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mulligan

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2005) 51 (4): 391–413.
Published: 01 December 2005
... Stephen to think about Yeats’s poetry and even to deconstruct Yeats’s language in his head or on paper, but almost never to voice Yeats’s words aloud. The comic foil Buck Mulligan speaks for Yeats instead, em­ phasizing the degree to which Yeats’s handling of love lies at the heart of Stephen’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2009) 55 (2): 232–254.
Published: 01 June 2009
... recites poetry and song lyrics or composes lines in his head that influence his movements through Dublin. As Stephen continues to scan his walk along Sandymount, he mentally composes another rhyme (this one to Mulligan’s critical aunt), and once again, “His feet marched in sudden proud...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 267–298.
Published: 01 September 2017
... left unfinished in Portrait . His quest for the essence of things, for the “uncreated conscience of [his] race” ( P 224) that he so ardently desired at the end of Portrait , is grimly sent up in Mulligan’s clownish restaging of symbolic action. He has resisted every temptation to be guided by the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 378–392.
Published: 01 September 2009
... the feminine principle in a trinity of authorial figures. What traditional readings tend to disregard is the substantial number of minor artist figures in the novel, including Malachi Mulligan, the novel’s inaugu- ral performer, whose (self-fashioned?) first name means “my messenger”; Simon...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 224–254.
Published: 01 June 2011
... Mulligan, quoting Swinburne, calls the sea) whom he “could not save” (3.329) from cancer, but the more general economic fate of Dubliners struggling to keep their heads above water. Thus the topos of drowning returns in “Wandering Rocks” as Stephen registers his sister’s desperation in trying to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2001) 47 (2): 197–216.
Published: 01 June 2001
... who is an unassimilated modernist influence in the poem. As Keith Alleyne rightly notes in a contemporaneous review, “Eliot is not merely an influence, but a complete formula, through the whole succes­ sion ofjoyce and Stephen Daedalus, Buck Mulligan and Hamlet,Telemachus and Dante and Virgil...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2013) 59 (4): 575–595.
Published: 01 December 2013
... keyhole. The imagery may also suggest such associations of the ocean with both maternal life-giving and death-bringing as occur in Ulysses; for Buck Mulligan the sea is both “our great sweet mother” (1.80) and “our mighty mother” (1.85) in which a man has recently drowned. It would be a...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 299–328.
Published: 01 September 2017