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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 482–488.
Published: 01 December 2006
... the publication of his first book, Goodbye, Columbus, in 1959. R oth has drawn many outstanding critics from Herm- ione Lee to Philip R oth himself, but the challenge that confronts the ambitious R oth critic is to identify a critical approach that does justice to the many...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 298–326.
Published: 01 September 2007
.... In the first mode, R oth describes himself as an ambitious young man who, determined to “manu­ facture a future” (“something more humanely exciting than a De Soto hardtop or a Westinghouse washer-dryer” [278 discovers instead “just how little one has to do w ith calling the shots...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 406–413.
Published: 01 September 2007
..., represented in the novel’s plague, points to a “startling lack o f agency for individuals caught up in history” (62). Franco likens Morales to R oth and Ozick as they draw heavily from trau­ 407 Delia C. Konzett matic histories o f the past to construe tenuous identities o f the present...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 233–247.
Published: 01 September 2007
... 1980s was visible not only in syllabuses and academic jour­ 235 Andrew Hoberek nals but also, for instance, in the postm odern turn taken by a decidedly nonacademic author like Philip R oth. Even at its high point, however, postmodernism— and in particular the form o f...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 401–408.
Published: 01 September 2009
..., focusing on Marx, Hemingway, Henry Roth, and oth- ers, investigate how some ethnic writers drew on modernist form and Hemingway’s hard-boiled masculinity to represent and rewrite discourses of American community; and chapters 14–17 turn to international poli- tics, totalitarianism, and the concept of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 702–708.
Published: 01 December 2012
... approaches, among oth- ers—as follows: “My theoretical eclecticism is a tactical choice that is based on the premise that previous scholarship on specific literary authors has been hindered by the attempt to see literature through the prism of one particular critical approach” (20). In approaching the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2007) 53 (1): 67–73.
Published: 01 March 2007
... narratives. And to the degree that English is, for them, something always requiring at least a second thought, it is never quite the exclusive topic of W irth-Nesher’s book. In that sense, the imperative of her tide, which she borrows from Henry R oth’s 1934 novel Call It Sleep...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 530–544.
Published: 01 December 2010
... white mainstream. Contrasting himsef with Camilla, he claims “I could feel the whiteness of my face” (117). And ultimately this whiteness allows him to blend in with the oth- ers: “I looked at the faces around me,” he says, “and I knew mine was like theirs . . . tight faces, worried, lost...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2002) 48 (3): 348–361.
Published: 01 September 2002
...: 349 Craig Smith The early Christian (and Aristotelian) view that animals were created purely for the benefit o f mankind, and the Cartesian idea that they were incapable o f suffering, were mutually compatible variations on the same theme. B oth provided human beings...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2005) 51 (4): 437–466.
Published: 01 December 2005
... talks René into leaving her room that it’s “[n]othing to do with me—I swear it” (183). But her metaphor of the film is nevertheless apt, since Sasha is indeed projecting her fantasy outward, imagining it on a movie screen rather than recognizing its presence in her own mind. In this passage...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 357–377.
Published: 01 September 2009
... response, he tries to undermine the concept of national identity both in the way he lives his life and by managing the ways oth- ers see and classify him. By posing as British and American, Ray in effect 371 Bridget T. Chalk stages his own process of categorization, mimicking the function of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 221–244.
Published: 01 June 2010
... boundless capacity to demonize oth- ers as a strategy for defusing substantive demands and rendering potential dissenters quiescent, the left has also found the apocalyptic register useful at times of great oppression, for both strains of discourse enable the urgent description of intolerable...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 260–282.
Published: 01 June 2013
... Breaking of the Day (Peter Davison, 1964) and Firstborn (Louise Glück, 1968). By elaborating in Some Trees such themes as youth, precocity, and aspiration, among oth- ers, Ashbery presents a conventional career narrative that projects a regular course of progress, and yet he also emphasizes the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 470–491.
Published: 01 December 2000
... inevitably leads him to the problem of the particular posing as the universal, while the rhetoric of community, the pressures of having to tran­ scend place and time, literally leaves him abstracted and disembodied. THE POSTAPOCALYPSE AND THE UNVEILING OF A NATION oth the umma and the modern nation...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2009) 55 (2): 175–208.
Published: 01 June 2009
... several attempts to grasp the “hidden self” (168) of Flaubert and to fulfill “the purpose of biography, but in a different way” (171; Bell’s italics). While Bell’s reading inverts the readings of Winsworth, Cox, and oth- ers, it too sacrifices the crucial ambiguity in the art/life, male...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2012) 58 (1): 60–89.
Published: 01 March 2012
... charged “hidden riches” in the display windows: In some, waves of silk and ribbon broke over shores of imitation moss from which ravishing hats rose like tropical orchids. In oth- ers the pink throats of gramophones opened their giant convo- lutions . . . and in one vast bay...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2001) 47 (2): 241–267.
Published: 01 June 2001
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2005) 51 (2): 210–243.
Published: 01 June 2005
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 273–297.
Published: 01 September 2007
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 299–328.
Published: 01 September 2017
... process in crucially material terms: Remember write Greek ees. Bloom dipped, Bloo mur: dear sir. Dear Henry wrote: dear Mady. Got your lett and flow. Hell did I put? Some pock or oth. It is utterl imposs. Underline imposs. To write today. [. . .] Bloom mur: best references. But Henry wrote: it will...