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rushdie

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2008) 54 (3): 339–361.
Published: 01 September 2008
...Neil ten Kortenaar Copyright © Hofstra University 2008 w Fearful Symmetry: Salman Rushdie and Prophetic Newness Neil ten Kortenaar I n Salman Rushdie’s The Satanic Verses a disembodied voice asks, “How does newness come into the world? How is it born?” (8).The question...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2001) 47 (4): 431–443.
Published: 01 December 2001
...Sabina Sawhney; Simona Sawhney Introduction Reading Rushdie after September 11, 2001 Sabina Sawhney and Simona Sawhney T h e appearance of yet another collection of essays on Rushdie’s work will no doubt seem odd to many people. Isn’t there too much already written about Rushdie...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2001) 47 (4): 596–618.
Published: 01 December 2001
...Shailja Sharma Copyright © Hofstra University 2002 Salman Rushdie: The Ambivalence of Migrancy Shailja Sharma I n her essay on The Satanic Verses, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak tempo­ rarily brackets her discussion of the Rushdie affair in order to “attempt the impossible: a reading...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2012) 58 (2): 267–295.
Published: 01 June 2012
...Eric D. Smith Copyright © Hofstra University 2012 Worldlessness, Utopia, and the Void in Rushdie’s Grimus “Fictions Where a Man Could Live”: Worldlessness, Utopia, and the Void in Rushdie’s Grimus Eric D. Smith From that day to this, I have thought of myself as a wholly...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2000) 46 (4): 470–491.
Published: 01 December 2000
...Teresa Heffernan Apocalyptic Narratives: The Nation in Salman Rushdie’s Midnights Children Teresa Heffernan The radically performative laying down of the law by the legislator must create the very context according to which that law could...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2001) 47 (4): 545–568.
Published: 01 December 2001
.... —Salman Rushdie (Imaginary Homelands 16) E tver since Salman Rushdie described the Indian “national longing for form” in his novel Midnight’s Children (359), questions of form have been a central topic for Rushdie scholarship. Form, or, to use a slightly more specific term, genre, is so central...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2001) 47 (4): 444–466.
Published: 01 December 2001
... with examples of Sufis who have been dubbed heretics for their unorthodox beliefs and either driven into banishment or murdered by jealous tyrants. Salman Rushdie first makes reference to The Conference of the Birds Twentieth-Century Literature 47.4 Winter 2001 444 Haroun and the Sea of Stories...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2001) 47 (4): 467–509.
Published: 01 December 2001
...Rachel Falconer Copyright © Hofstra University 2002 Bouncing Down to the Underworld: Classical Katabasis in The Ground Beneath Her Feet Rachel Falconer I n an essay on Italo Calvino, Rushdie writes that “perhaps the most dominant characteristic of Calvino’s entire output...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2001) 47 (4): 510–544.
Published: 01 December 2001
...Patrick Colm Hogan Copyright © Hofstra University 2002 Midnight's Children: Kashmir and the Politics of Identity Patrick Colm Hogan M . Keith Booker has recently drawn attention to a common ten­ dency in the interpretive criticism of Salman Rushdie, and indeed of much...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2012) 58 (2): 355–364.
Published: 01 June 2012
...Kalyan Nadiminti Nabokov, Rushdie and the Transnational Imagination: Novels of Exile and Alternate Worlds , by Trousdale Rachel , New York : Palgrave Macmillan , 2010 . 252 pages. Copyright © Hofstra University 2012 Review Imagining Rooted Cosmopolitanism Nabokov, Rushdie...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2001) 47 (4): 569–595.
Published: 01 December 2001
...Alexandra W. Schultheis Copyright © Hofstra University 2002 Postcolonial Lack and Aesthetic Promise in The Moor’s Last Sigh Alexandra W. Schultheis I n his documentary film The Riddle of Midnight, Salman Rushdie re­ turns to India 40 years after independence to see...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2013) 59 (1): 181–188.
Published: 01 March 2013
... literature to provide the voice for our times. Modernism’s self-conscious style and outsider sensibility, he argues, is eminently suited to the cosmopolitan project, and it is as mod- ernists that Spencer analyses the authors of his study. These include not only Coetzee and Mo but also Salman Rushdie...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2008) 54 (3): 410–417.
Published: 01 September 2008
... novels. In chapters on Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Kazuo Ishiguro, Salman Rushdie, and W. G. Sebald, Walkowitz develops what she calls a “critical cosmopolitanism,” one that reflects “on the history, uses, and interests of cosmopolitanism in the past” while simultaneously...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2005) 51 (1): 114–122.
Published: 01 March 2005
... 47.3 (2001): 374-390 Hannum, Howard LScared sick looking at it’:A Reading of Nick Adams in the Published Stories.” 47.1 (2001): 92—113 Hays,Tony. See Durham Heaney, Seamus. See Boly Heffernan,Teresa. “Apocalyptic Narratives: The Nation in Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2019) 65 (3): 191–216.
Published: 01 September 2019
... witness to what has been historically unspeakable, and in some ways, unimaginable.” Importantly, the idea of rememory, which entails “both anamnesis and construction,” as Ashraf Rushdy (1990 : 304) observes, “is never only personal but always interpersonal.” While scholars have conceptualized the neo...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2013) 59 (1): 174–180.
Published: 01 March 2013
... with the work of Ashraf Rushdy: “The neo-slave narrative officially begins when we no longer have access to unmediated testimonial accounts of slavery,” whereas “the neo-segregation narrative . . . has not come into sharp focus because . . . not enough historical dis- tance [exists] between...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2018) 64 (3): 275–294.
Published: 01 September 2018
...—as distinct both from the widespread rape that masters inflicted on enslaved women and from socially recognized forms of interracial concubinage, such as plaçage ( Rushdy 2000 , 281). While the burning of official records might make it impossible for Corregidora’s descendants to “prove” their victimizations...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2001) 47 (2): 197–216.
Published: 01 June 2001
... people in the family picture— not just Wal­ cott and Joyce but Rushdie and Joyce, Desai and Woolf, Ondaatje and Stevens, Brathwaite and Eliot, and Ngugi and Conrad—that we can be­ gin to see the complementary but distinct ways that the language and literature of English...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2000) 46 (1): 115–124.
Published: 01 March 2000
... Wechsler Rushdie, Salman. See Sawhney Sacher-Masoch, Leopold von. See Rado Saltzman, Arthur. “Avid Monsters: The Look of Agony in Contemporary Litera­ ture.” 45.2 (1999): 236-52 Sawhney, Simona. “Satanic Choices: Poetry and Prophecy in Rushdie’s Novel.” 45.3 (1999): 253-77 Schmitt...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2000) 46 (4): 387–395.
Published: 01 December 2000
... by writers like Morrison, Salman Rushdie, Angela Carter, Ishmael Reed, Octavia Butler, and Donna Haraway involves acts of self-de­ struction; surgeries, amputations, grafts, and splices; disassembling and re­ forming old myths. When the subaltern speaks, a new self and a new world are formed...