1-7 of 7 Search Results for

transgender

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 148–179.
Published: 01 June 2011
...Valerie Rohy Copyright © Hofstra University 2011 Valerie Rohy Hemingway, Literalism, and Transgender Reading Valerie Rohy From the 1980s to the turn of the twenty-first century, Hemingway studies underwent a fundamental revision, as new scholarship revealed unimagined...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): vii–xi.
Published: 01 June 2011
...Patricia Yaeger Copyright © Hofstra University 2011 Twentieth-Century Literature’s Andrew J. Kappel Prize in Literary Criticism, 2011 The winner of this year’s prize is Valery Rohy’s “Hemingway, Literalism, and Transgender Reading.” The judge is Patricia Yaeger, Henry Simmons Frieze...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2006) 52 (3): 347–351.
Published: 01 September 2006
... transgendered even if he never cared to or dared to admit it himself” (76). In a sense, queerness is a cop-out in that it refuses to commit to any spe­ cific sexual predilection, but this characterization is capacious and sensitive enough to represent all of the curious sexual energies of Hemingway’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2003) 49 (3): 277–297.
Published: 01 September 2003
... Gordon’s “inversion” as an example not of lesbianism but of “female masculinity” (Halberstam) or transgender identity (Prosser, particularly 155-68). In fact, the gender and sexuality of Hall’s protagonist have been critically unstable, shifting as her in-between narrative is refracted...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2013) 59 (4): 596–618.
Published: 01 December 2013
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 287–321.
Published: 01 September 2009
... Village’s popular venue Webster Hall, the very sort of place that the uptown Werther was “driven” to find. Here Alexis, a transgender boy from uptown, mourns how recent efforts to regulate nighttime leisure have made even this queer dance too clean for his tastes. According to Kevin...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 131–167.
Published: 01 June 2010