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nuclear war

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2016) 62 (2): 145–169.
Published: 01 June 2016
... as a Boeing technical writer, and Century 21 goes unmentioned in work on the novel’s allusions by Steven Weisenburger and others. Pynchon responds throughout Gravity’s Rainbow to Century 21, particularly its Cold War views of space-age futurism and nuclear weapons. I draw new connections between the angel...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2012) 58 (3): 540–545.
Published: 01 September 2012
... DeLillo, Richard Powers—Grausam makes the case that the “radical experimentation of American postmodern fic- tion is an effect of, and increasingly, an attempt to understand, life lived under the threat of total nuclear war” (4). I will resist the temptation to describe Grausam’s claims...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2013) 59 (2): 377–384.
Published: 01 June 2013
... an ongoing struggle. And while it is fair to doubt that many people long for the time of imminent nuclear threats, something interesting has happened with the Cold War: it has become an academic topic that it is possible to discuss without primary reference to the ideological or political positions...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2000) 46 (4): 387–395.
Published: 01 December 2000
... be revealed. All subsequent, post- apocalyptic destruction would be absolutely without meaning, mere repeti­ tion. We can point to four principle areas of postwar apocalyptic representa­ tion. The first is nuclear war, the second is the Holocaust, the third is the apocalypses of liberation...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2022) 68 (2): 225–234.
Published: 01 June 2022
... of things—a horrific act that would perpetuate a culture that has created her deformity in the first place. Merril’s 1950 novel Shadow on the Hearth depicts a conventional wife and mother trying to protect her family in the aftermath of a nuclear war; like the short story already discussed, it suggests...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2000) 46 (4): 405–433.
Published: 01 December 2000
... apocalyptic visions that have proliferated wildly in the last I200 years, the world has been destroyed by nuclear wars, alien invasions, climatic changes, social upheavals, meteor strikes, and technological shut­ downs. These baroque scenarios are shaped by the eroticism of disaster. The apocalyptic...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2009) 55 (4): 572–596.
Published: 01 December 2009
.... Marovitz actually seems a bit surprised to discover how little attention Huxley ultimately paid the prospect of nuclear war, “[g]iven his concern and fears over nuclear armament as he expressed them in the late 1940s” (121–22). Huxley was more vexed by the ethicopolitical stakes—“the war-making mania...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2000) 46 (4): 434–452.
Published: 01 December 2000
... victim. 6 I want to underscore that I am not trying to engage in a high- vs. low- culture argument here. In many ways, science-fiction publications became the center for resisting and undermining official military narratives about nuclear war during the post-World War II years...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2016) 62 (4): 448–454.
Published: 01 December 2016
... of catastrophe reorients contemporary theories of potentiality. Taking Jacques Derrida’s assertion that mourning and literary archives must be thought in relation to the nuclear condition, and applying this insight to the massive paradigm shift that occurs when war moves its theater from the ground to the air...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2018) 64 (1): 120–127.
Published: 01 March 2018
... for their reconsideration. Most prominent is the postwar as a historical period (effectively 1945–89), defined by the political aesthetics of the Cold War, or even a protracted “interwar” (167), as proposed by contributor Paul K. Saint-Amour, with the nuclear detonations at Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the post-9/11 “war...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2021) 67 (2): 109–138.
Published: 01 June 2021
... or back or in the middle. It was a push-button word, the way so many things were push-button now, the way the whole world opened behind a button that you pushed” ( U 516–17). The “push-button” nature of the Cold War household mirrors the nuclear technologies of the period and registers the explicitly...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2011) 57 (2): 264–271.
Published: 01 June 2011
... the only opinions possible without risking the epithets slacker or coward” (260). Throughout her study she argues that World War I propaganda sent the message that “the enemy is evil and dangerous and that the very core of civilization, the nuclear family, is in danger of being destroyed...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2010) 56 (2): 221–244.
Published: 01 June 2010
... of Extremes 562). The long-dominant, paralyzing fear that human civiliza- tion would bring about its own annihilation, a fear based on the actual distribution of global power after the Second World War into superstates that made it a matter of policy to threaten nuclear holocaust, has been replaced...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2013) 59 (2): 196–231.
Published: 01 June 2013
... in Chang-rae Lee’s Aloft the novel initially acknowledges the large-scale catastrophe in the near distance, it sinks comfortably into the well-mapped terrain of the post- war suburban novel as it recounts the travails of its amiable but detached protagonist. By novel’s end, Jerry himself suffers...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2007) 53 (3): 248–272.
Published: 01 September 2007
... disempower- m ent and insecurity associated w ith the early Cold War period, in which nuclear apocalypse could just as plausibly come about from a mistake made by one’s own government as an enemy attack.6 These details anchor The Crying of Lot 49 in its historical mom ent, a decade...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2013) 59 (4): 596–618.
Published: 01 December 2013
..., marry, and/or devote himself to fathering a nuclear family. 604 The City and the Pillar, Giovanni’s Room, and the Straight-Acting Gay Man Certainly Jim lives an adult life that contests Cold War notions of conformity, marriage, and the nuclear family, and in this sense, he is outside...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2018) 64 (3): 371–378.
Published: 01 September 2018
... in the midst of the Cold War, but the investigation of Du Bois warrants careful attention. Du Bois’s growing disillusionment with the capitalist imperialism of US foreign policy in the final decade of his life led him into conflict with the government over such issues as the Korean War, nuclear disarmament...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2000) 46 (4): 470–491.
Published: 01 December 2000
... and extending rights to women, workers, blacks, and other ra­ cial minorities—history effectively ended with the Battle of Jena (“End of History?” 5). Since then, there have been a few complications (world wars, communism, fascism, the threat of a nuclear apocalypse brought about by an “updated...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2016) 62 (4): 463–470.
Published: 01 December 2016
... of the 1930s” or as a star in “recovery scholarship,” Storm Jameson might well be on the cusp of a true revival. As part of Northwestern University Press’s series “Cultural Expressions of World War II,” the second major biography of this always engaging, never flawless, luminary of twentieth-century British...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (2017) 63 (4): 507–512.
Published: 01 December 2017
... took to the stage to address the vast crowd and drew a historical parallel to exhort her listeners toward solidarity and political resistance: “We cannot fall into despair. As the poet W. H. Auden once wrote on the eve of World War II: ‘We must love one another or die.’” The marchers cheered...