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river

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2015) 61 (2): 232–263.
Published: 01 June 2015
... so, it also engages with a complex of intertexts ranging from the Qur’anic and biblical versions of the Yusuf/Joseph story to Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness . This essay adds V. S. Naipaul’s A Bend in the River to this mix by reading Gurnah’s historical attentiveness as an overwriting of Naipaul’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2009) 55 (1): 36–57.
Published: 01 March 2009
... river carving a narrow channel through rock forms the expanse of a canyon. Willard Spiegelman writes that Graham’s poems, like a river, “branch easily, luminously” (“Nineties” 234); her “syntactic volume and heavy verbal impasto sweep ever onward” (235), and by means of such “torrents of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 72–91.
Published: 01 March 2001
.... — Robert Graves (287) terrain is what remains in the dreaming part of your mind. — Ernest Hemingway, Across the River and into the Trees (92) P a u l Fussell argues that World War I was an inescapable part of post­ war poetry. For instance, he says that Eliots...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 92–113.
Published: 01 March 2001
..., and the tissue placed in his basin (68-69). Later, wounded by shrapnel at the Piave River (276), he identified with the Indian woman being held down for penetration by the steel of his father’s knife. The Caesarian had to be severely dam­ aging, intensifying his natural fear of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2016) 62 (4): 429–447.
Published: 01 December 2016
... torture was an unrecognized and murky component of the military’s internal functioning. The dominant presence of the psychiatrist Dr. W. H. R. Rivers in Regeneration , however, may seem to leave little room for the literary critic to perform much further analysis in a novel in which images and dialogue...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2008) 54 (1): 31–46.
Published: 01 March 2008
... clean water that God separated from the firmament in Genesis is consumed by people whose wastes contaminate rivers that, in turn, pollute the oceans out of which the clouds that produce fresh water are created. Joyce connects the two degenerating cycles through Anna Livia Plurabelle (ALP), an...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2002) 48 (1): 100–115.
Published: 01 March 2002
... washes away “empty bottles, sandwich papers / Silk handkerchiefs, cardboard boxes, cigarette ends” (36), it “sweats / Oil and tar” (39), “The river’s tent is broken” (36), the “nymphs are departed” (36).The tent—interpreted as either sup­ porting framework or dilating absorbent—fails...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 34–55.
Published: 01 March 2000
... language. Thus an affirma­ tion of the maternal voice is aligned with a subtle and cumulative interroga­ tion of the hollowness of the colonial enterprise itself. The text’s disenchantment with conventional rhetoric and social inter­ course culminates, during the up-river sequence, in a stylized...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 434–452.
Published: 01 December 2000
... river’s tent is broken; the last fingers of leaf Clutch and sink into the wet bank. The wind Crosses the brown land, unheard. (11. 173-75) The section closes with the image of Carthage in flames, and repeats the word “burning” five times (11. 307-08, 311). “Death by Water,” which is only...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2003) 49 (1): 103–122.
Published: 01 March 2003
... Tropic o f Cancer I love the great rivers like the Amazon and the Orinoco, where crazy men like Moravagine float on through dream and legend in an open boat and drown in the blind mouths of the river. (Tropic 232) This Moravagine navigating through Tropic of Cancer appears at the very...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2005) 51 (2): 244–248.
Published: 01 June 2005
... Spiegelman’s narrowing of description to landscape and artworks makes perfect sense. But a contemporary such as Derek Walcott, for example, can open his poem “The Glory Trumpeter” with the lines “Old Eddie’s face, wrinkled with river lights, / Looked like a Mississippi man’s.The eyes, / Derisive...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2007) 53 (1): 1–22.
Published: 01 March 2007
... bedsides to ferry them to Hades. The Charles flows into the river Acheron; Boston and Lowell’s ancestors become part of a “familiarized” classical mythology. Bishop greatly admired what she called Lowell’s “family life” poems (One Art 361), but his tendency toward the mythopoeic is challenged...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2017) 63 (4): 427–450.
Published: 01 December 2017
... river from Norfolk. My Brooklyn-Oxford surroundings do not yield much; though if anyone at Pratt library should ‘push the bashful stranger to his food’ your queries will not be deferred” ( SL 342). Moore did return to Norfolk in the summer of 1935, and it seems likely that she went to that small...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2009) 55 (1): 137–144.
Published: 01 March 2009
... her third chapter Orlando examines specific paintings Wharton alludes to in The Custom of the Country (1913), “The Temperate Zone” (1924), and the two-part narrative Hudson River Bracketed (1929) and The Gods Arrive (1932). Describing Undine Spragg of The Custom of the Country as a...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 559–566.
Published: 01 December 2010
... real omitted elements are not the most popular examples—Peduzzi’s suicide from “Out of Season,” the war from “Big Two-Hearted River,” the word abortion from “Hills Like White Elephants”—but rather the subjective feelings of Hemingway’s narrators and characters. In a second pivotal chapter...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2012) 58 (1): 117–140.
Published: 01 March 2012
... early-morning workers,” he “did not feel lost or black or unimportant, but a part of it, contained by it, as a ripple in the river of humanity” (386). The novel concludes with Gordon picking up the union banner of a white organizer who has just been brutally beaten by the police, and continuing...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2006) 52 (3): 347–351.
Published: 01 September 2006
... convincing and illuminating when he’s analyz­ ing the fiction itself. The many excurses into biographical speculation weaken his arguments. In an otherwise compelling analysis of chivalric models of masochistic eroticism in Across the River, Fantina pauses to speculate about Hemingway’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 221–244.
Published: 01 June 2010
.... One’s imagination had been working at half-pressure. . . . Martha had been here before. When a bad time starts, it is as if on a smooth green lawn a toad appears; as if a clear river suddenly floats down a corpse. Before the appearance of the toad, the corpse, one...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2011) 57 (3-4): 423–446.
Published: 01 December 2011
... un- folding drama concerns the annual migration of Sandhill cranes to the area around Kearney, Nebraska, where Mark lives. A section of the Platte River that provides a resting ground to 500,000 cranes every year is under threat of being damaged by a the development of a vast ecotourism resort...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2017) 63 (4): 507–512.
Published: 01 December 2017
... postwar years. Encouraging new ecocritical approaches to this poet of islands, rivers, and rusting infrastructure have also begun to appear. In other ways, too, Auden seems more relevant than ever, quite apart from having been name-checked by Madonna in front of a politically engaged audience of hundreds...