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optical

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2016) 62 (3): 345–349.
Published: 01 September 2016
...Megan Poole Optical Impersonality: Science, Images, and Literary Modernism , by Walter Christina . Johns Hopkins University Press , 2014 . 352 pages. Copyright © Hofstra University 2016 Fashioning a foundational book within contemporary modernist studies is a rare occurrence...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2011) 57 (1): 114–122.
Published: 01 March 2011
... Canada (Chapter One), the critical geographies of fugitive slave narratives written in Mexico as well as the US and Canada (Chapter Two), the perspectives on mainstream “American” literary movements such as modernism and the Beats made possible by a transnational or non-US-based optic (Chapters...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): 137–168.
Published: 01 June 2014
... whose flickering ephemerality emblematizes the larger problematic of knowing and instrumentalizing the past. Optical miniatures Despite the standard poststructuralist privileging of the particular over the general waged through a theoretical critique of totalizing metanarratives, the detail...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 78–99.
Published: 01 March 2000
...). Optically, blue opens a space for perception and meditation;7 as a substantive, the word blue conveys a substance (atmosphere or pigment) as well as inviting an imaginative response. Johannes Itten describes the optical and spiritual vibrations of blue: As red is always active, so blue is...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 349–354.
Published: 01 June 2012
... the mundane “eat” into “assimilate some fodder” (65), and he asks Bill Smith not if Ruth Bradfield is good-looking but “Does she aid or mar an optic?” (268). As the creator of new words and phrases, it seems appropriate that the young Hemingway assume various names and guises: he refers to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2015) 61 (2): 264–271.
Published: 01 June 2015
... comparativist reading practice in its first half before turning to a series of case studies in its second. Berman’s “transnational optic” also reads canonical figures such as James Joyce alongside Mulk Raj Anand to suggest new constellations attuned to anticolonial specificity (28). By beginning with a...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2016) 62 (4): 463–470.
Published: 01 December 2016
... released a few titles as ebooks, and there are several of her works, such as The Journal of Mary Hervey Russell (1945) that exist in optical character recognition (OCR) reproductions of varying quality. But until more of her important novels return in editions and quantities suitable for student use, a...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 115–124.
Published: 01 March 2000
... Meaning of Pound’s China.” 45.4 (1999): 511-33 118 INDEX Heaney, Seamus. See Booth Hemingway, Ernest. See Berman; Eby; Gaillard; Lamb; Willis Hite, Molly. “Optics and Autobiography in Margaret Atwood’s Cat’s Eye.” 41.2 (1995): 135-59...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 401–408.
Published: 01 September 2009
... and a much wider optic, employing numerous tangents and unusual juxtapositions to generate provocative questions about the aesthetic and cultural attributes too often presupposed of modernist experimentation. Sollors considers, for example, the relationship between realist immigrant narratives...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2016) 62 (4): 379–402.
Published: 01 December 2016
... avant-garde and mainstream), modernist little magazines and the print public sphere, biology, ecology, and optical science. This resituation of H.D.’s work within history has found a particularly productive context in recent considerations of the importance of space and place to her artistic practices...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 34–55.
Published: 01 March 2000
... colonialism, so that “mimicry represents an ironic compromise” between “the synchronic pan- optical vision of domination—the demand for identity, stasis—and the counter pressure of the diachrony of history—change, difference” (86). Concealed within Richard Dalloway’s glib rhetoric of “dominion” and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 100–114.
Published: 01 March 2000
... chapter 30, Berlin had been fiddling with the optics on the night-vision goggles but now is playing a time-guessing game. Vision and time unify all the reflec­ tions of the observation post. Now Paul reflects: “It was a matter of hard observation separating illusion from reality. What happened, and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2011) 57 (3-4): 291–308.
Published: 01 December 2011
... form is, in a way, returning to postmodernism, but a postmodernism that looks quite different than the version ultimately dominant in English Departments in the 1990s. At the same time, in the optic introduced by the recent work we have been discussing in this essay, it could also be claimed...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 49–74.
Published: 01 March 2017
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 168–195.
Published: 01 June 2010
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2010) 56 (3): 287–317.
Published: 01 September 2010
.... Walter Benjamin describes the way photographic technologies such as “time lapses [and] enlargements” (512) transformed the “optical un- conscious” by 298 Playing the Historical Record: DeLillo’s Libra and the Kennedy Archive reveal[ing] in this material physiognomic aspects, image...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 327–344.
Published: 01 September 2007
... world of fibre-optic pulses and media saturation, a world where “ [t]he point o f repetition is there is no point” (118).The excess o f adjectives and pop-culture neolo­ gisms in Wallace’s quirky prose— “disgusting marshmallowy Rice Krispie things” (594)— testifies to a landscape where objects...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2005) 51 (3): 316–340.
Published: 01 September 2005
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2006) 52 (1): 22–41.
Published: 01 March 2006
... “white.” As a mulatta, Helga is hung on this “cross”: she is too optically black to pass for white and therefore cannot escape the black/shack or black/worker equations. Crucially, at the root of Helga s ambivalence about her black identity is a social system predicated on multilevel class...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2011) 57 (3-4): 516–538.
Published: 01 December 2011
.... Instead, we witness Doug Fanning’s almost total identification with the processes of the market: his churning mind turned lucid and through it power flowed as frictionless as money down a fiber-optic line, the resistance of the physical world reduced to the vanishing point. He felt...