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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 267–298.
Published: 01 September 2017
... (literally “whatness”) or thingness of the object. In Ulysses , Stephen learns a more valuable lesson: what lies in the liminal territory of his apprehension constitutes a knowable element of the object that lies beyond its sensible appearance. The “esthetic image” that illuminates his mind in A Portrait is...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 394–405.
Published: 01 September 2007
...Ellen Spolsky Why We Read Fiction: Theory of Mind and the Novel , by Zunshine Lisa , Columbus : Ohio State University Press , 2006 . 198 pages. Copyright © Hofstra University 2007 m Reviews How to Do Things with Novels Why We Read Fiction: Theory of Mind and the Novel by Lisa...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2013) 59 (4): 539–574.
Published: 01 December 2013
..., units of matter in dynamic (chemical or gravitational) interaction.1 The lines demonstrate Merrill’s close identification of mental losses with material ones, and reveal in a rather minimal but clear form Merrill’s absorption of language and imagery from the sciences of the mind. Less clear is...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2006) 52 (3): 306–329.
Published: 01 September 2006
... in [Bishop’s] work feels like a sympathy without skin extending deeply and unnervingly everywhere” (56). Both scholars are describing the strangeness of a mind that somehow lacks the usual membrane between itself and the surrounding world. Put another way, it’s a membrane that has...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 131–167.
Published: 01 June 2010
... trends and ideas she expressed a much older understanding of women’s same-sex desires—a belief that they are com- mon to most women—and promoted it as epistemologically, aesthetically, and politically more useful to women than the beliefs about bifurcated sexual identity and dual-gendered minds...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): vi–x.
Published: 01 June 2010
... debilitatingly reductive thinking about desire, gender, and sexuality. In precisely this spirit of refusal, in the 1920s companion pieces, A Room and Orlando, Woolf is revealed to take on the modernist valorizing of the (male) artist as the androgynous mind and to do so in the name of the physical...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2018) 64 (1): 79–100.
Published: 01 March 2018
... no doubt right to insist on the centrality of reverence and continuity to Wharton’s social ideal; hers was, in the final analysis, a conservative mind. Still, his account of Wharton’s moral outlook fails to do justice to the complexity of her position, as it neglects to consider the vital role that...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2001) 47 (2): 241–267.
Published: 01 June 2001
... temporality in the culture of the 1920s. For Lewis, the “sub­ ject” is a “king” like Louis XVI or Nicholas II: that is, a toppled mon­ arch. The Cartesian cogito, the mind that is not the body, the entity that Lewis variously calls, with more freedom than professional philosophers would...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2018) 64 (3): 379–386.
Published: 01 September 2018
... assemble so cogently is that notions of the “impression” remain central not only to our aesthetics but also to our philosophy of mind, our economy, and our social and political life. “Impressionism,” says Matz, “is everywhere” (18). The opening chapter explores “Histories for the Tache”: the signature...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2004) 50 (3): 268–282.
Published: 01 September 2004
... him an aesthetic role model, painting his “perfectly useless concentration” as what “one seems to want in art, in experiencing it” and also the “thing that is necessary for its creation.” Implicitly, Bishop redirects Stevenson from one model of mind to another, 269 Zachariah...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2008) 54 (3): 362–387.
Published: 01 September 2008
... both we find an awareness of all facts as figurally realized—of the mingling of is with seems—and also an insistence that imagination does not generate the world out of itself but responds to a nature that, encircling and transcend­ ing mind, engages us creatively. It is nature’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 629–633.
Published: 01 December 2009
... of Human Living Comeuppance: Costly Signaling, Altruistic Punishment, and Other Biological Components of Fiction William Flesch Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2007. 252 pages William Benzon One inevitably approaches a new book with one’s mind stocked with various...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 369–376.
Published: 01 June 2013
... mind and culture by referencing its thirteen-century counterparts; or as he wrote to the Jesuit priest F. J. Yealy, “I confess that I maintain my prejudice in favour of the methods and frames of mind of the thirteenth century. You have no doubt gathered that my criticisms were not directed...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2010) 56 (3): 405–413.
Published: 01 September 2010
... that the image or scenario to which the modern artist is compulsively drawn is often itself a depiction of compulsion and passivity, a moment when the imagination is overwhelmed by its own creative ener- gies, or when the mind succumbs to its own powerful affective...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 78–99.
Published: 01 March 2000
...” (298). Potentially diverging lines are pressured into “a system of converging beams.” Eye movements then follow preordained linear paths, rather than slipping off to the sides or revolving like the lighthouse beams. Intuitive movement extends beyond the visual frame composed by eye and mind...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2006) 52 (2): 111–144.
Published: 01 June 2006
... expression (facial, linguistic, and artistic) may not reveal anything about the interior. Rather, even what we think of as interior may turn out to be an automatic reflection (as by a parrot or a mirror) of what others have already said or done. Woman with a Parrot: Other mind or automaton? Manet’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2017) 63 (4): 405–426.
Published: 01 December 2017
... mind the variants and indeterminacy that loom so large in Dickinson’s production, at least in the minds of her contemporary critics. Pechman sees in Moore’s work the hallmark of the perpetually “unfinished,” then, much in opposition to a certain kind of lyric monumentality that is perhaps epitomized by...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2001) 47 (3): 355–373.
Published: 01 September 2001
... Morgans promise to assist with Arnette’s upcoming college expenses. When Steward asks if Arnette might not change her mind about going to college, Jeff snaps, “I’m her father. I’ll arrange her mind” (61). At the first mention of col­ lege, Steward asks when school begins. Told it starts in...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 100–114.
Published: 01 March 2000
... minds of the soldiers who fought that battle is not conveyed by clinical data. To uncover that is the task of fiction. This is precisely the task that Tim O’Brien undertakes. The essential dialectic of the war story lies in this interplay between reality as data and the reality of the human...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2004) 50 (4): 394–420.
Published: 01 December 2004
... creative process to bursts of “fitful lyric inspiration,” thereby denying the active, rational mind of the craftsman its rightful place.2 Quoting Paul Valéry, Eliot maintains that the poet must be neither an automaton nor a madman but a “cool scientist, almost an algebraist, in the service of a...