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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2007) 53 (2): 218–223.
Published: 01 June 2007
...Scott McCracken Popular Fiction: The Logics and Practices of a Literary Field , by Gelder Ken , Abingdon : Routledge , 2004 . 179 pages. Copyright © Hofstra University 2007 The Field of Popular Fiction Popular Fiction: The Logics and Practices of a Literary Field by Ken Gelder...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2011) 57 (3-4): 354–363.
Published: 01 December 2011
...Hillary Chute 2011 Hillary Chute The Popularity of Postmodernism Hillary Chute The commonplaces about postmodernism are themselves burdensome commonplaces. They evacuate nuance and historical understanding, and to notice their performance in spheres both popular and academic is...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2016) 62 (2): 170–196.
Published: 01 June 2016
...Jason Vredenburg In both the critical literature and the popular imagination, Jack Kerouac’s seminal road narrative On the Road is often viewed as a celebration of American individualism and frontier myth. Placing the novel within the context of the changing approach to automotive infrastructure...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2013) 59 (3): 504–512.
Published: 01 September 2013
...Matthew Scully The Great American Songbooks: Musical Texts, Modernism, and the Value of Popular Culture , by Graham T. Austin , Oxford University Press , 2013 . 320 pages. © 2015 by Hofstra University 2013 Matthew Scully Musical Literature: Bridging the Gap Between High and Low Art...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2005) 51 (4): 504–511.
Published: 01 December 2005
... quarter-century’s effort to quell the laughter that pained him atVassar—to make himself over as “something of a popular entertainer” and to communicate with a “large and miscellaneous audience.” (127) Chinitz is one of a number of cultural studies scholars who have...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2013) 59 (1): 164–173.
Published: 01 March 2013
...Lara Vetter Women’s Poetry and Popular Culture , by Bryant Marsha , Palgrave Macmillan , 2011 . 235 pages. Copyright © Hofstra University 2013 Lara Vetter Rebranding Women’s Poetry Women’s Poetry and Popular Culture by Marsha Bryant Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. 235 pages Lara...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2008) 54 (3): 396–400.
Published: 01 September 2008
... argument that he has assembled more than a colloquy of illustrious ghosts, and that a particular weave of cultural affinities and affiliations, ultimately knotted into the broader fabric of an American society shaped by the Popular Front of the 1930s and its aftermath, holds these...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2004) 50 (2): v–viii.
Published: 01 June 2004
... ones, assuming the importance of each to the other. It combines the historical record of Eurasians in India (mixed-race people of British and Indian heritage) during the raj with a close reading of a representative popular novel by Maud Diver to question how race and gender work in the context...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2004) 50 (2): 141–166.
Published: 01 June 2004
... served as explanation and excuse for her unconventional behavior. In this, these writers also appropriated a popular interest in gypsy culture that emerged in this period. The decades between 1910 and 1930 were marked by an explosion of writings on gypsies—anthropological studies, popular...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 443–473.
Published: 01 December 2006
..., as Vir­ ginia Woolf put it in her 1926 essay “The Cinema” [272]) is very much in keeping with that o f mass culture in general. In the twenties and thirties, from Kracauer’s “distraction factories” (Mass Ornament 75-76) to Q. D. Leavis’s descriptions of popular reading as masturbatory...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 299–328.
Published: 01 September 2017
... mirrorhand.” Especially popular at the end of the century was Gobolinks, or Shadow Pictures for Young and Old (1896) by Ruth McEnery Stuart and Albert Bigelow Paine. The title’s playful portmanteau unites “ink” with “goblin,” presumably a devilish spirit that haunts the inkbottle. (And, as we will later...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 254–259.
Published: 01 June 2010
... what Trachtenberg (and presumably Niger), mean by “high culture,” since Niger seems to advocate a culture distinct from both enlightenment and popular culture. Thus he posed his defini- tion of culture against the forms of Bildung (education) advocated by the Hebrew-based Haskalah or Jewish...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2004) 50 (4): 433–435.
Published: 01 December 2004
... with “estrangement and death” (30). Although Adams’s discussion of adventure stories is problematic since he relies on the Tarzan stories written by an American, Edgar Rice Burroughs, to demonstrate the prevalence of Hel­ lenism in popular British fiction, his discussion of E. M. Forster’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2013) 59 (3): 494–503.
Published: 01 September 2013
...-cultural genres, from popular nineteenth-century literature (e.g., Jane Tompkins’s Sensational Designs and Michael Denning’s Mechanic Accents) to women’s culture (e.g., Mary Ann Doane’s The Desire to Desire and Lauren Berlant’s The Female Complaint), stands behind and enables Saler’s book, which...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2005) 51 (4): 414–436.
Published: 01 December 2005
... judgments and strong feelings, stemming from the popular discourse sur­ rounding Hughes’s personal life—things that academics are not supposed to be concerned with, though they have become such an inextricable part of Hughes’s cultural legacy that even the most diplomatic explicator of his...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2004) 50 (3): 283–316.
Published: 01 September 2004
... men of the world know” how greed and bloodshed really propel history, not the sanitized, blood­ less innocence of Edwardian popular historians. The desire that both men share to hold the falcon implies a desire to hold the material of history in one’s hands, to touch the barbarically authentic...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 264–271.
Published: 01 June 2011
... troops. In return for compliance, women enjoyed the satisfaction of knowing they were “doing their bit” and the “promise of enhanced social status” (64). Chapter Two, “‘One Hundred Percent’: War Service and Women’s Fiction,” considers female stereotypes in the popular fiction of magazines...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2018) 64 (3): 379–386.
Published: 01 September 2018
... the book is how much more it offers. It also takes in music, advertising, cinema, tricksters, the art market, the mass marketing of reproductions, and, in a surprising but dazzling conclusion, books popularizing cognitive science and books about autism. Taken together, the case these explorations...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2002) 48 (1): 77–99.
Published: 01 March 2002
.... Just as Stevens had faith in Lord Darlington, popular opinion in Brit­ 80 Ishiguro’s The Remains of the Day ain (both on the Left and the Right) initially supported Eden’s actions as Suez unfolded. Eden tried to uphold an anachronistic vision of Brit­ ain’s imperial mission that, more...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2006) 52 (3): 360–365.
Published: 01 September 2006
... reputation partly as an Agrarian legacy; Cleanth Brooks’s early groundbreaking work on Faulkner is jusdy celebrated here. However, Faulkner’s continued popularity and relevance to newer critical models and contexts makes Winchell’s temporally limited horizons seem more archaic and ideologically...