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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 367–390.
Published: 01 December 2006
...Malcolm Woodland Copyright © Hofstra University 2006 41 Wordsworth Stranded: The Prelude and Mark Strand s “The Untelling” Malcolm Woodland “Say,” I said. “If translation is a kind of reading, the assump­ tion or transformation of one personal idiom into another...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2013) 59 (1): 1–36.
Published: 01 March 2013
...Eric Strand Copyright © Hofstra University 2013 Eric Strand The Last Frontier: Burroughs’s Early Work and International Tourism Eric Strand William S. Burroughs’s image as a subversive avant-garde writer, uncompromisingly contesting all forms of social control, has...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2014) 60 (4): 538–544.
Published: 01 December 2014
... outset, namely what might be seen as deep incom- patibilities between the two strands of thought. Granted that on a first reading Levinas and the postcolonialists seem to be describing the same thing. The root of Levinas’s thought is the subject’s encounter with the other: the Levinasian subject...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2008) 54 (4): 448–471.
Published: 01 December 2008
..., beginning with the first page’s reference to “the diagram” and “a strand of rotted hulks” (Flow 3), allusions to Bishop’s “cobbled courtyard like a diagram” (CP 57) and Dingle Harbor’s “rot­ ting hulks” (58). Indeed, it may be that Ashbery turns to Bishop—perhaps even literally on the first...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2007) 53 (1): 74–78.
Published: 01 March 2007
... journalism at the turn of the century, outlines the various strands of this discussion, tracing concerns about the debased nature of the public sphere that resulted from the perceived threat of a newly enlarged and literate “public” seen often as “volatile, unpredictable, inscrutable” (18...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2006) 52 (2): 237–240.
Published: 01 June 2006
... 5 respectively); and in part 3, “Going after Apocalypse,” the notion is given a comparatist treatment (a final chapter links Stevens’s apocalyptic poetry to Jorie Graham’s The Errancy, and a brief afterword takes up the work of Mark Strand and John Ashbery). Yet despite the admirably...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2011) 57 (1): 123–131.
Published: 01 March 2011
... estrangement. In doing so, Scheingold of- fers a number of brief, often footnoted, statements that clarify the way he conceives “the political novel.” Such qualifiers serve an important func- tion, since criticism of political fiction has a few distinguishable strains. The first strand—perhaps initially...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2013) 59 (4): 666–673.
Published: 01 December 2013
..., glitter tarnishes. “Stranded in the city, men and women exist neither here nor there, whether they have abandoned their neighbourhood, a simpler way of life, or come from far away” (36). 668 Review Mapping the restless, indeterminate spaces of characters in an urban landscape also...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2002) 48 (2): 174–190.
Published: 01 June 2002
.... The Wanderings of Oisin was a symbolist lyric awakened to epic de­ signs by the imperatives of cultural reconstruction. Thereafter,Yeats’s na­ tionalist and epic impulses were increasingly channeled into prose and verse dramas like Cathleen ni Houlihan (1902) and On Baile’s Strand (1904...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 352–372.
Published: 01 September 2015
... strands of the novel’s strange and estranging fictional world (2005, 31). As stage Irishman, Murphy will go to elaborate lengths to avoid work. However, as his fiancée Celia Kelly insists that their relationship and continuing cohabitation are dependent upon Murphy gaining paid employment, the clearest...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 365–369.
Published: 01 September 2017
... substantial tinkering, a number of terms that contemporary literary theory has largely tossed aside, terms essentially concerned with the axiological and phenomenological dimensions of reading poetry: the language of value, experience, and imaginative absorption. Altieri sees in the strand of high analytic...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2002) 48 (4): 461–486.
Published: 01 December 2002
... as he walks along Sandymount Strand in the “Pro­ teus” chapter is the question of perception: how does one conceive the world if not through the eyes? The visible world is an “ineluctable mo­ dality”—providing signs to read (or “signatures”) even in natural flotsam and jetsam: “seaspawn and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2007) 53 (4): 535–539.
Published: 01 December 2007
... of Shay and Sister Edgar that resists pressing the text’s multiplicities into single strands and instead elucidates how “despair and hope, anxiety and comedy, horror and irony” are as complementary as Bobby Thomson and Ralph Branca, the hero and sad sack spotlighted in the novel’s opening set...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2005) 51 (1): 105–109.
Published: 01 March 2005
... passive Asian woman stereotype” (219). This concluding chapter nicely encompasses one strand of Davidson’s argument: Olson initiates a process that allows Cha to arrive, even as Cha takes the measure of a host of complexities that Olson could not have foreseen. Though Davidson notes in passing...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2005) 51 (3): 316–340.
Published: 01 September 2005
... totalitarian regimes and de­ humanizing technology, and the concomitant fragmentation of the self), Moore represents a different and more optimistic strand of sociopolitical engagement with the ethical and religious challenges of the twentieth century, the “intrinsic promises and potencies...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2012) 58 (3): 540–545.
Published: 01 September 2012
... for his hypothesis is a bit uncertain. At the outset, he asserts broadly that “post- modern fiction is, in short, the literary symptom” (4) of the nuclear age; later he seems more circumspect, suggesting that “one strand of American fiction was influenced” (161) by the shadow of nuclear...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2013) 59 (1): 157–163.
Published: 01 March 2013
... who is superior to pure genetic strains (122). The “racial memories” that Goy inherits from her parents are “inharmonious” (130) strands that cancel each other out and reveal the fictional nature of all racial categories. Vetter carefully traces Loy’s ad- aptation of eugenicist theories of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 267–298.
Published: 01 September 2017
... artistic gaze begins its work of mediation. When he gazes at her on the strand, he singles her out as one of several “gayclad lightclad figures of children and girls”; he then apprehends her as something magical, a “seabird,” and from there he generates an image that “passe[s] into his soul for ever...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2009) 55 (2): 232–254.
Published: 01 June 2009
... kinesthetic techniques in “Proteus” ’s inte- rior monologue complicates usual interpretations. “Proteus” opens with Stephen “reading” Sandymount Strand and reflecting that the sense of sight, the “modality of the visible,” must be supplemented by a “modality of the audible.” Applied to writing...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 233–247.
Published: 01 September 2007
... her claims on several fronts. He argues, for instance, that she sets up a simplified 242 Introduction: After Postmodernism “dichotomy between metafictionists and realists” (28), an assertion that ignores her actual tripartite division of contemporary fictional strands. He contends...