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painting

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2006) 52 (2): vi–vii.
Published: 01 June 2006
... seemed to me the most fully and rigorously elaborated may well appear, paradoxically, to be the most modest—in its topic, scope, and procedures. “Parrot’s Eye: A Portrait by Manet and Two byT. S. Eliot” focuses, as the title suggests, on one painting and two poems. A study in what used to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2014) 60 (4): 423–454.
Published: 01 December 2014
... suddenly and unexpectedly late at night, . . . and said he had left a Cézanne by the roadside! Duncan rushed off to get it and you can imagine how exciting it all was” (212-13). The excitement over the painting in the hedge still reverberated years later, and the event lent its title to a...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2006) 52 (2): 111–144.
Published: 01 June 2006
...Frances Dickey Copyright © Hofstra University 2006 HI Parrot’s Eye: A Portrait by Manet and Two by T. S. Eliot Frances Dickey T. S. Eliot’s little-known sonnet “On a Portrait” (1909) describes a painting by Edouard Manet from 1866, Woman with a Parrot. The sig­ nificance of this...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2009) 55 (1): 137–144.
Published: 01 March 2009
..., particularly the art they produce with their bodies” (11). Edith Wharton and the Visual Arts employs its ground­ breaking investigation of Wharton’s engagement with Pre-Raphaelite paintings and poetry to highlight what it convincingly argues is Wharton’s “realist revision of the sexual politics of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 78–99.
Published: 01 March 2000
... ticity” (Fry, “Some Questions” 5) to verbal impressionism in composing the novel. Woolf observes that the “arts of painting and writing lay close together and Roger Fry was always making raids across the boundaries” (Roger Fry 208). She herself made raids on postimpressionist painting in the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2018) 64 (2): 247–258.
Published: 01 June 2018
... oil painting by French artist Jean-Léon Gérôme. 1 Entitled The Snake Charmer , this striking work, which dates from around 1879–1880, has become almost synonymous with Said’s revered inquiry into “the way cultural dominance . . . operated” when Western culture turned its attention—as it did so...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2004) 50 (4): 436–439.
Published: 01 December 2004
... Chinese Art by Zhaoming Qian Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2003. 274 pages Feng Lan It was a common belief among classical Chinese poets that poetry and painting shared the same source of creativity (shi hua tong yuan), one that enabled them to transcend the mundane...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2008) 54 (4): 448–471.
Published: 01 December 2008
... today though. (Self-Portrait 50) Ashbery here borrows from Bishop the phrase she writes when, recogniz­ ing the Nova Scotia town of her childhood in a “little painting” by her great-uncle, she is startled by the strangeness that their “visions coincided” (CP 176). But, she reflects, “‘visions’ is...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 709–719.
Published: 01 December 2012
..., 2010. 239 pages Phoebe Putnam In January of last year, New Yorker critic Peter Schjeldahl took aim at enfant terrible Damien Hirst’s candy-colored spot paintings (currently be- ing shown in aggregate as “The Complete Spot Paintings, 1986-2011” in New York, London, Paris, Geneva, Rome, Athens...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2013) 59 (4): 657–665.
Published: 01 December 2013
.... Putting his best lines, as he usually did, in the mouth of one of his characters (personae), Wilde’s Basil Hallward (portraitist) declares that: Every portrait that is painted with feeling is a portrait of the artist, not of the sitter. The sitter is merely the accident, the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 569–595.
Published: 01 December 2001
... stems from the spice trade, the Moor is expected to fulfill familial, social, and aesthetic goals: to extend the family name and wealth into the next generation, to em­ body Indian pluralism in his own right and in his mother’s paintings (he models for her), and to capture the reader’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2005) 51 (4): 437–466.
Published: 01 December 2005
... existence in the present. Sasha’s changing relationship to the painting she buys from the Jewish painter Serge Rubin—in perhaps the happiest scene in the novel—demonstrates her repeated slide into the timelessness of trauma. The painting is of “an old Jew with a red nose, playing the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2008) 54 (2): 255–262.
Published: 01 June 2008
... Lewis, Gaudier, and Alvin Langdon Coburn), “booming” them in his reviews (as in the art criticism he wrote for the New Age from 1917 to 1920), debating with them, and of course frequendy infuriating them. The impact of vorticism, along with futurist painting, cubism, and collage on the “open...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2006) 52 (2): 241–247.
Published: 01 June 2006
...-year-old critical consensus “that landscape is an exhausted, even insidious genre” of both poetry and painting (11).That consensus is widely shared, she finds, not only among critics seeking to discredit the “imperialist aesthetic” of Western art, from Annette Kolodny and Myra Jehlen to the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 640–644.
Published: 01 December 2009
.... Prodger offers charts of numbers of illustrations in his work, points to Darwin’s early and wide-ranging interest in paint- ing and the fine arts, his son’s dabbling in photography, his family’s role in the invention of photography (his uncle Thomas Wedgwood was an early experimenter), and even...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 462–492.
Published: 01 December 2010
... genre of the novel.  This connection, in turn, illuminates the thematic and formal significance of the language of advertising in several of Naipaul’s novels. Guerillas (1975) opens with a slew of ads, from “the side wall of a concrete house . . . painted over with an advertisement” (3) to the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2007) 53 (4): 518–529.
Published: 01 December 2007
... for a time when an ex­ hibition of surrealist paintings or the mere sight of a urinal mounted on a pedestal might inspire heartfelt revulsion or incomprehension. Anyone who has spent a weekend in New York City strolling from one gallery to another in the Chelsea art district will attest to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2002) 48 (4): 461–486.
Published: 01 December 2002
... philosophical essay concerning the limits of painting and poetry, which is directly referred to in Stephen’s discussion with Donovan and Cranly about aesthetics in A Portrait of the Artist as Young Man. In Joyce’s first novel, published initially as a serial in Marsden’s and Weaver’s journal the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2001) 47 (2): 268–292.
Published: 01 June 2001
... as a distinct “aura of difference.” The response of painter Paul Cadmus to Forster’s novels clearly ex­ emplifies the effect of Forster’s reconfigured gaze on a gay reader and fellow artist. In his painting entitled To E. M. Forster, Cadmus depicts a fully clothed...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 285–290.
Published: 01 June 2011
... into an economically constructed visual narrative. In doing so, Griffith manages to accelerate Norris’s narrative in a manner more commensurate with the modern speed of information flow. According to the film critic Andre Bazin, the rise of photography eventually led painting to abandon its...