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saleem

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 545–568.
Published: 01 December 2001
... Lukács (126) What I tried to do was to set up a tension in [Midnight’s Chil­ dren], a paradoxical opposition between the form and content of the narrative. The story of Saleem does indeed lead him to de­ spair. But the story is told in a manner designed to echo, as closely as...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 470–491.
Published: 01 December 2000
... because membership in the Islamic nation—the umma—is not restricted by birth (130). In Salman Rushdie’s M idnight’s Children, Saleem Sinai also draws on the revolutionary legacy of apocalyptic nationalism as an obvious frame for his account of India’s struggle of liberation: “I shall have to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 510–544.
Published: 01 December 2001
... “people whose hold on reality was absolute” (476).Yes, Saleem tells us that Picture Singh, the commu­ nist leader, was antidemocratic, but Saleem also tells us, “I can say, with utter certainty, that Picture Singh was the greatest man I ever met” (474). Still, even if his claims are somewhat...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 355–364.
Published: 01 June 2012
...) charge, constantly doubling back on itself. Trousdale ultimately argues, however, that Rushdie’s cosmopolitanism fails in the Bombay novels because the individual can never supersede the group. For example, Saleem’s suppression of Gandhi throughout Midnight’s Children signals an aversion to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 431–443.
Published: 01 December 2001
... ancestry and deceptive appearances. Rushdie’s Saleem gave it a new and provocative spin by dramatizing this dual de­ scent not just thematically but stylistically as well. When Midnight’s Children first appeared, we could not have foreseen how precisely this couple of the Jtrangi-desi would emerge...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 569–595.
Published: 01 December 2001
... into an aesthetic vision that, although never wholly successful, attempts to allay what Saleem in Midnight’s Children calls the “national longing for form.” Rushdie may have borrowed the trope of the palimpsest from Neh­ ru, who pictured Indian history as a palimpsest of successful...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 596–618.
Published: 01 December 2001
... hybridity.4 Conversely, one must recognize that it is precisely Rushdie’s free­ wheeling use of hybridity, particularly linguistic hybridity, that gives his work its iconoclastic, transgressive edge. Saleem’s challenge to authority in Midnight’s Children is evident not just in his abilities as a...