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vicarious

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 629–633.
Published: 01 December 2009
...William Benzon Comeuppance: Costly Signaling, Altruistic Punishment, and Other Biological Components of Fiction , by Flesch William , Cambridge : Harvard University Press , 2007 . 252 pages. Copyright © Hofstra University 2009 Review Altruism, Gossip, and the Vicarious...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 343–350.
Published: 01 June 2013
... showing the Master’s aura to be an effect of sublimation. The earlier phase had its leading figure in Percy Lubbock, who had been the recipient of some of James’s most “amative” and explicit let- ters, in which James “took enormous vicarious interest in Lubbock’s clandestine adventures” (85). But...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2004) 50 (2): 167–191.
Published: 01 June 2004
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2018) 64 (2): 247–258.
Published: 01 June 2018
... denied us.” It therefore follows that viewers remain “haunted by certain absences in the painting”: phenomena that are not seen directly but instead vicariously through the eyes of the sundry Middle Eastern men transfixed by the child’s finely choreographed routine. To Joseph Allen Boone, in his...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2007) 53 (1): 23–39.
Published: 01 March 2007
... beneath layers of mythical parallels that allow for her vicarious possession. Like Plunkett, the narrator is endlessly fascinated by Helen’s beauty and repeatedly paralyzed by her disdainful attitude. Both characters consis­ tently try to counteract her alterity by clothing it with poetic...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2007) 53 (2): 182–211.
Published: 01 June 2007
... a curious fantasy projection: by summoning and abolishing her past lovers, and by associating the Captain with an asexual sense of propriety, Niel still struggles to manage his own lingering desire for Marian. Rather than acknowledging this desire directly, he transforms it into a vicarious...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2000) 46 (2): 171–192.
Published: 01 June 2000
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2003) 49 (2): 193–218.
Published: 01 June 2003
... (127) 207 Shannon McRae Eliot, however, directs the reader’s attention to her carnal physicality, gazing contemptously as she “slips softly to her needful stool.” Her sole intel­ lectual activity during this task consists of vicariously experiencing yet another rape: Clarissa in “the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2004) 50 (2): 141–166.
Published: 01 June 2004
... narrator’s investment in these gypsies starts to seem indeed a little dangerous. The identity of the girl’s victim is deliberately left ambiguous (“sidle up” to whom but the impression is that the narrator vicariously participates in or enjoys this seduction. Woolf flirts with the suggestiveness of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 357–377.
Published: 01 September 2009
..., especially the liberal fringes of society, to have a vicarious, ‘sanitized’ African experience . . . without that uncomfortable intimacy” of colonial subjects (205). 375 Bridget T. Chalk Works cited Chalk, Bridget. “‘I Am Not England’: Narrative and National Identity in Aar- on’s Rod...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2019) 65 (1-2): 121–144.
Published: 01 March 2019
... Nazi terror, vicariously experienced in Dancing in Odessa through Kaminsky’s poetic doubles Osip Mandelstam and Paul Celan. Kaminsky’s design, as he proclaims in his opening “Author’s Prayer,” is to “speak for the dead” (1). The historic calamities afflicting the Soviet population in the twentieth...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 187–212.
Published: 01 June 2012
... the branch stretched he, too, made that statement” (22). In this light, the “matter” of life throbbing from Septimus’s body to Clarissa’s in her vicarious experience of his suicide strips human existence of its cultural protections to reveal our mortal being in all its anguished vulnerability...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2018) 64 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 March 2018
... mere kicky new experience. It can be whatever he likes or imagines to be, because it is his choice, by nature temporary and dismissible the instant it no longer amuses him. (1978, 236) For Morgan, this masochism is just another masculine prerogative; no amount of vicarious suffering can produce real...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 239–266.
Published: 01 September 2017
... to Miles’s Pinocchio, Margaret is to endow him with the feeling he lacks and so transform him into a real boy, but this is a double bind, since to be animated vicariously by Margaret’s emotion would make Miles—at least to his own anti-sentimental mind—into a puppet of another, plusher kind...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2004) 50 (3): 207–238.
Published: 01 September 2004
... of pain. Although aesthetic experi­ ence is usually associated with pleasure— or with the vicarious pleasures of tragic, pathetic, or sentimental pain—pain demonstrates even more forcefully the severe concentration of particularity. Pain concentrates the present moment with the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 443–473.
Published: 01 December 2006
... significance and complexity. The feelies empty Othello of its driving emotion—passion—in order to serve the needs of a culture that prescribes periodic “Violent Passion Substitutes” to keep people properly subdued. Vicarious, mediated ac­ tivities such as the feelies “ensure that the release...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2007) 53 (4): 459–487.
Published: 01 December 2007
... trickle of it had after a mo­ ment swelled from Gussy’s bps into a stream by which our friend’s con­ sciousness was flooded” (42). This vicarious feeding of Gray to Rosanna reaches its logical climax when Gussy makes her “final leap to action” in the form of the announcement, “I want him to dinner...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2008) 54 (2): 129–165.
Published: 01 June 2008
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 148–179.
Published: 01 June 2011