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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2002) 48 (3): 292–323.
Published: 01 September 2002
...Richard Danson Brown Copyright © Hofstra University 2002 w “YourThoughts Make Shape Like Snow”: Louis MacNeice on Stephen Spender Richard Danson Brown T h e notion that the left-wing writers o f the 1930s form ed a homog­ enous clique o f interchangeable, mutually...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 349–354.
Published: 01 June 2012
...Donald A. Daiker The Letters of Ernest Hemingway, 1907–1922 , edited by Spanier Sandra and Trogdon Robert W. , Cambridge University Press , 2011 . 431 pages. Copyright © Hofstra University 2012 Review “I sure like to get letters” The Letters of Ernest Hemingway, 1907...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2016) 62 (3): 309–336.
Published: 01 September 2016
... Barry Hines, James Kelman, Irvine Welsh, and David Peace, among others, I trace the destruction of a community-based form of masculinity, focusing on an evolution from earlier, more naturalistic treatments of the era into two divergent strains of late depictions: individualist, fantastic stories like...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2015) 61 (1): 32–62.
Published: 01 March 2015
...Emily J. Orlando This essay examines Harlem Renaissance novelist Nella Larsen’s career-long conversation with the fiction of Edith Wharton. Although Larsen cared little for the suggestion that she “had gone to Mrs. Wharton for her lessons in writing,” likely because the comparison cast doubt on the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 352–372.
Published: 01 September 2015
... and Bruno Latour, it uses Murphy as a means of inquiring into what a literary textual practice founded on a posthumanistic ethics of peace might look like. It locates in Murphy forms of agency and animism that dismantle the human-nonhuman divide and suggest affinities between modernist experimentalism...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2017) 63 (2): 167–190.
Published: 01 June 2017
... possibilities. The particular words Addie repudiates—words like “motherhood” and “sin”—attest to the connection between her philosophical views and her deepest lived frustrations. In turn, Addie’s linguistic philosophy informs those of her children—particularly Dewey Dell, Darl, and Vardaman—all of whom feel...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2017) 63 (3): 267–298.
Published: 01 September 2017
... now understood to be the dialectical image of the object’s withdrawal into being. He learns to accept the promise of the object’s being in the beauty of its necessary withdrawal. The consolation of objects is that they offer artists like Stephen an opening into worlds other than their own, a pathway...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2018) 64 (4): 449–482.
Published: 01 December 2018
... anthropological, heritage—when she represents characters’ undeserved, uncompensated pains. Woolf’s thinking aligns her with Charles Darwin in the natural sciences. Like Darwin, Woolf makes tragic chance inseparable from the theater of life. This essay reads Woolf’s oft-cited rejection of teleological form and her...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2019) 65 (1-2): 167–186.
Published: 01 March 2019
... (post)socialist histories—counters the idea that postsocialism, and especially postsocialist feminism, has remained invisible in the West, where Eastern Europe is assumed to be in the process of becoming like the West rather than representing an inherently different space, with its own set of (post...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2017) 63 (4): 427–450.
Published: 01 December 2017
... the contingent aspects of historical narrative, and on the accidental likenesses whereby nations make the selves up. Copyright © 2017 Hofstra University 2017 Ezra Pound Marianne Moore nation Virginia In Ezra Pound’s well-known account of the ideogrammic method, five words stand for the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2008) 54 (2): vi–viii.
Published: 01 June 2008
..., Culture. Professor Robbins writes: Like other judges of the Andrew J. Kappel Prize before me, I too found all of the finalists for this year’s prize extraordinarily deserv­ ing, if in quite different ways. Serving as judge did not just mean choosing between apples and oranges, but picking...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2000) 46 (2): 193–213.
Published: 01 June 2000
... essentially and frighteningly out of his control Those invasive memories are significant not simply for what they mean to Jim but also for what they reveal about collective attempts to silence and subdue the ghosts of a communal past. My Antonia ultimately suggests that, much like Jim’s more personal...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2008) 54 (1): 31–46.
Published: 01 March 2008
... the water cycle, like all cycles in the novel, is subject to the second law of thermodynamics—in other words, it is a closed system in which entropy increases.2 Like many early twentieth-century writers, it seems, Joyce was influenced by the work of William Thomson (Lord Kelvin), who wrote...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2002) 48 (4): 393–426.
Published: 01 December 2002
.... Although Cather suppressed the economics of tourism in her arti­ cle, on some level she must have recognized that the ruins—which she Twentieth-Century Literature 48.4 Winter 2002 393 Paula Kot represents as preserving “like a fly in amber” (84) a “human record” (85) of an organic relationship to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 233–247.
Published: 01 September 2007
... alternative to modernism. As the essays that Marcus Klein collects in his 1969 volume The American Novel Since World War II suggest, critics in this period were 234 Introduction: After Postmodernism acutely concerned w ith the waning o f modernism, w hich like postmod­ ernism today had...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2010) 56 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 March 2010
... Academy of Medicine has not as yet been able to explain the mysterious condition of hysteria. In women, it acts like a stifling ball rising in the body (I mention only the main symp- tom), while in nervous men it can be the cause of many forms of impotence as well as of a...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2004) 50 (1): 88–105.
Published: 01 March 2004
... hint at the uncertainties and brutalities of love and ask how and why “women and girls have been cast as the custodians of everyday existence” (Smith and Gerstler 1), they obliquely suggest the nervous anxiety of our relations with language as well. Like other postmodern texts...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2005) 51 (3): 373–377.
Published: 01 September 2005
... the 1990s by critics like Harold Bloom, Alvin Kernan, Roger Kimball, and John Ellis, and supported indirectly by related arguments from the pens of Stanley Fish, George Steiner, and David Denby. In the rest of the volume, she evaluates the contributions of these “harridans” to literary...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2006) 52 (2): 237–240.
Published: 01 June 2006
...: University of Iowa Press, 2005.256 pages David Jarraway Few attendees of Linda Hutcheon’s plenary address at the Modernist Studies Association two years ago in Vancouver are likely to forget her rather startling opening apology. The well-known author of works like A Poetics of Postmodernism...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2008) 54 (3): 362–387.
Published: 01 September 2008
... among men— The external world is fitted to the mind; And the creation (by no lower name Can it be called) which they with blended might Accomplish: this is my great argument. (Major Works 198) Like Wordsworth, Frost rejects the idea that nature is merely a linguistic construct...