1-20 of 172 Search Results for

sex

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2017) 63 (2): 141–166.
Published: 01 June 2017
..., as in most Pynchon criticism, their analysis shifts the focus away from sexuality and instead foregrounds countercultural politics, narrative innovation, and individual liberties. When instances of nonnormative sex do enter their analysis, Herman and Weisenburger uniformly read them as perverse...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 287–321.
Published: 01 September 2009
...Thomas Heise © 2015 by Hofstra University 2009 Degenerate Sex and the City: Djuna Barnes’s Urban Underworld Degenerate Sex and the City: Djuna Barnes’s Urban Underworld Thomas Heise In a remarkable but largely overlooked 1918 interview with New York City Police Commissioner...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 597–617.
Published: 01 December 2009
...Deirdre Coleman Copyright © Hofstra University 2009 The “Dog-Man”: Race, Sex, Species, and Lineage in Coetzee’s Disgrace The “Dog-Man”: Race, Sex, Species, and Lineage in Coetzee’s Disgrace Deirdre Coleman In J. M. Coetzee’s most recent novel, Summertime, Sophie Denoël, one of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 360–368.
Published: 01 June 2013
...Matthew Eatough Bloomsbury, Modernism, and the Reinvention of Intimacy , by Wolfe Jesse , Cambridge University Press , 2011 . 272 pages. © 2015 by Hofstra University 2013 Matthew Eatough Accommodating Intimacy, Compromising Sex Bloomsbury, Modernism, and the Reinvention of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 305–329.
Published: 01 September 2015
... the hyena is a marker of ambiguity and indeterminacy implicitly bound up with questions of race, sex and sexuality, and ethics. Following Forster’s language closely, the article illustrates how Forster links the figure of the hyena together with a thematics of spectrality that crosses cultural...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 131–167.
Published: 01 June 2010
...-expression rather than authorial strategy. In her work of the 1920s, Woolf challenged trends to construe same-sex desire as a distinguishing characteristic of a sexual identity type and also es- sentialist ideas about male and female character traits underlying theories of androgyny. Against these...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 20–38.
Published: 01 March 2001
...” (Graham 40). But fine works by Alan Tomlinson on Owen and Shelley and Keith V. Comer on Owen and Whitman suggest that the complex subject of Owen’s relationship to the tradition can still be a fruitful sub­ ject of inquiry. The role of Owen’s attraction to his own sex is often evaded...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 148–179.
Published: 01 June 2011
... estrangement of gender from heteronormative conventions; to specify who does what to whom is to miss Hemingway’s radical dissociation of gender from genital sex. After 148Twentieth-Century Literature 57.2 Summer 2011 148 Hemingway, Literalism, and Transgender Reading this merging...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): vi–x.
Published: 01 June 2010
...- nonexclusionary polymorphous mutability of desire” in order to set up the essay’s ambitious plan to offer us a new and newly produc- tive way to read representations of same-sex desire in Woolf’s work. Courageously eschewing Woolf critics’ frequent use of autobiog- raphy as an interpretive tool, it posits...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2013) 59 (4): 596–618.
Published: 01 December 2013
... David, the protagonist of Giovanni’s Room, denies his love for the Italian bartender Giovanni, an act which sends Giovanni into a downward spiral that ends with his execution for murder. Crucial to understanding why these stories of same-sex love end horrifically is yet another similarity, that...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 492–512.
Published: 01 December 2000
... epigrams. The first suggests that, in the book of nature and Western culture, life originates in the male-female dyad. The second suggests that the end of life is apocalyptic in one of two ways. Topically, rev­ elations occur in the reports of sex scandals in the late-Victorian press. More...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2014) 60 (3): 273–304.
Published: 01 September 2014
... wherein all the elements of adulthood are present or in the process of emerging and that this process of emergence follows a path predetermined by natural instincts. Although modern sex researchers disagreed about the nature of juvenile sexual development, their theories of childhood development...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): vii–xi.
Published: 01 June 2011
... Conspicuous Destruction” and “Flannery O’Connor in Drag.” She served as the editor of PMLA from 2006-2011. Professor Yaeger writes: My favorite story by Sherman Alexie describes a happy, androgynous John Wayne. This is a movie star who weeps when he has sex and asks Etta, the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2001) 47 (2): 217–240.
Published: 01 June 2001
... determined that “it is quite certain that it would suggest to the minds of the young of either sex, or even to persons of more advanced years, thoughts of a most im­ pure and libidinous character” (371).This harsh rule became the neme­ 218 The Obscenity Standard and Ulysses sis...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2009) 55 (2): 175–208.
Published: 01 June 2009
... Gillian . . . because it’s the nearest he can ever get to fucking Stuart.” That is, because Oliver’s “queer” desire for Stuart cannot be expressed, Gillian serves as a mediator, an object through which inappropriate same-sex desire may be triangulated. If this is the case, it may not be Gillian...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2001) 47 (2): 169–196.
Published: 01 June 2001
... calls homoness desig­ nates “a mode of connectedness” that can only absurdly be reduced to sexual preference, if homoness can even be said to be “relevant to love between the sexes” (Homos 147), involving a “mobility” that “should create a kind of community that can never be...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2006) 52 (3): 347–351.
Published: 01 September 2006
... characters’ desire to switch places, which is, Fantina admits, “common but not exclusive to masochism” (47), seems constitutive of sex and love in general—Freud’s “oceanic” impulse— and not specific to masochism. Why then is masoch­ ism the key to Hemingway’s sexuality? Fantina is at his most...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2004) 50 (2): 192–206.
Published: 01 June 2004
... Winterson’s work with the creation of narrative voice, a voice that often enacts a highly ambivalent and ambiguous relationship to the name that purportedly acts as its cul­ tural and ontological signifier. Her 1989 novel Sexing the Cherry can be seen as perhaps the most successful instance of her...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 453–469.
Published: 01 December 2000
... an object like the others swimming in the circle of his gaze—an armchair, a grey carpet, a lamp” ( 12° ) . The shared tendency to alienation from self—the basis of the book’s sordid ecstatic theme—finds repercussions in a range of states involving the body, sex, drunkenness, amnesia, and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 391–412.
Published: 01 December 2006
... Robin the best, it’s to you she turns. — The doctor to Nora, Nightwood (152) I n the midst of the baroque, the haphazard, the seemingly gratuitous flourishes of Dr. Matthew O ’Connor, Nightwood foists upon its reader a set of propositions about same-sex love...