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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2000) 46 (2): 214–237.
Published: 01 June 2000
... memoir in a suburban hotel in London, Ralph Singh, the first-person narrator of The Mimic Men, intends his work to be a representative autobiography of a Car­ ibbean politician in the 1950s. The exhilaration of becoming a cabinet min­ 220 NAIPAUL’S THE MIMIC MEN ister...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2002) 48 (2): 191–214.
Published: 01 June 2002
... proletar­ ian fiction” (qtd. in Graham and Singh 8) of the time, Ellison wrote arti­ cles in support of the Communist Party and in defense of social realism as an aesthetic form. Early in his literary career, he defended the protest fiction of authors like Richard Wright, who attempted to link the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2007) 53 (4): 488–517.
Published: 01 December 2007
... as the condition for the enrichment of intersubjectivity. 493 Matthew Mutter In order to distinguish this mode of“discussing language itself” from similar phenomena in the life of the cult, it is worth juxtaposing this pas­ sage with an account that Singh, one of the cult members...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2015) 61 (2): 232–263.
Published: 01 June 2015
... compradors—just as Naipaul himself might be seen as mediating between the worlds of colonial and postcolonial anglophone literatures. We also learn that Kalasinga’s proper name is Harbans Singh, the same name as the hapless politician in Naipaul’s early novel about Trinidad’s first general election, The...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 238–266.
Published: 01 June 2012
... politics. In the words of Nikhil Pal Singh, “the dominant flavor of contemporary discussions of race and nation reproduce . . . liberal nationalist conventions” which “monopolize the discussion of civic identity and political expression at the expense of a full rendering of black political...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 470–491.
Published: 01 December 2000
... idea that finds renewed expression in another ghetto magician, Picture Singh, who is “no lover of democracy” (400). However, this “universal” com­ munity unquestionably privileges masculinity, as we see in Hummingbird’s ability to attract “members” by inducing erections with his voice (“Padma...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 545–568.
Published: 01 December 2001
... charis­ ma and vision of a single figure. Midnight’s Children presents a series of utopian communities—Mian Abdullah’s Free Islam Convocation, Saleem’s Midnight’s Children Conference, and Picture Singh’s magicians’ ghetto, 551 John J. Su to name but three—that all share a common feature: they...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): 197–221.
Published: 01 June 2014
... color. King’s hope for a future in which skin color does not restrict his children’s aspirations, in the hands of the New Right in the 1980s and 1990s, became a tool for the promotion of neoliberal “colorblindness” right now. As Nikhil Singh clarifies, in discussing this co-optation of civil...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 510–544.
Published: 01 December 2001
... “people whose hold on reality was absolute” (476).Yes, Saleem tells us that Picture Singh, the commu­ nist leader, was antidemocratic, but Saleem also tells us, “I can say, with utter certainty, that Picture Singh was the greatest man I ever met” (474). Still, even if his claims are somewhat...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 467–509.
Published: 01 December 2001
... versed. About New York,Vina objects, “It can’t be the edge as well as the center” (378);4 butYul Singh (NewYork’s King Hades) informs her,“Sure it can, my pretty . . . take a look around” (378). But if this is true for New York, it is also true for Bombay. Geographical coordinates are not thus...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2018) 64 (3): 371–378.
Published: 01 September 2018
... impressive body of recent scholarship by Kate A. Baldwin, Mary Dudziak, Kevin Gaines, Richard Iton, Nikhil Singh, Penny Von Eschen, and Alan Wald that has transformed conceptions of midcentury African American cultural production, revealing a cultural and political sensibility that shaped and was shaped by...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 245–253.
Published: 01 June 2010
... through his or her specifically modern perspective. For instance, Sawhney develops Hazariprasad Dvivedi’s strong modern reading of Kālidāsa’s play and critic Namwar Singh’s gloss on Dvivedi’s interpretive refraction—his “desire to discover” a particular political consciousness in Kālidāsa’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2019) 65 (1-2): 1–22.
Published: 01 March 2019
... has focused on notions of racial alterity through the perspectives of postcolonial theory, US race theory, or critiques of US imperialism in the Global South ( Jay 2010 ; Sharpe 1995 ; Singh and Schmidt 2000 ). In addition, an attention to connections between (post)socialist nations and the United...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2017) 63 (2): 115–140.
Published: 01 June 2017
... “Civil Rights Movement” and “civil rights literature.” Cultural historians such as Robin D. G. Kelley (1996) , Penial Joseph (2000) , Nikhil Pal Singh (2004) , and Jacquelyn Dowd Hall (2005) have stressed the historical and political problems associated with collapsing the short Civil Rights...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 462–492.
Published: 01 December 2010
... Naipaul’s novels, The Mimic Men, in which Singh, the novel’s protagonist, dreams of  “retirement [on] an old cocoa estate”:7 467 Yi-Ping Ong There are freshwater springs that make miniature waterfalls over mossy rocks and then run clear and cold and shallow in their own...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2009) 55 (1): 1–35.
Published: 01 March 2009
... own religious tenets, but politically the Sanatan Dharma was dominant, especially after it united with another major Hindu organization to form the explicitly political Sanatan Dharma Maha Sabha (Singh 54). Such religiously ori­ ented traditionalist groups were but part of an organizational...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 596–618.
Published: 01 December 2001
... Children and Shame” 2-3), but rather in its extended verbal and political satire. Literature in Hindi and Urdu has had its share of postindependence sat­ irists such as Krishan Chandar and Rajinder Singh Bedi; but Rushdie is unusual among English-language satirists for not attempting the bilin­...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2002) 48 (2): 215–238.
Published: 01 June 2002
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2015) 61 (2): 147–172.
Published: 01 June 2015
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 March 2000