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lucy

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2009) 55 (4): 597–617.
Published: 01 December 2009
..., Petrus. On the one hand Petrus purports to be Lucy’s protector, but on the other hand he seems to have been complicit in some way in her gang rape, the massacre of her dogs, and the setting alight of Lurie himself. On Lurie’s best reading, Petrus would, as a fellow farmer, probably assist Lucy in...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2005) 51 (4): 467–490.
Published: 01 December 2005
... easy; it is neither a desirable outcome nor a quietus. David’s coming to animals occurs only after his blithely quasi-philosophical statements on the nature of the animal prove bankrupt once he is forced to encounter real animals in his day-to-day life on his daughter Lucy’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 567–574.
Published: 01 December 2010
...’ complicity with imperialism. Sadly, it is out of print.5 It centers on Lucy Armstrong, who, after suffering the losses of her parents and lover in the war and desiring a fresh start, takes a position as headmistress of a mixed-race school in an unnamed British colony, clearly Jamaica. The novel...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2001) 47 (2): 268–292.
Published: 01 June 2001
... jectivity he creates as it is to such readers and critics today. The episode of George Emerson’s and Lucy Honeychurch’s first kiss in the Italian countryside in A Room with a View provides one of the best examples of such a tableau in Forster’s fiction. This tableau...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2002) 48 (4): 461–486.
Published: 01 December 2002
... loss to her but oh the differ­ ence to me, as Mr Wordsworth remarked. (Letters 272) Joyce’s intention to “pilfer” from Marsden’s forthcoming book is all the more striking because of his allusion to Wordsworth’s poem “Song,” one of the “Lucy” poems.15 The allusion is significant for several...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2002) 48 (2): 215–238.
Published: 01 June 2002
... have articulated them at all: anti-Catholicism is a feature of some of the most celebrated works of English fiction. A century and a half before Leavis, Charlotte Bronte had juxtaposed English empiricism and Catholic superstition in Villette, much to the advantage of the English. When Lucy...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 365–375.
Published: 01 June 2012
... mechanized narration. Spivak offers an especially delicate consideration of Disgrace’s depiction of Lucy, who is refracted by the free indirect discourse medi- ated largely by David Lurie. In light of this mediation, Spivak suggests that literature’s “task” is to provoke a degree of “displacement...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2008) 54 (2): 129–165.
Published: 01 June 2008
... reader of class, proves blind to it—or chooses to overlook it. Consider the most conventional of the novels, A Room with a View, where George and Lucy, a man and woman (unlike Maurice) of the same ethnic­ ity (unlike Where Angels Fear to Tread and A Passage to India) and same class (unlike all the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 168–195.
Published: 01 June 2010
... suffering onto the white female body.19 In Disgrace and Age of Iron Lucy Lurie and Elizabeth Curren bear witness to the sins of the nation through their abject maternity. In Disgrace Lucy is raped 179 Rachel Ann Walsh into maternity and refuses to report the crime, realizing that her...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2008) 54 (4): 493–513.
Published: 01 December 2008
... vigilance, conceived as something both privi­ leged and deprived, harks back to Donne’s “Nocturnal upon S. Lucy’s Day, being the shortest day”— But I am none; nor will my sun renew. You lovers, for whose sake, the lesser sun At this time to the Goat is run To fetch new lust...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 443–473.
Published: 01 December 2006
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2009) 55 (2): 255–261.
Published: 01 June 2009
... circle in the contemporary poetry scene, 259 Alexandra Socarides which, particularly in the work of James Merrill, Charles Simic, Lucie Brock-Broido, and Robert Pinsky, ushers in a return to the dialectic that the book has been describing. This is not necessarily a standard account of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 393–400.
Published: 01 September 2009
.... Cambridge: Cam- bridge UP, 2005. Print. Stallworthy, Jon. “Jon Stallworthy.” Branch-Lines: Edward Thomas and Contempo- rary Poetry. Ed. Guy Cuthbertson and Lucy Newlyn. London: Enith- armon, 2007. Print. Poetry Matters. Tower Poetry. July 2004. 24 Feb. 2009. <httpwww...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2013) 59 (4): 666–673.
Published: 01 December 2013
..., for a sense of community. By contrast, Borinsky explores Cuban Americans through their links to what the critic Gustavo Pérez Firmat has called the “Desi chain”—a term taken from the larger than life bandleader Desi Arnaz in the I Love Lucy show, who serves as a hyperbolic model for the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2003) 49 (3): 277–297.
Published: 01 September 2003
..., Michael. Our Three Selves: The Life of Radclyffe Hall. New York: Morrow, 1985. Bland, Lucy. “Trial by Sexology?: Maud Allan, Salome, and the ‘Cult of the Clitoris’ Case.” Bland and Doan 183—98. Bland, Lucy, and Laura Doan, eds. Sexology in Culture: Labelling Bodies and De­...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2014) 60 (1): 27–58.
Published: 01 March 2014
..., as Lucy Swithin of Between the Acts (1941) might say, Woolf herself returned repeatedly in the first decades of her 27Twentieth-Century Literature 60.1 Spring 2014 27 Mary Jean Corbett career as a professional writer to preoccupations and problems that had exercised two prior...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2000) 46 (3): 346–368.
Published: 01 September 2000
..., to cure the depressed. As Tom explains to epidemiologist Dr. Lucy Pendergast when she asks what symptoms to look for in the exposed population, “Actually, it would be abate­ ment of symptoms—of . . . anxiety, depression, stress, insomnia, suicidal tendencies, chemical dependence.” Lucy’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2002) 48 (4): 363–392.
Published: 01 December 2002
... or an excessive emphasis on public perception and fi­ nancial success.16 The legendary fin-de-siecle Oxford professor Walter Raleigh, the novelist Lucy Clifford, and Woolf’s friend Desmond Mc­ Carthy could all become objects of criticism on this head.17 For Woolf, professional can...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2004) 50 (1): 59–87.
Published: 01 March 2004
... the “narcissistic indulgence of the confessional tradition” (18). Edward Lucie-Smith, writing in 1964 in Critical Quarterly, argues that in contem­ porary “personal” poetry “introversion seems to have triumphed over experiment. The poet gazes with obsessive narcissism at his own reflection...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2010) 56 (3): 371–395.
Published: 01 September 2010
... American culture by association with spirituals, gospel songs, and the blues.7 Indeed, the first poem by an African American (preserved orally until it was written down in 1855) was Lucy Terry’s “Bars Fight,” a ballad about a Native American attack on whites in Deerfield, Massachusetts, in 1746...