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midwest

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2013) 59 (1): 104–125.
Published: 01 March 2013
... de-regionalizing of African American writers in the Midwest is far more typical.1 As African Americans migrated north and west in the wake of the Civil War and into the Modern era, extending the African American diaspora, they were instrumental in defining the distinct flavor of the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2011) 57 (1): 105–113.
Published: 01 March 2011
... . . . and, conversely, the representation of the American Midwest as banal and culturally stifling.” Following Catherine Jurca, Giles reminds us that the spatial orthodoxies of interwar modernism “fed into 108 Review the idea . . . of the suburb as a bastion of conformity existing in a cultur...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2006) 52 (1): 42–60.
Published: 01 March 2006
.... But the story moves by fits and starts, punctuated continually by comic digressions recounting the history of Zoe’s years as a professor in the Midwest, her life as a home owner, and the revolving door of failed romantic interests.Thus, for example, Zoe’s response to a student’s ques­ tion...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2010) 56 (1): 122–129.
Published: 01 March 2010
... writers from all over the economic and regional maps. McGurl details Engle’s insistence that the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, located in the heart of the Midwest, celebrates excellence rather than regionalism. Fueled by federal money, other American universities—most notably Johns Hopkins, the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2013) 59 (4): 681–689.
Published: 01 December 2013
... Agee’s dirt-poor Alabama to Franzen’s humiliating Midwest, the American landscape is a broad record of failure and disap- pointment. (Hence, Arthur believes, Kerouac’s productive need to keep moving.) Another implication is that the creative and critical energy that goes into reinvigorating these...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 327–344.
Published: 01 September 2007
... dimensions tended silendy to occlude. This was the basis for the idealiza­ tion o f the city as a privileged site for m odern art and architecture in the 1920s, and conversely, the representation o f the American Midwest as banal and culturally stifling in the work o f Sherwood Anderson...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2003) 49 (1): 1–11.
Published: 01 March 2003
... and what­ ever others American writers found necessary. This “France” is, again, a construct, a supplely subjective projection born in fact and cliché, and shaped by personal and artistic need. Lost in her Midwest, Cather turned gratefully to Sand’s parallel explorations of a woman’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2007) 53 (2): 153–181.
Published: 01 June 2007
... York, but with the snow of his MidWest. (104) If the trains that travel to New York run through the anomic gray of racial and ethnic admixture, the trains that travel home to the Midwest, on which Nick and his WASP schoolmates are “unutterably aware of our identity with this country...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2017) 63 (2): 167–190.
Published: 01 June 2017
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2019) 65 (1-2): 145–166.
Published: 01 March 2019
... drunk at the Hungry Duck, and take a Russian girl home for $50.” In Shteyngart’s novel, Misha Vainberg’s best friend from the Midwest, Robert Lipshitz (nicknamed Alyosha-Bob), also moves to Russia, becoming the proprietor of “ExcessHollywood, a profitable DVD import-export business, and the swain of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 199–223.
Published: 01 June 2011
... Africa, London, Paris, Cairo, and the Midwest of the Unit- ed States” (16) Thus the experience of space in Naked Lunch is defined by the kinds of time-space compression that David Harvey argues underpin the spatial logic of late capitalism,18 as Burroughs collapses geographically diverse...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2011) 57 (3-4): 516–538.
Published: 01 December 2011
... must take on the interstate corridors of the upper Midwest, while Poe’s story tracks his equally life-or-death decisions as an inmate in state prison. As each young man leaves a crumbling home far behind, he discovers himself embroiled in an “ancient relationship”: “Wolf or sheep, if you didn’t...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2007) 53 (4): 488–517.
Published: 01 December 2007
... glossolalia. The scene is a char­ ismatic church in the Midwest; his parents are full of the Spirit, but he himself cannot summon a spiritual tongue, and indeed is paralyzed by the preacher’s unrelenting rhetoric. The reader receives the language of this preacher indirectly, mediated by the narrator...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2019) 65 (1-2): 71–96.
Published: 01 March 2019
... nature of the United States and reflects her existential crisis. She experiences even the solid, Protestant, and no-nonsense Midwest as a composite of literary and pop-cultural references, and as an endlessly replicated mirror-image of “our civilization and culture” ( Blažević 1989 : 21). 13 This...