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satanic

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2008) 54 (3): 339–361.
Published: 01 September 2008
...Neil ten Kortenaar Copyright © Hofstra University 2008 w Fearful Symmetry: Salman Rushdie and Prophetic Newness Neil ten Kortenaar I n Salman Rushdie’s The Satanic Verses a disembodied voice asks, “How does newness come into the world? How is it born?” (8).The question...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2001) 47 (4): 596–618.
Published: 01 December 2001
...Shailja Sharma Copyright © Hofstra University 2002 Salman Rushdie: The Ambivalence of Migrancy Shailja Sharma I n her essay on The Satanic Verses, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak tempo­ rarily brackets her discussion of the Rushdie affair in order to “attempt the impossible: a reading...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2003) 49 (4): 449–471.
Published: 01 December 2003
... her by the interlocking claims of class, gender, and presumptive heterosexuality. She finally calls out, “No! You shan’t get me. I won’t go back. I won’t. . . . Oh! Is there no help?” (151). And into the novel sails Satan, figured here as “a kind of black knight, wandering about...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2001) 47 (4): 431–443.
Published: 01 December 2001
... to the political dynamics of the 1980s than to Rushdie’s own work) it was The Satanic Verses and the storm around it that provoked more discussions, in more countries, about the status of the literary than perhaps any other work of our time. The 1993 French publication Pour Rushdie: Cent intel­ lectuels...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2016) 62 (2): 240–245.
Published: 01 June 2016
... Catholic novel by the eminent right-wing polemicist and sometime celebrant of radical anti-Semitism, Georges Bernanos. The novel, published in 1926, is Sous le soleil de Satan (whose second section is titled “La Tentation du désespoir”), and it periodically resurfaces in Sollors’s book as if to say...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2001) 47 (4): 467–509.
Published: 01 December 2001
... as an introduction to the film, page 9). On the other hand, Scyllan gre­ nades, rifles, pistols, land mines, and nuclear bombs—harnessed to un­ stable, witchy people (mostly women, naturally)—shatter the lives and identities of protagonists in Satanic Verses and The Ground Beneath. The Moor’s Last Sigh has...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2016) 62 (1): 56–74.
Published: 01 March 2016
..., satin and vacant. You have given me the shell, Satan,—carbonic amulet Sere of the sun exploded in the sea. (32–35) At leisure, the speaker is empowered by the dark power of Satan, figured as a black amulet paradoxically “sere” or dry as a sun that has exploded in the water—evaporating all...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2001) 47 (4): 545–568.
Published: 01 December 2001
... of it. To claim collective authorship implicitly claims collective responsibility, a point that becomes even more relevant in the case of The Satanic Verses.16 Fi­ nally, we should be skeptical about Saleem’s claim of originality. He asks his audience to perform a task that after all is part...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2013) 59 (1): 181–188.
Published: 01 March 2013
... attention. Even so, Spencer finds some urgency in returning to the messages of The Satanic Verses (1988) and its analysis of multicultural Britain under Thatcher. Spencer suggests that Rushdie’s novel provides a timely correc- tive to the pernicious clash-of-civilizations perspective that has...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2001) 47 (2): 197–216.
Published: 01 June 2001
... of Joyce’s modernism. He exam­ ines how Salman Rushdie recasts Joyce in The Satanic Verses as a way to “clarify the intersection between the postmodern and the postcolonial and [to suggest] the importance of the dialectics of colonialism in the formation of modernist and postmodernist fiction” (130...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2009) 55 (4): 597–617.
Published: 01 December 2009
... to the satanic; he identifies with it. If he were to choose a totem it would be the snake. He has even made an academic study of the origins of the Faust legend. At the conclusion of his class on Lara he urges his students to see that, rather than condemn the hero as a being “with whom there is something...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2000) 46 (4): 492–512.
Published: 01 December 2000
... in the Incarnation. (190) Identified with the demonic power of “Satan,” she is specifically the harlot- priestess of pagan belief. Her prostitution consists in the fact that she is “in communication (by sacred prostitution) with the religious and spiritual powers, with the satanic sources, and esoterism...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2012) 58 (2): 355–364.
Published: 01 June 2012
... . . . and the polyvocal speaker at the moment of narration” (116). This tenuous “I” limns what one might call the limits of multiculturalism, with Midnight’s Children perpetually failing to enunciate a pluralistic individuality. Trousdale’s penultimate chapter on The Satanic Verses, meanwhile, calls attention...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2000) 46 (1): 115–124.
Published: 01 March 2000
... Wechsler Rushdie, Salman. See Sawhney Sacher-Masoch, Leopold von. See Rado Saltzman, Arthur. “Avid Monsters: The Look of Agony in Contemporary Litera­ ture.” 45.2 (1999): 236-52 Sawhney, Simona. “Satanic Choices: Poetry and Prophecy in Rushdie’s Novel.” 45.3 (1999): 253-77 Schmitt...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2000) 46 (4): 396–404.
Published: 01 December 2000
... tant reflection of the “fire that came down from God out of heaven” (Rev. 20.9) to purify the world of Satan’s deceptions just before the rising of the dead. The apocalyptic scenario has its destructive and emancipatory modes, and a symbolic trajectory of scenes, figures, and actions...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2009) 55 (4): 572–596.
Published: 01 December 2009
...” (9). While he seems disgusted with the social order of which he is a part and possesses a clear-eyed estimation of its failings (it is “diabolic,” “satanic,” a “collective madness” [8 yet he also seems to critique the necessary failure of idealists from the viewpoint of a resigned...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2008) 54 (2): 129–165.
Published: 01 June 2008
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2000) 46 (2): 238–268.
Published: 01 June 2000
... of soap and the Pears’s logo to colored reproductions of this painting, which depicts Millais’s young grandson blowing bubbles, and plastered these posters all over London. This use of art deeply offended the English bourgeois art public. In her popular novel The Sorrows of Satan or The Strange...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2001) 47 (4): 510–544.
Published: 01 December 2001
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2017) 63 (1): 1–20.
Published: 01 March 2017
...). For Freud, the father is of course God, with the older brother paralleling the Satanic figure in relation to the younger brother as the Christ figure. 4 See Freud 1939 , 102–7. Freud is, however, also focused on how Christian doctrine incorporates its excessive other into a religious tradition...