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tourist

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2002) 48 (4): 393–426.
Published: 01 December 2002
... not to have struggled to overcome their environment. They accommodated themselves to it, interpreted it and made it personal; lived in a dignified relation with it. In more senses than one they built themselves into it” (85). She suggests that tourists to Mesa Verde could recapture this...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2002) 48 (1): 22–49.
Published: 01 March 2002
... discovery,3 but Cather’s work also reflects the experiences of early twentieth-century tourists vis­ iting the Southwest. Although Tom Outland’s archeological discovery is portrayed as a unique historical event, his encounter also represents the experience of many visitors to the ruins...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2013) 59 (1): 1–36.
Published: 01 March 2013
...” (World 35), in that he had specific ideological commitments that were bound up with the touristic mar- ketplace. Burroughs valorized the libertarian freedom that he associated with the vanished frontier of the American West, and sought to recover this autonomy through a creative usage of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 224–254.
Published: 01 June 2011
... the development of Irish tourist traffic in and around Dublin by means of petrolpropelled riverboats, plying in the fluvial fairway between Island bridge and Ringsend, chara- bancs, narrow gauge local railways, and pleasure steamers for coastwise navigation (10/- per person...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2005) 51 (3): 285–315.
Published: 01 September 2005
... intertextuality. Her encounters with the mountain were physical, textual, and intellectual: she experienced the direct and strenuous contact of the climber, the linguisti­ cally mediated and physically distanced perspective of the tourist, and the more cerebral positions of poet and naturalist, all of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2003) 49 (1): 12–31.
Published: 01 March 2003
... as the prime place of reference (especially Gopnik and Lewis) and in being sojourners, writers who know in ad­ vance their time in France will be limited, and so situate themselves be­ tween the willed mobility of tourists and travelers on one hand and the deracinated identity of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2016) 62 (2): 145–169.
Published: 01 June 2016
... interests and expertise, and given the special bile he reserves for tourists in V . and Gravity’s Rainbow , how could Pynchon not have paid attention to Century 21? Letters at the Harry Ransom Center from Pynchon to his Cornell classmates Kirkpatrick and Faith Sale have aided in Luc Herman and John...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2007) 53 (4): 530–534.
Published: 01 December 2007
... on Mda’s The Heart of Redness: Mda’s novel of the millennium thus seems poised between an acceptance of a kind of postmodern nomadism—of a world of exiles, tourists, and migrants—and a desire to recover a sense of local belonging and indigeneity in a way that is utterly char­...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2010) 56 (1): 107–115.
Published: 01 March 2010
... scholars alike are finding common ground in new archival evidence for their conclusions with respect to Beckett’s “poetics of unknowing” (Nixon, “What a Tourist” 190), “poetics of ignorance” (Van Hulle 291), or “poetics of residua” (Caselli, Beckett’s Dantes 249). If the critical response to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2016) 62 (4): 379–402.
Published: 01 December 2016
... recent expatriate but also an initiate into London’s artistic avant-garde, Hermione approaches museum culture with a double vision: she possesses at once the eye of the tourist outsider, approaching European culture from a distance, and with the eye of the native skeptic, distrusting the sense of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 180–198.
Published: 01 June 2011
... a promising, if still anxious, alternative: “This is not quite our house yet,” said Helen. “When Miss Avery called, I felt we are only a couple of tourists.” “We shall be that everywhere, and for ever.” “But affectionate tourists—” “But tourists...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2017) 63 (4): 427–450.
Published: 01 December 2017
... these visits, with “Jamestown,” later called “Virginia Britannia,” drafted in the summer of 1935. The previous year, the Moores had been among 30,000 tourists who visited Colonial Williamsburg to see work in progress on the restoration of the eighteenth-century town. Moore wrote to Bryher on August 27...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2011) 57 (3-4): 447–471.
Published: 01 December 2011
... natural 455 Ursula K. Heise scientists, anthropologists, and paleontologists for research. But on the second expedition, his fellow-geologist Dexter Trumball, son of one of the venture’s major sponsors, argues that future expeditions can only be financed by opening Mars up to tourist...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2004) 50 (1): 1–17.
Published: 01 March 2004
..., he and his second wife, Margerie, had found themselves accused of violating the terms of their tourist visas by working as writers. Given the extent to which, throughout the first half of the twentieth century, modernist literary production was being conducted primarily by tourists and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 21–48.
Published: 01 March 2017
... can be seen on bright days posed next to the statues, their bodies seeming fat and well-fed next to these figures that recall anonymous ancestors and forge a connection between diaspora and Irish homeland. These tourist photographs dedicated to personal genealogy and ancestral remembrance reverse a...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 283–308.
Published: 01 June 2013
..., the narrator views herself as both kinds of tourist: “We are either pilgrims from sentiment . . . or we are scientific in our pilgrimage.” This is a subject to which Woolf is often drawn. “We cannot get past a great writer’s house without pausing to give an extra look into it and furnishing it...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2018) 64 (2): 191–222.
Published: 01 June 2018
... ability to “arous[e] an independent life in . . . things” (2006, 183)—she was once regularly portrayed as politically disengaged, invested in aesthetic insularity, and a literary “tourist.” 7 This tendency was answered by critical attempts to recover the submerged political content in her poems, a turn...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2015) 61 (4): 460–483.
Published: 01 December 2015
... conditions that drove the provisions for partition in the Anglo-Irish Treaty. Yet with some irony, Bowen notes that this violent history has become reduced to picturesque views for the tourist’s gaze. “Ruins—and there are many—by now seem natural to the country . . . for the traveler, nothing but picturesque...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2012) 58 (3): 495–514.
Published: 01 September 2012
... tired of your dreary tourist ideas of our Negro selves our selves are in far worse condition than the obviousness of your color sense (468) His reference to “tourist ideas” of “Negro selves” is perhaps awkward, in that O’Hara himself, as I have argued, often inhabits and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2008) 54 (1): 31–46.
Published: 01 March 2008
... in a patois (“patwhat” [23 with Mutt acting as the local and Jute as the tourist, as Danis Rose and John O ’Hanlon note (18). Mutt explains that he became a stutterer (“stun a stummer” [22]) at the battle of Clontarf (“Dungtarf Remembering the batde—and the death of Brian Boru, an...