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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 467–509.
Published: 01 December 2001
... understanding lived Twentieth-Century Literature 47.4 Winter 2001 467 Rachel Falconer experience or as a way of structuring narrative. Rai, his first-person nar­ rator, explicitly rejects simple linearity in recounting the story of Or- mus,Vina, and himself: Our lives disconnect and reconnect...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 357–377.
Published: 01 September 2009
... the mere repetition of negro characteristics is apt to make for monotony. (Review of Banjo) 361 Bridget T. Chalk This categorization of Banjo as a “negro” novel confirms the remark of Ray, a character in the novel, that “however advanced, clever, and cul- tivated...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2000) 46 (2): 150–170.
Published: 01 June 2000
..., naive readers found ad­ monitions enough in the “foreword” by fictional psychologist “John Ray, Jr., Ph.D who amply enumerates his disgust for the author of the “Confes­ sion” to follow: “No doubt, he is horrible,” Ray writes, he is abject, he is a shining example of moral leprosy. A desper­...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2011) 57 (3-4): 380–390.
Published: 01 December 2011
... live on and its relation to the sun.” —Ray Brassier, Nihil Unbound (223) In the early morning darkness of May 3, 2003 the New Hampshire geological formation known as the Old Man of the Mountain crumbled to the ground. It was an ignominious end to a famously lofty...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 20–33.
Published: 01 March 2000
... poetic conceit. But even in the sentences that contain these summary statements, the “roselike glow” and the language associated with it produce a rather nonsummary effect: The roselike glow sent forth rays of rhyme; ways, days, blaze, praise, raise. Its rays burned up the world...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2009) 55 (2): 262–268.
Published: 01 June 2009
..., and to gain a critical view of the censoring patterns enacted in his narrative that seek to cover up . . . the other as the abused child Dolores. (160) Mooney seems to have decided to read John Ray’s foreword at face value and to ignore Nabokov’s own insistence that...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2005) 51 (1): 105–109.
Published: 01 March 2005
... other times, Davidson foregrounds texts that actively dispute that masculinist norm, developing outright alternatives that stand apart as extravagant and compelling. At still other times, he locates texts that surround and harass that norm, rais- 106 Review ing questions that puncture its...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 299–328.
Published: 01 September 2017
... changes dramatically, but the material conditions of her writing remain constant. When we first encounter her writing, the year is 1891: “Eleanor was sitting at her writing-table with her pen in her hand. . . . She drew on her blotting paper; a dot with strokes raying out round it. Then she looked up...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2006) 52 (3): 249–274.
Published: 01 September 2006
... the past. Well aware that in many respects the “pain hasn’t started yet,” his recollection of various procedures consistendy re­ veals the prosthetic thinking at work in their management. At one point, for instance, Frederic’s wounded legs must be X-rayed, a process “arranged by holding up the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2016) 62 (2): 197–222.
Published: 01 June 2016
... awareness of Catherine’s negotiation of her dual roles as nurse and romantic interest. Although Catherine possesses medical knowledge and expertise that Frederic does not, she never holds this over him. She patiently teaches him about his x-rays, for instance: “Catherine Barkley showed them to me. They...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2015) 61 (2): 280–286.
Published: 01 June 2015
... tests, scans, x-rays, or biopsies might show, illness exists to the extent that someone lives with it and even assumes it as an identity. Self-perception decouples person and diagnosis; whatever the content of the diagnosis of treatment might be, the person can determine the form and meaning that...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 401–408.
Published: 01 September 2009
... afternoon sun slanted behind her, and to those on board who gazed, her features were charred with shadow, her depths exhausted, her masses ironed to one single plane. Against the luminous sky the rays of her halo were spikes of darkness roweling the air; shadow flattened the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 269–276.
Published: 01 June 2010
... by the Depression. While some authors of this fiction have been restored to view—most famously Zora Neale Hurston—an ar- ray of others such as Margaret Barnes (whose Years of Grace won a Pulitzer Prize), Ann Parrish, Pearl Buck, Josephine Lawrence, Jesse Fauset, Erskine Caldwell, and Ellen...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 277–285.
Published: 01 June 2010
... theories. Beginning with a reading of Nicholas Ray’s Rebel Without a Cause and returning to The Catcher in the Rye, Cheever shows how the American teenager was understood both “as a developmental stage and a cultural type” (18). Adolescence was theorized as a social litmus test, a time of life...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2018) 64 (4): 518–526.
Published: 01 December 2018
... auteurist comics creators who are deeply critical of the superhero genre. While Chute is convincing in her readings of Ware’s Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth (2000) and Clowes’s The Death-Ray (2004) as pointed critiques of the stereotypes that drive the superhero genre and, in turn, the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2006) 52 (3): 352–359.
Published: 01 September 2006
... the argument proceeds is that Coleman is intent on defining who has gotten African American culture (always in the singular) right and who has gotten it wrong. Writers without faithful vision are secularists such as Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, Albert Mur­ ray, the early John Wideman...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2015) 61 (2): 209–231.
Published: 01 June 2015
... literary influence? Let’s not talk about literature” ( Jolas 1928c , 272); a Man Ray photograph titled New York; 1920 showing an unintelligible book page discarded on a New York street; William Closson Emory’s “Love in the West: A Scenario,” a surreal romance between an American man and a “life-sized...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 March 2001
... in which Iriga- ray’s view of hysteria differs from that of Freud is motherhood. Whereas Freud almost completely ignores the role of the mother in hysteria, Iriga- ray proposes that hysterical discourse has a privileged relation to the ma­ ternal body. Perhaps most importantly...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2010) 56 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 March 2010
... palace of Mrs. Phlaccus, at Professor Channing-Cheetah’s” recalls this event, contrasting the passionate exuberance of Russell with the ef- fete mannerisms of the Cambridge gentility, an exuberance expressed in “Russell’s notoriously loud and raucous laughter,” as his biographer Ray Monk describes...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2017) 63 (4): 427–450.
Published: 01 December 2017
...” ( A-Q xix). A number of suggestions have been made about thematic continuities between the Old Dominion poems and “The Pangolin.” Moore’s “armored animal,” for example, “who endures/exhausting solitary/trips through unfamiliar ground” (27), might be a match for her “able/sting-ray-hampered pioneer...