “fervently,” “Let us take her!” The bodies of the boys are in constant motion as they walk through Dublin and encounter the ur- ban disruptions that make the argument difficult to “follow.”8 As Stephen concludes his “hypothesis,” a “dray laden with old iron” prevents him from continuing, and Lynch...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 92–113.
Published: 01 March 2001
... well knew the pattern (and who won and who lost). His respect for his father never recovered. He had no positive role model for relations with women. Nick lost his original advantage with Prudie, who dropped him for Frank Washburn, and with Marge, who walked away with dignity from the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2010) 56 (1): 25–46.
Published: 01 March 2010
... movement and advancement. To be a mem- ber of this community is, as Louis says, to “press on, from chaos making order” (146) or as Bernard says, to walk “in step” on the “illumined and everlasting road” (259). In their grief Neville and Bernard are moved to resist their culture’s emphasis on...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2007) 53 (4): 530–534.
Published: 01 December 2007
... walking us through text and theory before drawing conclusions. This allows us to make the connections alongside her rather than being handed an interpretive inevitability. Putting together Ramphele’s theoretical framework withTlali’s novel Muriel at Metropolitan, for example, we get this...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 437–461.
Published: 01 December 2010
... cosmopolitanism and demonstrates the inequitable privileges of metropolitan internationalism as delineated by Williams (109). Aimlessly walking the streets of London on a winter evening, Woolf’s speaker seeks dissolution into the anonymous crowd. “[Shedding] the self our friends know us by” (20) allows...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2002) 48 (3): 239–263.
Published: 01 September 2002
... struct the island in terms o f a prior, exotic, and less-sophisticated era. T he narrative’s premier example o f the island’s vital commerce in cross- cultural exchange is in the celebration known in Willow Springs as Candle Walk. O ccurring annually on Decem ber 22, Candle Walk is...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2006) 52 (3): 249–274.
Published: 01 September 2006
... here now. I wished I were in Milan with her. I would like to eat at the Cova and then walk down Via Manzoni in the hot evening and cross over and turn off along the canal and go to the hotel with Catherine Barkley. Maybe she would. Maybe she would pretend that I was her boy that...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 413–442.
Published: 01 December 2006
... provided a fertile soil within which mass fash­ ion took root. As a mobile and personalized form of display, fashion was particularly suited to a society characterized, more and more, by mobile individuals” (142).The walk up Broadway, as Carrie discovers soon after her arrival in New York...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2002) 48 (3): 348–361.
Published: 01 September 2002
... human lin­ eages are not so indisputably, physically apparent as those o f dogs (16). W oolf tries to imagine w hat the sensual impressions o f Flush’s pup- pyhood w ould have been. Walking with Miss M itford in the country­ side, “a variety o f smells interwoven in subtlest...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 417–423.
Published: 01 September 2015
... roots while enacting social commentary on contemporaneous civil rights struggles (72). Marcoux underscores how Henderson extends Hughes’s example through his verbal translation of free jazz, in poems such as “Walk with De Mayor of Harlem” and “Elvin Jones Gretsch Freak,” adapting jazz improvisation into...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2016) 62 (2): 240–245.
Published: 01 June 2016
.... The book is rife with sharp insights, particularly relating to photographs and films. The unsettling reversal of war’s end is nicely captured by narrating the evolving interpretation of the iconic photograph of a well-dressed child walking down a country path in Germany, averting his gaze from the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2007) 53 (2): vi–x.
Published: 01 June 2007
... science, but ended up all aglow, to my considerable surprise, with the hope “for a rapprochement between the disciplines.”The essay walked me—almost literally—from dismissive reflexion to submis­ sive meditation in the course of a couple of dreary late-fall after­ noons. In that regard, reading...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2008) 54 (2): 193–216.
Published: 01 June 2008
... Leonard’s jarring (because overly intense) expressions of desire for knowledge. After Leonard’s adventurous nightlong walk into the coun­ 205 Kim Shirkhani tryside, the sisters are impressed by the bold originality of his action but keep beating back his explanation of it in terms of the books that...