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midnight

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 470–491.
Published: 01 December 2000
...Teresa Heffernan Copyright © Hofstra University 2001 Apocalyptic Narratives: The Nation in Salman Rushdie’s Midnights Children Teresa Heffernan The radically performative laying down of the law by the legislator must create the very context...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 510–544.
Published: 01 December 2001
...Patrick Colm Hogan Copyright © Hofstra University 2002 Midnight's Children: Kashmir and the Politics of Identity Patrick Colm Hogan M . Keith Booker has recently drawn attention to a common ten­ dency in the interpretive criticism of Salman Rushdie, and indeed of much...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 545–568.
Published: 01 December 2001
...John J. Su Copyright © Hofstra University 2002 ULI Epic of Failure: Disappointment as Utopian Fantasy in Midnight's Children John J. Su And so, by a strange and melancholy paradox, the moment of failure is the moment of value; the comprehending and experi­ encing...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 431–443.
Published: 01 December 2001
... and scope of literature, its responsibility and freedom. But it would be unfair to suggest that Rushdie’s significance as a writer is entirely indebted to the accident of the fatwa.The appearance of Midnight’s Children in 1981 was a remarkable event in its own right. For many...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2005) 51 (1): 114–122.
Published: 01 March 2005
... 47.3 (2001): 374-390 Hannum, Howard LScared sick looking at it’:A Reading of Nick Adams in the Published Stories.” 47.1 (2001): 92—113 Hays,Tony. See Durham Heaney, Seamus. See Boly Heffernan,Teresa. “Apocalyptic Narratives: The Nation in Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2005) 51 (4): 437–466.
Published: 01 December 2005
... ear narration, often presented through interior monologues, novels such as Voyage in the Dark and Good Morning, Midnight exemplify modernist fragmentation while intimating a deeper sense of pain and loss than most accounts of such fragmentation acknowledge. In spite of the strong under­ tone...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 102–106.
Published: 01 March 2017
... The Midnight . This feat alone demonstrates Keniston’s critical facility and the significance of her new volume. Keniston’s close readings are consistently well done and often riveting, and she has structured the volume so that it unfolds a transformation in the mechanics of poetic figuration, at...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 355–364.
Published: 01 June 2012
... to fictional world-making. Turning to Rushdie, Trousdale pays minute attention to “the incom- pleteness of Indian cosmopolitanism” (91) and the dire consequences of such an imperfect vision. Her first chapter on Rushdie, titled “Cosmo- politanism and the Shiv Sena in Midnight’s Children and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 569–595.
Published: 01 December 2001
...Alexandra W. Schultheis Copyright © Hofstra University 2002 Postcolonial Lack and Aesthetic Promise in The Moor’s Last Sigh Alexandra W. Schultheis I n his documentary film The Riddle of Midnight, Salman Rushdie re­ turns to India 40 years after independence to see if a...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 596–618.
Published: 01 December 2001
... Syed Shahabuddin to call for The Satanic Verses to be banned in India (Appig­ nanesi 37-41)—Rushdie concurs in seeing Midnight’s Children, Shame, and The Satanic Verses as “a body of work,” and The Satanic Verses as the last of a trilogy. The trilogy moves steadily westward, especially in its...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2008) 54 (3): 339–361.
Published: 01 September 2008
... different purposes, and to the devil with historicity or truth. (Step 166) O f course, that last phrase— “to the devil with historicity or truth”—is ironic coming from the author of The Satanic Verses, where the devil- narrator treats the Prophet (as in an earlier novel, Midnight’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2005) 51 (2): 142–178.
Published: 01 June 2005
..., predicting the time left before the end of human history, stood at seven minutes before midnight (169); by January 1981 it stood at four minutes to midnight (l).1 In 1993 the Union of Concerned Scien­ tists issued its Warning to Humanity, predicting that “if not checked, many of our current...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 267–295.
Published: 01 June 2012
... Read against the industry-inspiring success of his better-known works, Rushdie’s debut novel Grimus (1975) is often regarded as the artis- tically tentative effort of the author who would, in his maturity, go on to write Midnight’s Children (1981). The relative dearth of critical responses to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): 197–221.
Published: 01 June 2014
... black snipers on the West Side (two were dead, hundreds were in detention), he composed that electrify- ing speech, “A Knock at Midnight.” (13) Despite its immediate grounding in a past historical moment, considering the publication date and the artistic genesis of the project, one...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2016) 62 (1): 56–74.
Published: 01 March 2016
..., blood, suet and sweat,—the rigamarole / of wine and mandolins. Midnight; and maybe love” (3–4)—the young man becomes a figure for the prospect of a productive life of uncomplicated beauty and happiness. Ultimately, Crane decided not to include “Lenses” in The Bridge , either because the island setting...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 467–509.
Published: 01 December 2001
..., and Midnight’s Children, his most widely acclaimed novel. The entire world of Grimus is engulfed in the closing pages by existentially obliterating mists. In Midnight’s Children, the generation of children born on the mid­ night of India’s independence are finally wiped out by the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 387–395.
Published: 01 December 2000
... discussion of Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children, Teresa Heffernan describes the tensions, illuminated by apocalyptic violence, between universal and nationalist ideals in postcolonial discourses—the conflict, in this case, between being a citizen of a civil state and being an Indian in an Indian...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2013) 59 (3): 385–413.
Published: 01 September 2013
... (even if final) redirection elsewhere. They write, The question what is philosophy? can perhaps be posed only late in life, with the arrival of old age and the time for speaking concretely. . . .It is a question posed in a moment of quiet rest- lessness, at midnight, when...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2011) 57 (3-4): 354–363.
Published: 01 December 2011
... contemporary comics are “historiographic metafiction,” Hutcheon’s compelling assessment of what constitutes the poetics of postmodernism. (Why hadn’t she included a text like Art Spiegelman’s Maus along with her analyses of J. M. Coetzee’s Foe and Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children, I wondered with...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2001) 47 (2): 197–216.
Published: 01 June 2001
..., see Brath- waite’s Contradictory Omens; for liminality, see Bhabha’s Location; for chutnifica- 212 Walcott and Joyce tion, see Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children; for rhizomes, see Glissant’s Caribbean Discourse and Poetics of Relation and Benitez-Rojo’s The Repeating Island; and for...