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lukac

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 273–297.
Published: 01 September 2007
.... — Georg Lukács (“Thoughts” 16) I f we agree with Fredric Jameson that historicizing works o f literature is always necessary (Political Unconscious 9), recent fiction poses a particular challenge, not so much because o f the difficulty o f gaining critical dis­ tance on our own times but...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 545–568.
Published: 01 December 2001
... life’s refusals is the source from which the fullness of life seems to flow. What is depicted [in the novel] is the total absence of any fulfillment of meaning, yet the work contains the rich and rounded fullness of a true totality of life. —Georg Lukács (126...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2008) 54 (1): 115–127.
Published: 01 March 2008
... emphasize modernism’s con­ nection with its capitalist context. Cooper looks at the modernist scene through a lens borrowed from Georg Lukács and describes the lived ex­ perience of reification, the impossibility of any art escaping reification’s gravity. Coméntale offers something more sanguine (if...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2014) 60 (1): 1–26.
Published: 01 March 2014
... Lukács’s The Historical Novel appeared in 1937, providing what remains the most thorough and most cited anatomization of the genre.11 Lukács casts the historical novel primarily as a realist genre. He declares its foremost task to be “the disclosure of all the contradictions of progress” (29...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2004) 50 (4): 433–435.
Published: 01 December 2004
..., Adams provides a theoretical foundation for his analysis of modernism, imperialism, and secularization in relation to the modernist novel. Drawing from the work of Edward Said, Fredric Jameson, Georg Lukács, and especially Hans Blumenberg, Adams argues that modernist colonial odysseys can be...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2013) 59 (3): 441–464.
Published: 01 September 2013
... briefly recalling Georg Lukács’s intervention in these debates. While Lukács acknowledges that the global economy is (already, in 1932) too complex and decentralized to depict in terms of traditional character relationships, he argues that representing this “sum of facts” about the global economy...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2018) 64 (4): 449–482.
Published: 01 December 2018
.... Similarly, in much nineteenth- and twentieth-century literary criticism, tragedy qua genre necessarily stood as a testament to the grandeur and solace of collective human destiny. Marxist theorist György Lukács thus decried the “transcendental homelessness” ([1916] 1971: 41) that for him was the hallmark of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2003) 49 (2): 131–163.
Published: 01 June 2003
... nomena causally (locating them as “a cause or an effect of human con­ duct”) and coordinating them—determining their “position and relative importance”—according to what Georg Lukács calls a “hierarchy of significance” (Meaning 34): binding the “typical” and broadly representa­ tive to the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2008) 54 (4): 538–543.
Published: 01 December 2008
...—between a sociology attuned to embodied agency and one attuned to social structure—has been the central problem of sociological theory since the 1960s. Moreover, as the Marxist critical-realist tradition stemming from Georg Lukács shows, the bourgeois novelistic tradition that Chodat extols...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 352–372.
Published: 01 September 2015
... can look away in order to leave be, or to set free. In his essay “Trying to Understand Endgame ,” Theodor Adorno reminds us, through his commentary on Georg Lukács’s estimation of Beckett’s modernism, that horrors of categorical judgment can be committed against Beckett’s work in the name of the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 221–244.
Published: 01 June 2010
... ironic that even as he honors Lessing’s achievements in realism, a form theorized perhaps most notably by the Marxist critic Georg Lukács, Wästberg reminds the author that she is guilty of having long ago, along with millions of others, held the “wrong” political philosophy. But...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2005) 51 (2): 123–141.
Published: 01 June 2005
... White does not take away a singular moral or plot line, but he or she does take away a revelation: the revelation that the ironic perspective is the one best suited to the contem­ porary situation. The reader of Snow White comes to a realization much like Lukacs’s in The Theory of the Novel...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2006) 52 (1): 22–41.
Published: 01 March 2006
... exploited producer. Passing through the money economy In Passing Larsen addresses Lukacs’s seminal question about the capacity of “the commodity structure to penetrate society in all its aspects and to remould it in its own image” (85) by depicting characters whose identities approximate the money...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 371–393.
Published: 01 September 2007
..., at least according to Lukács s claims for the novel after Balzac,11 what is more im portant here is that Middlesex does not exactly come up to the present. Its main action is split between the Stephanides family history, which runs from the early 1920s to the late 1950s, and the life o f its...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2015) 61 (4): 460–483.
Published: 01 December 2015
... novel’s own anxieties about creating historical texture ( Bowen 1999 , 451). This has traditionally been the danger of historical description, where motive and intention can get lost in excessive detail ( Lukács 1983 , 42). 10 In The Last September , description overwhelms the characters, who...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2008) 54 (4): 531–537.
Published: 01 December 2008
...- quarters of a century, from the so-called Brecht-Lukâcs debate down to the Language Poets: what is the relationship between avant-garde forms 534 Review of writing (modernist and postmodernist) and progressive politics? Or as DuPlessis puts it, “How to calibrate the political meanings and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2017) 63 (2): 228–236.
Published: 01 June 2017
... Beerbohm. The third interchapter, “Reforming Decadence: Late Romanticism, Modernism, and the Politics of Literary History,” is difficult to describe and, for me, to understand. Sherry evokes within it Percy Shelley, Wyndham Lewis, György Lukács, and Theodor Adorno, among others. It includes what must be...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2012) 58 (1): 150–158.
Published: 01 March 2012
... Izenberg’s argument is less than satisfying: not once does he reckon with the many critics of universalist humanism, from Marx through Lukács and Adorno and Horkheimer to Derrida and Spivak. Although in a few places he suggests that his universalism should be distinguished from other post...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2007) 53 (2): 125–152.
Published: 01 June 2007
... Wordsworth proposed a marriage of mind and nature, Agee insists on a divorce. With this revision of terms he undertakes a verbal mimesis (Reed calls it “empiricism with a vengeance” [162]) that fairly vindicates Georg Lukács s claim that modernism followed naturalism in destroying the “hi­ erarchy of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 267–295.
Published: 01 June 2012