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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2018) 64 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 March 2018
... point between humanism and antihumanism, its depictions of objectified, fragmented, or otherwise compromised selves dramatizing both the terror and the allure of erotic nonsovereignty. More often than not, though, it was the workaday life of the managerial subject that returned in this erotic literature...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2001) 47 (2): 268–292.
Published: 01 June 2001
...A. A. Markley Copyright © Hofstra University 2001 hi E. M. Forster’s Reconfigured Gaze and the Creation of a Homoerotic Subjectivity A . A . Markley Would you care to read my novel? .. .To you it will reveal a new and painful world, into which you will hardly...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2002) 48 (3): 348–361.
Published: 01 September 2002
...Craig Smith Copyright © Hofstra University 2002 m Across the Widest Gulf: Nonhuman Subjectivity in Virginia Woolf’s Flush Craig Smith I n 1933 Virginia W oolf published Flush: A Biography, an experim ent in genre that purports to tell the life story o f Elizabeth...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2004) 50 (3): 324–331.
Published: 01 September 2004
... useful model for the kind of scholarship that does for literary criticism what Pound sought to do for poetry in his day: Make it new. Revising Lyric Subjectivity Lyric Interventions: Feminism, Experimental Poetry, and Contemporary Discourse by Linda A. Kinnahan Iowa City: University of Iowa...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2009) 55 (2): 269–278.
Published: 01 June 2009
...John C. Charles Once You Go Black: Choice, Desire, and the Black American Intellectual , by Reid-Pharr Robert , New York : New York University Press , 2007 . 208 pages. © 2015 by Hofstra University 2009 Review Desire, Agency, and Black American Subjectivity Once You Go...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 131–167.
Published: 01 June 2010
...Brenda S. Helt Copyright © Hofstra University 2010 Bisexuality and Woolf’s Opposition to Theories of Androgyny Passionate Debates on “Odious Subjects”: Bisexuality and Woolf’s Opposition to Theories of Androgyny and Sexual Identity Brenda S. Helt Contemporary scholarly...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 413–442.
Published: 01 December 2006
...Paula E. Geyh Copyright © Hofstra University 2006 From. Cities of Things to Cities of Signs: Urban Spaces and Urban Subjects in Sister Carrie and Manhattan Transfer Paula E. Geyh However the city may really be, beneath this thick coating of signs...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 309–342.
Published: 01 June 2013
...Rebecca Rauve Davis © 2015 by Hofstra University 2013 Stream and Destination: Husserl, Subjectivity, and Dorothy Richardson’s Pilgrimage Stream and Destination: Husserl, Subjectivity, and Dorothy Richardson’s Pilgrimage Rebecca Rauve Davis About fifty years ago, Shiv Kumar and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2013) 59 (3): 465–493.
Published: 01 September 2013
...Maren Linett © 2015 by Hofstra University 2013 “Seeing, seeing, seeing”: Deafness, Knowledge,and Subjectivity in Elizabeth Bowen “Seeing, seeing, seeing”: Deafness, Knowledge, and Subjectivity in Elizabeth Bowen Maren Linett In What is Posthumanism?, Cary Wolfe enlists Temple...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2015) 61 (1): 63–91.
Published: 01 March 2015
...Erin Kay Penner In The Wave s, the 1931 novel she called a “playpoem,” Virginia Woolf enacts a drama of modern elegy, using multiple elegists and elegiac subjects to challenge the terms by which speakers and subjects worthy of poetic mourning are defined. In doing so, Woolf frees the genre from the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2016) 62 (3): 289–308.
Published: 01 September 2016
... postmodern relationship between the author and his or her characters. Such a newly envisioned dynamic has been understood as fiction’s response to the theoretical debate about the so-called death of the author and, more broadly, to the posthumanist discourse on the dissolution of the liberal-humanist subject...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2018) 64 (1): 53–78.
Published: 01 March 2018
... of Wicomb’s narrative experiment. That experiment aims at recovering the residues of female subjectivity repressed by the antiapartheid struggle, while also refusing to reincorporate women as “subjects” of homogeneous history. By explicitly naming and engaging the experiments of Joseph Conrad and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2018) 64 (2): 191–222.
Published: 01 June 2018
... further develop her politics of description; poems such as “Florida” (1939) and “Brazil, January 1, 1502” (1959) invoke an indigenous American subject whose calls of distress are an ambivalent figure for the poet’s voice and vocation. Through their attempts to construct or attend to that voice, these...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2016) 62 (2): 119–144.
Published: 01 June 2016
.... The novel’s narrator, when his spine is twisted forward by the chemical toxins, adopts the name “Animal.” In contesting Western definitions of what constitutes a human, he helps to reimagine postcolonial activism by broadening its coalition to include nonhuman subjects. Sinha’s version of postcolonial...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2016) 62 (3): 247–270.
Published: 01 September 2016
... purgatory. Beckett’s purgatory in the novel, however, is a failure by design: if purgatory represents the opportunity for expiation and for an eventual end of suffering, in Watt’s purgatory the possibility of such opportunity is a subject of mockery. “Beckett in Purgatory” thus offers Watt as a case study...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2016) 62 (4): 379–402.
Published: 01 December 2016
... poem Trilogy , her personae’s affective, local experiences of historical art and artifacts in museums (and museological spaces) contest the authority of the disinterested “pure gaze” assumed by the museum’s ideal seeing subject. In these works, the museum functions as a space for cultural engagements...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2016) 62 (3): 271–288.
Published: 01 September 2016
... still remain close. I make the claim that, as with speaking in place of another, speaking for oneself also entails the production of an other, and that these efforts to read and give voices to dogs point toward the rupture of the self-reflective human subject. In featuring their failed attempts to write...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 1–20.
Published: 01 March 2017
... Christian subject position. Foe highlights this subversion through the nonpresence of Friday, showing the work of colonial Christianity still in transition, convulsed by the repetition of what it is attempting to subordinate in secret: the non-Christian other whose sacrifice cannot be openly acknowledged...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 239–266.
Published: 01 September 2017
...Heather Arvidson This essay traces a critique of anti-sentimentalist leftist impersonality in the critically underestimated and best-selling novel The Unpossessed (1934). Tess Slesinger’s satire parodies the deadened affect that results from programmatic refusals of subjectivity and personal life...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2018) 64 (4): 387–412.
Published: 01 December 2018
... lyric subjectivity—a way of telling one’s own scandalous story through someone else’s words, even words intended as hostile, discovering poetic and sexual pleasures where others see only anxiety and dread. Copyright © 2018 Hofstra University 2018 The Changing Light at Sandover Cold War...