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pater

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2016) 62 (3): 345–349.
Published: 01 September 2016
... she evaluates Walter Pater, a nineteenth-century philosopher and art historian. Walter explains that one of Pater’s most famous art history texts, The Renaissance (1873), “play[s] on the inseparability of word and image”; for her, Pater’s conception of imagetext is of an opaque and fragmented...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2006) 52 (2): 111–144.
Published: 01 June 2006
... reside. Perhaps more significantly, the expression “circle of our thought” also points back to Walter Pater’s Studies in the History of the Renaissance (1873).15 Carol Christ has compellingly argued that Pater formulated the problem of epistemological isolation not only for Tennyson and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2003) 49 (3): 328–359.
Published: 01 September 2003
... habit articulated by influential writers like Ralph Waldo Emerson, James’s pragmatist progenitor, and Walter Pater, one of literary modernism’s key precursors. Stein, in one sense, inherits James’s positivism (he sees habit as a means toward self-improvement), and yet she does not...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2002) 48 (1): 1–21.
Published: 01 March 2002
... disliked the romantic aesthetic, and yet not only did his poetry suggest that he was, as Richard Aldington commented in 1915, “the last of the Romantics,” but also the majority of his poetic theory was derived from artists like Whistler and Pater (Pound, “Vortex”; Gib­ son). Similarly, he...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2009) 55 (2): 232–254.
Published: 01 June 2009
... usually positioned in relation to the theorists he cites: Goethe, Lessing, Aristotle, Aquinas, Walter Pater, and Oscar Wilde.10 Yet his closing comments to Lynch about “the beautiful” more closely resemble the theories of Vernon Lee, a central figure in psychological aesthetics. Born in Britain...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2008) 54 (3): 401–409.
Published: 01 September 2008
... imposed by a gendered economy of sex-role stereotypes. 402 Review In 1897 the 15-year-old Virginia Stephen began studying Greek with Dr. George Warr at King’s college, then continued her classical training under the tutelage of Clara Pater and Janet Case. Woolf’s educational en­ counter...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2013) 59 (3): 504–512.
Published: 01 September 2013
... in comparison to the high arts, a question of value that is at stake throughout Graham’s study. Graham’s opening chapter, “Musical Literature, its Theory and Practice,” provides the text’s most extensive theoretical, historical, and methodological overview. Beginning with Walter Pater’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2011) 57 (3-4): 492–515.
Published: 01 December 2011
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2015) 61 (1): 32–62.
Published: 01 March 2015
... of Shaw, Galsworthy, Mrs. Wharton, Du Bois or Conrad, or that old master of exquisite phrase and imaginative incident—Walter Pater?” (1987, 209) When readers detected Wharton’s influence on Fauset, her publisher wholly embraced the comparison: In 1924,…Liverright advertisements boasted about “a new...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2001) 47 (3): 325–354.
Published: 01 September 2001
... 47). While this is indeed the col­ or of one kind of passion in H.D.’s work, it is certainly not the color of passion in Nights, where the desire for the geometric body is blue, silver, white. Eileen Gregory argues that, given the way that H.D. draws on Walter Pater’s use of this...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2002) 48 (2): 150–173.
Published: 01 June 2002
... influence.) Friar writes that we should remember that the Medusa was once beautiful and may still be to the “inner vision” (324).9 For Friar, the Medusa is a 156 James Merrill’s Early Poetry dangerous muselike figure, like Keats’s la belle dame or Walter Pater’s Mona Lisa or Eliot’s Lady of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2017) 63 (2): 228–236.
Published: 01 June 2017
... a more gender-oriented reading here that would still focus on decadence. The study’s chronological limits would also have made possible some consideration of Virginia Woolf’s connections to decadence. She has often been linked to Walter Pater. It would not have stretched the limits significantly to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2004) 50 (3): 239–267.
Published: 01 September 2004
... persistent desire “never to break faith with the pure, gemlike feelings of adolescence lest [he] turn, like Dorian Gray, into a hideous and corrupt thirty-year-old” (183). His fear of corruption and his changing Pater’s “hard” flame to a “pure” one suggest that what he idealized in those...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2009) 55 (2): 279–285.
Published: 01 June 2009
... children, and his conversion to the rootedness and longevity of Catholicism—all converging in his jocular and witty but no less defiant resistance to his secular foes (Pater, Nietzsche, Wilde, Shaw, Kipling, Wells, Tolstoy). In his essay “Is Humanism a Religion?” he writes: “I distrust spiritual...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 720–727.
Published: 01 December 2012
... James, and Habit in the Shadow of War.” In part because Stein studied with James at Radcliffe, the chapter commences with a discussion of William James’s ideas about habits, a discussion that quickly involves Olson in a comparison of James’s ideas with those of Walter Pater and Henri Bergson...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2014) 60 (1): 111–118.
Published: 01 March 2014
... everything else, poetry is words; and that words, above everything else, are, in poetry, sounds” (663). It is not a question of Valéry’s supplanting figures like Emerson (who equally lies behind Stevens’s phrase “skeptical music” and his poem “The Red Fern or Coleridge, or even Pater, but of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 78–99.
Published: 01 March 2000
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2008) 54 (1): 115–127.
Published: 01 March 2008
... Pater into a dangerous fixation on form. From Joyce’s “Circe” to Roger Fry’s and Clive Bell’s “significant form” to Eliot’s Four Quartets, the dominant mode of modernism aspires to the condition of music. Alternatively, classical modernism “approaches the condition of sculpture, the art of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 299–328.
Published: 01 September 2017
..., one sometimes traced back to Walter Pater’s well-loved description of Mona Lisa (1873) and forward to W. H. Auden’s “Musée des Beaux Arts” (1939) and “The Shield of Achilles” (1952). 7 By definition, though, ekphrasis presupposes representation, whereas the inkblot at least pretends at abstraction...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2007) 53 (2): 182–211.
Published: 01 June 2007
... sense of the aesthetic as an autonomous sphere of cultural value remains an essential legacy of postromantic art and receives some of its most notable, if variously inflected, expressions in the writ­ ings of Arnold, Ruskin, and Pater—all of whom were figures in Cather’s reading.8 Her...