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pain

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2017) 63 (2): 167–190.
Published: 01 June 2017
... not a language intelligible only to me” (261). The private word simply substitutes for, and therefore relies on, the speaker’s knowledge of a shared term. We learn to use a word like “pain,” then, by speaking with others and familiarizing ourselves with the standard contexts in which people employ...
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Published: 01 September 2017
Figure 2 Stuart and Paine. Gobolinks (1896). Front cover. Figure 2. Stuart and Paine. Gobolinks (1896). Front cover. More
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Published: 01 September 2017
Figure 3 Stuart and Paine. Gobolinks (1896). Back cover. Figure 3. Stuart and Paine. Gobolinks (1896). Back cover. More
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2018) 64 (4): 449–482.
Published: 01 December 2018
... anthropological, heritage—when she represents characters’ undeserved, uncompensated pains. Woolf’s thinking aligns her with Charles Darwin in the natural sciences. Like Darwin, Woolf makes tragic chance inseparable from the theater of life. This essay reads Woolf’s oft-cited rejection of teleological form and her...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2018) 64 (4): 483–503.
Published: 01 December 2018
... difficulties of witnessing. Yet, as opposed to merely marking the limits of what can be witnessed, disgust offers an alternative, affective way of encountering the pain of others that still challenges the more soothing logic of mourning and meaning-making. It has a particular countermemorial capacity to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 196–220.
Published: 01 June 2010
... pains in her left breast and abdomen are indecipherable presentiments of the Nazi jackboot that cracks into her breast and pelvis as she lies in the ravine in the massacre and of the bayonet that is thrust 196Twentieth-Century Literature 56.2 Summer 2010 196 Sublime Anamnesis...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2016) 62 (4): 429–447.
Published: 01 December 2016
... still tell. While the shell-shocked soldiers in Regeneration have been fighting in the service of empire, they are nonetheless perceived as internal opponents of the state and, thus, like the dissident Algerians in Children of the New World , suffer pain at the hands of a colonial power. In both...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 March 2001
... ploying French feminist ideas about hysteria, I will argue that Beloved explores the means by which the disempowered and dispossessed ex­ press personal dissatisfaction and enact political dissent. By examining the relationship between the repression of pain and the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 485–509.
Published: 01 December 2009
... included a sequel describing Eliza’s life after she left Higgins’s labora- tory.1 To the two painful transformations depicted in the play, he now added a third. After reading the novels of H. G. Wells, Freddy’s snobby sister Clara undergoes changes almost as drastic as Eliza’s or her father’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2006) 52 (3): 249–274.
Published: 01 September 2006
... troubled recollections find expression in apparendy em- Twentieth-Century Literature 52.3 Fall 2006 249 Trevor Dodman bodied and disembodied ways: as pain that registers at the level of the body, breaking apart the perceived unity of the physical self in the pres­ ence of terrific bodily...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2005) 51 (4): 437–466.
Published: 01 December 2005
... ear narration, often presented through interior monologues, novels such as Voyage in the Dark and Good Morning, Midnight exemplify modernist fragmentation while intimating a deeper sense of pain and loss than most accounts of such fragmentation acknowledge. In spite of the strong under­ tone...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 396–404.
Published: 01 December 2000
... suggestion of a hog, a swinish taint” and—here the narrator Prendrick quotes directly from Revelation—“the unmistakable mark of the beast” (99). Moreau’s work, like Rubek’s art, causes pain to other creatures, but to him, as to Rubek until the very end of his life, this pain to others is the price...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2000) 46 (2): 193–213.
Published: 01 June 2000
..., the center of the novel. Yet, in the spaces that separate Jim and Antonia, we find a shock­ ing variety of memories that recount disturbing, radical violence, stories of “violent deaths and casual buryings” that give Jim “a painful and peculiar pleasure” (72, 41).5 His memories of Antonia, and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2007) 53 (1): 1–22.
Published: 01 March 2007
... fixed, ig­ nited eyes” (104), and it is “too pretty” when “the paper chambers flush and fill with light / that comes and goes, like hearts” (103). Beautiful things can cause pain, and “The Armadillo” is itself “too pretty, dream­ like mimicry” despite the moral of its final...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2009) 55 (1): 58–79.
Published: 01 March 2009
... 61 Graham Fraser by-products of the “brief movements of the lower face,” Pirn’s song is the simple result of stimulating or smothering the body which produces it. Through violence and pain, Beckett depicts the origins of Pirn’s expres­ sion as brutally limited to the reactions of his tormented...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2016) 62 (2): 197–222.
Published: 01 June 2016
... manner is not her natural demeanor but a product of her wartime experience. Infrequently, Catherine does speak to Frederic about her psychological pain—“I haven’t been happy for a long time and when I met you perhaps I was nearly crazy. Perhaps I was crazy” ( FTA 101). For less explicit clues, we must...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2007) 53 (4): 535–539.
Published: 01 December 2007
... transfiguration—in the split-second lapse between his bodily death and its forecast on his watch screen. But the text clearly states that Packer’s “pain interfere[s] with his immortality” (Cosmopolis 207), and that he comes “to know himself, untranslatable through his pain”: in short, Packer achieves only...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 694–701.
Published: 01 December 2012
... statement or argument about women’s move- ments or a declaration against childbirth. Rather it is part of Duncan’s description of the dire and endless pain she suffered in the process of giving birth and her belief that the pain of childbirth was “useless agony” which should be alleviated with...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2004) 50 (3): 207–238.
Published: 01 September 2004
... is painful proof of a uniqueness that language strains to express. Through their wordplay, dying becomes gambling—a bet that we all lose— and singularity (the ace, or single spot on the die) is proclaimed only as it is nullified. Compare this bombastic display of mortal...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2000) 46 (3): 369–386.
Published: 01 September 2000
... sense memory. In recalling and narrating sense memories in these episodes, the narrator reexperiences in flesh the terror of those months. When these memories become too painful, the narrator must then take refuge in intellectual memory, a narrativizing memory that cleanses sense memories of...