1-20 of 306 Search Results for

poet

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2003) 49 (2): 193–218.
Published: 01 June 2003
...Shannon McRae Copyright © Hofstra University 2003 Glowed into Words ’ ’: Vivien Eliot, Philomela, and the Poet’s Tortured Corpse Shannon M cRae ./Vfter he finished the poem that irrevocably transformed twentieth- century poetry, T. S. Eliot set about rewriting himself...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2005) 51 (2): 244–248.
Published: 01 June 2005
...Stephen Cushman How Poets See the World: The Art o f Description in Contemporary Poetry , by Spiegelman Willard , New York : Oxford University Press , 2005 . 238 pages. Copyright © Hofstra University 2005 w Reviews Poets of Every Description How Poets See the World: The...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 277–284.
Published: 01 June 2011
...Nick Halpern Elizabeth Bishop’s Poetics of Description , by Pickard Zachariah , McGill-Queen’s University Press , 2009 . 212 pages. A Poet’s High Argument: Elizabeth Bishop and Christianity , by Corelle Laurel Snow , University of South Carolina Press , 2008 . 139 pages...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2019) 65 (1-2): 121–144.
Published: 01 March 2019
... on in the Russian American immigrant literature that has sprung up since the turn of the millennium. The city even has its own New World simulacrum in New York’s “Little Odessa” neighborhood. This article investigates the impact of the “Odessa Text” on the work of two Odessa-born US authors, the poet...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2017) 63 (4): 405–426.
Published: 01 December 2017
...Christina Pugh By looking closely at Marianne Moore’s revisions of her early poem “Half Deity,” this essay shows Moore’s journey to the lyric speech that was the hallmark of both her later poetry and the poetry readings for which she became famous as an older poet. In contrast to recent readings of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2018) 64 (2): 191–222.
Published: 01 June 2018
... further develop her politics of description; poems such as “Florida” (1939) and “Brazil, January 1, 1502” (1959) invoke an indigenous American subject whose calls of distress are an ambivalent figure for the poet’s voice and vocation. Through their attempts to construct or attend to that voice, these...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2016) 62 (1): 56–74.
Published: 01 March 2016
...Paul Bradley Bellew American modernist Hart Crane’s poem “The Idiot” details the poet’s real-life encounters with a young man with a cognitive disability. Beginning in 1926, Crane worked on the poem through different versions through letters, manuscripts, and magazine publications until about 1932...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2016) 62 (1): 75–95.
Published: 01 March 2016
.... Specifically, the most characteristic poetic landscape in Eliot’s early poems (the urban cityscape) develops within a tradition dominated by Walt Whitman, the most significant American urban poet prior to Eliot. Rejecting the notion that Eliot was a disconnected and detached cultural observer so immersed in...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2017) 63 (4): 451–474.
Published: 01 December 2017
... Harbor into a document thick with questions, jotted afterthoughts, and a longing for political intervention. The essay’s broader purpose is to consider Moore’s revisionary habits as a species of vocal improvisation and so to offer a new angle on her emerging responsibilities as a war poet. Copyright...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 94–101.
Published: 01 March 2017
... fifty years in the making. The trilogy—composed of The Tenth Muse: The Psyche of the American Poet (1975), A Coherent Splendor: The American Poetic Renaissance, 1910–1950 (1987), and this present book, American Poetry after Modernism: The Power of the Word (2015)—is a rare scholarly enterprise. It...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2006) 52 (2): 241–247.
Published: 01 June 2006
... definition are a number of assump­ tions that have been tested and contested by the six American poets this study brings together: three moderns—Frost, Stevens, and Marianne Moore—and three contemporary poets who are their intellectual heirs and successors: Amy Clampitt,A. R. Ammons, and John...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2002) 48 (2): v–vii.
Published: 01 June 2002
... author, though its intertextual explorations of Bishop’s relations to Wordsworth, Frost, Lowell, and Randall Jarrell give it a broad take on modern poetic traditions and the problem of the modern poetic career: how can poets, especially women poets, conceive this calling. If lyric...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 393–400.
Published: 01 September 2009
... Jon Stallworthy Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008. 226 pages Guy Cuthbertson War and the literature of war have long been at the heart of Jon Stallwor- thy’s writing. He recalls: “perhaps because I began writing poems (at the age of seven) in wartime, I associated poets with war...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2005) 51 (2): 259–262.
Published: 01 June 2005
... introduction, however, his book is as much about poets’ casting off monumental pretensions as it is about their casting about or fishing for ways to commemorate and con­ nect with the past in a credible way. Rotella begins by noting a prevailing, even defining, impulse of mo­ dernity by quoting...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2012) 58 (1): 141–149.
Published: 01 March 2012
... Clune Does a poet’s belief about the world, expressed in a poem, have any special claim on us? Adorno thought not. He labeled such beliefs “opinions” and segregated them from that dimension of poetry that does have a strong claim to truth: form (228). Adorno represents poetic artifacts the way...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 107–114.
Published: 01 March 2017
..., British, and Irish poets and poetry across the Iron Curtain between 1948 and 1989. As Quinn stresses, the unassuming preposition across is key to his approach. Studies that remain on either side of the Cold War’s principal geopolitical divide, or within a single nation or language, afford only “an...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2004) 50 (4): 436–439.
Published: 01 December 2004
... Response to Chinese Art by Zhaoming Qian Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2003. 274 pages Feng Lan It was a common belief among classical Chinese poets that poetry and painting shared the same source of creativity (shi hua tong yuan), one that enabled them to transcend the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2005) 51 (1): 105–109.
Published: 01 March 2005
... important task for many. Impressive careers were developed by those who defended these postwar outsider poets, from Sherman Paul’s innova­ tive “journal-entry” type meditations from the 1970s, which addressed Charles Olson, Robert Creeley, David Antin, and others, to Maijorie Perloff’s how-to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2016) 62 (1): 110–117.
Published: 01 March 2016
... Fireside Poets, for example) and eliding others entirely (the poetic traditions of minority or immigrant groups; children’s poetry; light verse). The Cambridge History does neither. The result is a physically imposing 50-chapter book, consisting of more than 1300 densely packed pages and weighing almost...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2014) 60 (3): 405–413.
Published: 01 September 2014
..., and how does it cross and transcend national—and hemispheric—bor- ders? This book showed how (seemingly) effortlessly Anglo-American modernists could be brought into conversation with postmodern and postcolonial poets from around the world. Now, in Poetry and Its Others, Ramazani continues this...