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margaret

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 232–259.
Published: 01 June 2013
...Derek Furr 2013 Derek Furr Re-Sounding Folk Voice, Remaking the Ballad: Alan Lomax, Margaret Walker, and the New Criticism Derek Furr From the British Romantic period through the first decades of the twentieth century, the literary ballad was a commonly practiced form, some...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 180–198.
Published: 01 June 2011
... “it is the privilege of art to exaggerate,” Forster directs attention to his own art, which is to say to his own exaggeration of these improvisational intervals, which is to say to the queer invitations that make them possible. Margaret Schlegel at first fails to accept the queer invitation...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2008) 54 (2): 193–216.
Published: 01 June 2008
... the human cost of capitalism” (339) that allow Forster to work through his guilt over living off the fruits of a system he finds unjust and dehumanizing, yet without which he would not have had the means to become a writer. Others claim that it is the characters Margaret and Helen...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2005) 51 (1): 43–63.
Published: 01 March 2005
... thematic vision. For Stone, Margaret and Helen Schlegel are domineering, destructive elitists who, having established at Howards End an idyllic sanctuary of “personal relations” and “the inner life,” permit the devastated, uncomprehending Henry Wilcox to reside there. Stone’s withering critique...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2000) 46 (3): 328–345.
Published: 01 September 2000
... his age by delin­ eating a world in which personal objects and places act as repositories for a sentimental “value” that exceeds the vicissitudes of commerce and commodification. The novel articulates an ambivalent fascination with ma­ terial substances of all types, as Margaret...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 239–266.
Published: 01 September 2017
... Flinders propose a radical literary magazine; Bruno’s cousin and love interest, Elizabeth Leonard, makes her prodigal return from the artistic enclaves of Europe; and Miles and his wife Margaret Flinders negotiate marital peril. These plotlines are marked by inaction and negation: work on the magazine’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 115–124.
Published: 01 March 2000
... Ammons, A. R. See Adames Ashbery, John. See Gilson; Norton; Vincent Atwood, Margaret. See Cambell; Deery; Hite Ausubel, Jonathan. “‘This hot, dependent orator’: Shifting Narrative Stance and the Collision of Speaker and Reader in Notes toward a Supreme Fiction. ” 42.3 (1996): 360-73 Ba...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2016) 62 (4): 463–470.
Published: 01 December 2016
... starting point for entering Jameson’s dauntingly large canon and offers potential critics a means to navigate important but overlooked texts in twentieth-century studies. Inevitably, some comparison will be made between Maslen’s work and Jennifer Birkett’s Margaret Storm Jameson: A Life , the first major...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2008) 54 (1): 75–96.
Published: 01 March 2008
.... Both focus on a family group representing the flower of that civilization: the Schlegel sisters, Margaret and Helen, and their brother Toby in Howards End; the Perownes in Saturday. In both works the presiding group is challenged by sudden contact with a trespassing other from a subaltern...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): vi–viii.
Published: 01 June 2014
... pastness in an evolving present” and by inviting the reader into their “networks of identification” (a phrase the author cites from Margaret Olin on Barthes), they retain and assert a “necessarily discontinuous and anti-totalizing power.” But as we engage with the photographs, they elude us...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 393–400.
Published: 01 September 2009
... Stallworthy’s Round- ing the Horn the two poems about Keynes, “For Margaret and Geoffrey Keynes” and “In Memory of Geoffrey Keynes KT late of Lammas House,” and it is also clear in “Who Was Rupert Brooke?” that Stallworthy has 394 Review a great deal of affection for Brooke, who has become rather...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2003) 49 (1): 46–81.
Published: 01 March 2003
... writ­ ers, including Gertrude Stein, Janet Flanner, and Djuna Barnes. But within this context, one subgroup of American women writers has largely es­ caped critical attention. Margaret Anderson, Jane Heap, Solita Solano, and Kathryn Hulme were all students of expatriate Armenian and self-pro...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2003) 49 (1): 82–102.
Published: 01 March 2003
... preferences as the literature of modernism. (43) Thus, far from viewing Joyce and Agatha Christie as polar opposites, Nicholas Birns and Margaret Boe Birns see the latter as herself“aesthet- ically modernist” (120). Moreover, by focusing on “Christie’s formalism, on what her critics have...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2007) 53 (1): 67–73.
Published: 01 March 2007
... beauty and desire celebrated in the Song of Songs” (Wirth-Nesher 137), and by implication with the witnessing mother Rosa and the “golden-haired Margarete,” whose name evokes the object of desire of Goethe’s Faust. Wirth-Nesher informs us that Goethe himself translated the Song o f Songs...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 269–276.
Published: 01 June 2010
... without lasting success (Kay Boyle, Frederic Prokosch), some sold successfully while being panned by the intelligentsia (Margaret Mitchell, Laura Hobson), and some achieved both praise and sales yet passed into obscurity nonetheless (Josephine Lawrence). Hutner’s purpose, however, is not to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2001) 47 (2): 217–240.
Published: 01 June 2001
...” in this puritan-ridden country.. .. I don’t think that anything can be done. I’ll fight for you, but it’s a lost cause. You’re idiots, both of you .You haven’t an ounce of sense. — Margaret Anderson, My Thirty Years’ War (215) A s it turns out...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2016) 62 (2): 197–222.
Published: 01 June 2016
... recording!” ( Brittain 1957 , 79). In response, recent feminist scholarship has sought to bring accounts of female wartime work to the forefront of Great War testimony. Through her recovery of texts by women—writers, nurses, and other participants in World War I—Margaret Higonnet, for example, has contested...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 21–48.
Published: 01 March 2017
... history of this particular sculptural group in the context of her excellent analysis of Irish Famine memorial culture. According to Margaret Kelleher, “the sculptural work takes its inspiration in part from an account in the Irish Quarterly Review of 1851: ‘A procession fraught...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 582–605.
Published: 01 December 2012
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 March 2001
... to arrive. The novel is based on the true story of Margaret Gar­ ner, an escaped slave who killed her daughter in a desperate bid to save her from the misery and indignity of slavery when threatened with re­ capture— a story very few people knew before the publication o f Mor­ rison’s book...