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mimic

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2000) 46 (2): 214–237.
Published: 01 June 2000
...Robert M. Greenberg Copyright © Hofstra University 2000 Anger and the Alchemy of Literary Method in V. S. Naipaul’s Political Fiction: The Case of The Mimic Men Robert M. Greenberg . S. Naipaul’s fiction and nonfiction since the 1960s have reflected an...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2008) 54 (3): 339–361.
Published: 01 September 2008
... at worst soul destroying. In Saladin Chamcha, whose family name means toady or flatterer, and who makes a career of speaking like a perfect Eng­ lishman, Rushdie repeats the trope, familiar from postcolonial literature of the 1960s and 70s, of the colonial mimic as a debilitating figure. When he...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2009) 55 (2): 232–254.
Published: 01 June 2009
... ordinary emetic” (Brooker 26–27). Fears of the text’s effects on the bodies of readers contributed to bans on Joyce’s works, for as Katherine Mullin points out, a “kinetic model of reading was assumed by most social purity campaigners. . . . The theory that young people were drawn to mimic what...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2013) 59 (1): 37–78.
Published: 01 March 2013
... back to colonial authority and its (double) agents, “mimic men” like the Constab, affirming her agency despite the all too real constraints that authority and those agents exert on a “poo’ weak gal” like her (l. 39).27 Thus as the Apple-Woman negotiates the legal and penal limitations that the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2005) 51 (1): 114–122.
Published: 01 March 2005
...: Radclyffe Hall’s The Well of Loneliness and Modernist Fictions of Identity.” 49.3 (2003): 277-297 116 Index Greenberg, Robert M. “Anger and the Alchemy of Literary Method in V. S. Naipaul’s Political Fiction: The Case of The Mimic Men. ” 46.2 (2000): 214-237 Gregory, Alyse...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2007) 53 (2): vi–x.
Published: 01 June 2007
... essay’s conclusions mimic the concilia­ tory gestures of the novel’s ending, but in order to reach either we are compelled to negotiate our way through many of the transfor­ mations in literary/critical/theoretical practice that have occurred over the last three decades—the emergence of the “implied...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2001) 47 (2): 197–216.
Published: 01 June 2001
... works out his relationship to Joyce better in Omeros because he now mimics Joyce more explicitly in terms of both resis­ tance and praise. In Walcott’s own words, he both “reverses and honours” Joyce (Omeros 68). The pun on “reverses” suggests both a rewriting (a re-versing...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2008) 54 (3): 362–387.
Published: 01 September 2008
... Boy of Winander Blew mimic hootings to the silent owls, That they might answer him; and they would shout Across the watery vale, and shout again, Responsive to his call, with quivering peals, And long halloos and screams and echoes loud, Redoubled and redoubled (172...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2007) 53 (1): 23–39.
Published: 01 March 2007
.... See Ismond’s “WalcottVersus Brathwaite,” Charles W. Pollard (28-29), and Bruce King. 3. Walcott’s observations on Caribbean mimicry are to a large extent a response to books such as Naipaul’s The Middle Passage and The Mimic Men. 4. The shift of emphasis is gradual. For example, Walcott points...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2011) 57 (3-4): 291–308.
Published: 01 December 2011
... “oral culture”—which is, itself, a long- standing description of the central project of ethnic American literatures. We are indebted to Maria A. Windell for this insight. 8. For example, in “The Politics of a Good Picture,” an essay on Jeff Wall’s 1982 photograph Mimic, Michaels reads the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2013) 59 (1): 164–173.
Published: 01 March 2013
... more complicated than that: “Her work does not simply mimic or counter children’s culture, but engages it in diverse and even contradictory ways.” Beginning with chapter 3, Bryant turns from modernist to postwar woman poets. Gwendolyn Brooks is her next subject, and here her work is read...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 March 2001
... metaphoric cannibalism is a form of hysterical mimicry in the sense that it reproduces the logic of master discourses but does so in such a way that this logic begins to decon­ struct itself. Her consumption of her mother mimics and deconstructs the racist representation of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2009) 55 (1): 36–57.
Published: 01 March 2009
... right point, inter­ locking, correct, correct again, each rightness snapping loose, floating, hook in the air, swirling, seed-down, quick—the evidence of the visual henceforth—and henceforth, loosening— These exhalations of the mind mimic the activities of the river: they jar...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 305–329.
Published: 01 September 2015
... swerve, two wheels lifted in the air, brakes on, bump with tree at edge of embankment, standstill” (94). The syntax here mimics the experience of the accident, sacrificing grammar for immediacy of rendering, and concretizing the upheaval their animal attraction seems to threaten to the rational...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2016) 62 (4): 403–428.
Published: 01 December 2016
...” ( Abbott 2010 , 6), his anachrony is also unusual for being mimetic, though not, as in Proust, mimetic of memory’s fluidity; instead it mimics a model of development Huxley adapted from contemporary biological research, much of it by his brother Julian, on frogs and salamanders. For both Huxleys, personal...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2017) 63 (2): 191–212.
Published: 01 June 2017
... very much that kind of goodness. (154) Here, Melanctha’s insistent gerunds agitate against the practice of dogmatic uplift ideals “all the time,” and the repetitive prose rhythms mimic the pull of temptation. Puncturing Campbell’s fragile self-regard, she points to his fears—“You is so afraid you will...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 213–237.
Published: 01 June 2012
... not an uncommon plot device in domestic fiction—especially the Gothic—Wharton’s choice to focalize Hartley’s perspective in part mimics the discursive trends in Progressive-era domestic reforms. At the time “The Lady’s Maid’s Bell” was published, periodicals were showcasing articles about...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2011) 57 (3-4): 492–515.
Published: 01 December 2011
... configuring the sexual terrain of contemporary writing. To be sure, Hollinghurst remains alert to the specificity of the heritage he extends in order not simply to mimic it; but Impressionism also helps him to articu- late fresh possibilities for gender critique in the twenty-first century by making it...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2009) 55 (1): 1–35.
Published: 01 March 2009
... Twentieth-Century Literature 55.1 Spring 2009 1 Aaron Easdey healer into a politician, initiating a personal metamorphosis that culmi­ nates in his becoming G. Ramsay Muir, M. B. E., a West Indian envoy operating in England and a shameless British mimic man (220Nineteen forty-six” is heralded in...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 462–492.
Published: 01 December 2010
... company “a number of airlines,” and “many stores in the city” (4). The narrator of The Mimic Men (1967) bemoans the commercialization of his native island, noting that in “the recent tourist publicity for Isabella,” boys who will dive for small change and even rotten fruit “are again presented as...