1-20 of 304 Search Results for

sign

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2010) 56 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 March 2010
...Murray McArthur Copyright © Hofstra University 2010 Symptom and Sign: Janet, Freud, Eliot, and the Literary Mandate of Laughter Symptom and Sign: Janet, Freud, Eliot, and the Literary Mandate of Laughter Murray McArthur In 1906, T. S. Eliot’s freshman year at Harvard, Pierre...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 413–442.
Published: 01 December 2006
...Paula E. Geyh Copyright © Hofstra University 2006 From. Cities of Things to Cities of Signs: Urban Spaces and Urban Subjects in Sister Carrie and Manhattan Transfer Paula E. Geyh However the city may really be, beneath this thick coating of signs...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2016) 62 (3): 247–270.
Published: 01 September 2016
... for how the trauma of war and, indeed, of neutrality, of missing the war, embeds itself in literary language that signs itself as “unreadable.” Copyright © Hofstra University 2016 Dante Irish Emergency neutrality trauma World War II In Canto III of the Inferno , just outside the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 462–492.
Published: 01 December 2010
... “signs for Thrushcross Grange,” each bearing “the name of the firm that had put the sign up”:  “local bottlers of Coca- 462Twentieth-Century Literature 56.4 Winter 2010 462 The Language of Advertising and the Novel: Naipaul’s A House for Mr. Biswas Cola,” “Amal (the American bauxite...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 285–290.
Published: 01 June 2011
.... These theorists argue that formerly discreet media such as newspapers, television, cinema, advertising, design, and the internet are increasingly produced in convergent strategies and patterns, enveloping consumers of visual/aural culture in a seamless lifeworld of mediated signs. This wall of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2004) 50 (4): 337–367.
Published: 01 December 2004
..., indifferent world a motivated, coherent narrative; its claim of grandiosity for the object of aggression; its reduction of the world to a stable binary in which all signs take their meaning through their relation to the paranoid—are quite explicitly rendered as the basis of the novel’s “plot...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2013) 59 (3): 465–493.
Published: 01 September 2013
... Grammatology, Derrida has shown that western culture’s privileging of speech over writing stems from a concomitant privileging of presence over absence. This critique does not analyze deafness or signed languages, but as H-Dirksen Bauman has suggested, Derrida’s analysis enables the theoretical...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2011) 57 (3-4): 391–422.
Published: 01 December 2011
... first time since Charlotte’s surgery. In response to a wry joke by Oscar, Charlotte remarks that she laughed, my head back, so that suddenly I was looking above the buildings, up at the winter sky. And then I saw the sign. It snagged my gaze and held it, an old advertisement...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2018) 64 (4): 511–517.
Published: 01 December 2018
..., or mother” (6) is the trait d’union that, in chapter 1, leads Vicks to discuss Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Derrida as the most prominent theorists of nothing in the twentieth century. The chapter opens with a fascinating history of zero as a mathematical concept and sign from the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 248–272.
Published: 01 September 2007
..., references to M exican things and places simply add to the cluttered accumulation o f signs that point to dead ends rather than progress. By contrast, Mexican history, people, and culture are the lifeblood ofYamashita’s Southern California, w hich is literally being transformed by the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 545–550.
Published: 01 December 2010
... into emplotted sign and whole narrative” (8)—an entry into signi- fication that it would seem pre-Christian and non-Christian frameworks cannot provide. In an aside on traditional Hawaiian mythology, Wilson remarks that “premissionary” Hawaiian religion appears to be “lacking in . . . figures of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2005) 51 (1): 105–109.
Published: 01 March 2005
... feminization” threatens agency that is presumed to be “the domain of strong masculine figures” (8). For Davidson,“citing masculinity” is virtually inevitable during these decades in which a masculine norm always looms as a “solution” to signs of conflict or threats of disorder. Quick to identify...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 272–276.
Published: 01 June 2011
... apparently forwarded this message to Maxwell Perkins, her editor at Scribner’s, in August of 1943, with an endorsement of Hurston’s work (22). Lillios laments that if only Scribner’s had taken the hint and signed Hurston at that time, her career’s trajectory would have been very different. For...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): 267–272.
Published: 01 June 2014
... cultural logic of late capitalism, Kelly re-engages questions of agency and temporality denied by Jameson’s assertion of a de-centered human subject. Building upon the work of Andrew Hoberek and Timothy Bewes, Kelly suggests that contemporary critique should be attuned to signs and symptoms of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 387–395.
Published: 01 December 2000
... Television. It was so serious, such an Event, a sure sign that nothing was happening. Only the Danes thought to perform a millennial parody, which ended with the queen of Denmark being assassi­ nated! What was truly noteworthy, though, was not how little took place, but how littie was expected...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2002) 48 (4): 427–460.
Published: 01 December 2002
... T-Model was put on the market,” which begins to explain the significance of the letters “A.F.” Divulging these crucial facts, the Di­ rector “made a sign of the T on his stomach and all the students fol­ lowed suit” (BNW 27).6This absurd gesture confirms Ford’s divine status, but...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2011) 57 (1): 105–113.
Published: 01 March 2011
... national debt became un- thinkable in the wake of the Civil War. The endurance of this insistence on geographical sanctity is a sign either that the trauma of the Civil War is still with us (i.e., that the US continues to need a recuperative narra- tive about national destiny) or that the US...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 264–271.
Published: 01 June 2011
... of the nation, women were told; as a Calumet Baking Powder recipe book put it, “Food will win the war. Don’t waste it!” (33). Classes in domestic science were organized and participants supplied with uniforms, while over fourteen million women signed pledge cards prom- ising to “obey the food...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 530–544.
Published: 01 December 2010
... hotel’s segregationist policies, Arturo signs the hotel register. “We don’t allow Mexicans in this hotel,” she says, adding “Nor Jews.” Significantly, it is with the very next line that Arturo announces his consent to these practices. In a simple but unmistakably assertive statement, Arturo notes...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2006) 52 (3): 275–305.
Published: 01 September 2006
... footlocker in Bangor, Maine (301), most of us attend to the words of Atwood’s protagonist innocently enough: our familiarity with the ways of the first-person narrator largely annuls any sense of the paradox involved in reading the signs of Offred’s putative orality; that is, until the epilogue...