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nightwood

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2000) 46 (2): 125–149.
Published: 01 June 2000
...Sarah Henstra Copyright © Hofstra University 2000 Looking the Part: Performative Narration in Djuna Barnes’s Nightwood and Katherine Mansfield’s “Je Ne Parle Pas Français” Sa r a h H e n s t r a n the early part of the twentieth century...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 391–412.
Published: 01 December 2006
...Merrill Cole Copyright © Hofstra University 2006 Backwards Ventriloquy: The Historical Uncanny in Barnes’s Nightwood Merrill Cole N ot those who had seen him last, but me who had seen him best, as if my memory of him were himself; and because you forget...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 287–321.
Published: 01 September 2009
... memorialized in Nightwood. Richard Enright was the commissioner who publicly pledged to stamp out the “depraved tastes” of the “new underworld” in the Village, to make it “unattractive to the sightseer” and restore it “to its previous status as a respectable residential and business...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 333–340.
Published: 01 June 2012
...” (104). Seitler contends that Djuna Barnes’s Nightwood (1937) should be read in a 334 Review similar vein, focusing on Robin’s perversion and “decline to a lower order of humanity” (116), and she herself reads all the characters in Barnes’s text as “sexual subjects in a state of bestial...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): 251–258.
Published: 01 June 2014
... to Berlin (1939), Barnes’s Nightwood (1937), and Woolf’s Between the Acts (1941). Spiro argues in her introduction that “these three novels deploy an anti-Nazi aesthetic and warn their readers against [Nazism’s] allure in strikingly complementary ways” (10). Calling the three novels “‘anti...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2012) 58 (3): 524–531.
Published: 01 September 2012
... turns to “the ends of satire” in Nightwood (1936) and Molloy (1951). Greenberg’s rough chronology is less important to the book’s co- herence than is his treatment of feeling’s relation to aesthetics, which is supported by sustained references to and fluid discussions of philosophers of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2016) 62 (2): 231–239.
Published: 01 June 2016
... burgeoning sexuality, banished and Benjy’s radical otherness annulled by the omniscient narration of part IV. Berger then reads Robin from Djuna Barnes’s Nightwood in relation to Stevie and Benjy, a pairing he admits is not particularly convincing given that these latter characters clearly suffer from...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2017) 63 (2): 228–236.
Published: 01 June 2017
... abstract and formal equivalent of the state of being less. The word petropus from Nightwood that Sherry pluralizes in his title can reasonably be read as mock-Latin, as he proposes, considering the central male character O’Connor’s self-proclaimed connection to Latin, though as Sherry notes it is...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): 259–266.
Published: 01 June 2014
... Oedipal narrative, the distancing effects of the “freak tableau,” much like that of the freak-show spiel in Puddn’head Wilson, strip Freudian thought of its authority and encourage audiences to see it as yet another theatrical gimmick. At the start of Chapter Three, which focuses on Nightwood...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 359–364.
Published: 01 September 2017
... engagement with tradition, mortality, and memory. “The Erotics of Mortal Obligation,” chapter 3, pays welcome attention to the undersung connection between Djuna Barnes and T. S. Eliot, dwelling on how Nightwood rejects The Waste Land ’s attempted repatriation of the dead. Barnes’s novel is handled...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2002) 48 (2): 215–238.
Published: 01 June 2002
... idea is also implicit in Cyril Connolly’s account of conversion in Enemies of Promise, first published in 1938. Connolly was extremely sympathetic to the antirealist, modernist aesthetic promoted by Eliot’s editorial work, singling out Barnes’s Nightwood and Jones’s difficult hy­ brid poem...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2005) 51 (1): 114–122.
Published: 01 March 2005
... 46.4 (2000): 470-491 Hemingway, Ernest. See Adair; Hannum Henstra, Sarah. “Looking the Part: Performative Narration in Djuna Barnes’s Nightwood and Katherine Mansfield’s ‘Je Ne Parle Pas Français 46.2 (2000): 125-149 Herseyjohn. See Sharp H.D. See Hickman, Wheeler Hickman...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2004) 50 (4): 394–420.
Published: 01 December 2004
... significance than mere isolated moments of evaluation and judgment. It demands, he claims, the sort of “hypersensi­ tive awareness” that alone grants the individual some degree of “helpless power among the helpless” (Introduction, Nightwood xiii). Eliot’s conclusion is ultimately that the soul may...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2001) 47 (3): 325–354.
Published: 01 September 2001
... Vote in Djuna 340 H.D.’s N igh ts Barnes’s Nightwood, Natalia ultimately eludes all attempts to define and describe her, to pin her down. Once having accepted the possibility that the geometric body in Nights is held up as an ideal, if ambivalently, we then also need to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 148–179.
Published: 01 June 2011
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2014) 60 (4): 423–454.
Published: 01 December 2014