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nora

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 391–412.
Published: 01 December 2006
... Robin the best, it’s to you she turns. — The doctor to Nora, Nightwood (152) I n the midst of the baroque, the haphazard, the seemingly gratuitous flourishes of Dr. Matthew O ’Connor, Nightwood foists upon its reader a set of propositions about same-sex love...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): vi–viii.
Published: 01 June 2014
... further surprising encounters and apparitions: between Naomi Schor and Jacques Derrida on the function of the detail, between Pierre Nora and Emmanuel Levinas on sites of memory and the appearance of the other. While Nora circumscribes memory within the space of the nation-state, Sebald...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): 137–168.
Published: 01 June 2014
..., I argue furthermore, but also those of the memorial site (Pierre Nora’s lieux de mémoire); and his presence conscripts the reader into those self-other relations whose internal disjunctions have been so suggestively described by Emmanuel Levinas in Totality and Infinity (1961), relations...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 287–321.
Published: 01 September 2009
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2000) 46 (2): 125–149.
Published: 01 June 2000
... dilemma regarding this character: how are we to interpret Matthew’s self-centeredness? The doctor can hardly be called the novel’s main character. The book is not about him but about Baron Felix Volkbein, who marries the enigmatic Robin Vote and is abandoned by her, and about Nora Flood, who has a...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): 251–258.
Published: 01 June 2014
... homosexuality is unhealthy for the body and soul” (234). In Nightwood, the cross-dressing O’Connor also suggests the performative nature of identity. Nora, who is unable to understand what went wrong in her relationship with Robin, desperately asks him for advice. “Tell me everything you know about the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 21–48.
Published: 01 March 2017
..., eternal, and personal present in which, she writes, “infinite hunger / yearns at the rim of the world, / famine gnaws my bones” (1994, 67). Pierre Nora observes that cultural memory relies “on the materiality of the trace, the immediacy of the recording, the visibility of the image” (1989, 13), on...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2001) 47 (3): 407–430.
Published: 01 September 2001
... watch the film of A Midsummer Night’s Dream in which they had acted in their youth: “Gawd!” says Nora. “We were a pretty girl!” “Enough to make you weep,” agrees Dora (Carter 110). That is, while the motion picture image preserves youth, it also calls attention to mortality...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2005) 51 (3): 385–390.
Published: 01 September 2005
..., Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Nora Okja Keller, and Anchee Min, Duncan extends and enriches our understanding of the rhetorical functions and pitfalls of silence in the works of these writers. While the study is admirably grounded in existing scholarship in Asian American theory...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2008) 54 (1): 31–46.
Published: 01 March 2008
..., Dorothy Cheston Bennett, records that he drank Parisian tap water at least twice— just before and just after dining with James and Nora Joyce for the first time (156). Although little is known about the particulars of Bennett and Joyce s encounters in Paris, for Joyce at least, they seem to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2014) 60 (1): 27–58.
Published: 01 March 2014
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2018) 64 (1): 53–78.
Published: 01 March 2018