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lawrence

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2014) 60 (3): 273–304.
Published: 01 September 2014
...Colin Gillis Copyright © Hofstra University 2014 Lawrence’s Bildungsroman and the Science of Sexual Development Lawrence’s Bildungsroman and the Science of Sexual Development Colin Gillis In the 1922 postscript to Sigmund Freud’s “Analysis of a Phobia in a Five-Year-Old Boy...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 287–304.
Published: 01 September 2015
...Derek Ryan This essay argues that a posthumanist ethics is at the heart of modernist aesthetics. Drawing connections between literary ethics and posthumanist theory, it reads D. H. Lawrence’s poem “Snake” and Virginia Woolf ’s essay “The Death of the Moth” as examples of nonanthropocentric ethical...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2018) 64 (1): 25–52.
Published: 01 March 2018
...Jeffrey Lawrence This essay argues that Katherine Anne Porter’s Mexico writings of the 1920s and 1930s played a prominent role in the turn toward a transnational “literature of experience” in the interwar US literary field. Reading the stories “Flowering Judas,” “That Tree,” and “Hacienda...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 330–351.
Published: 01 September 2015
... © Hofstra University 2015 D. H. Lawrence Virginia Woolf modernism anthropomorphism animals As Stephen Ross argues in Modernism and Theory , early twentieth-century modernism and critical theory share an essential narrative structure, one with roots in the Enlightenment: a narrative of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 360–368.
Published: 01 June 2013
... individual writers. G. E. Moore, Sigmund Freud, E. M. Forster, D. H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, and Vita Sackville-West each emerges in Wolfe’s text as possessing a unique understanding of intimacy that would have been unpalatable for the others, but which Wolfe gathers together under the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2016) 62 (3): 345–349.
Published: 01 September 2016
... the politics of optical impersonality in the poems, essays, and fiction of D. H. Lawrence, who seems at times, paradoxically, to recover individuality: “In his essays on painting and psychoanalysis, Lawrence’s desire to recuperate individuality was in clear tension with the destabilizing implications...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2002) 48 (4): 427–460.
Published: 01 December 2002
... scientific oligarchy such as the samurai in A Modern Utopia (1905); Lawrence yearned for the preindustrial theocracy that Don Ramon and Cipriano establish in Mexico in The Plumed Serpent (1926); but Huxley feared a worldwide dystopia governed by sophisticated Western dicta­ tors wielding greater...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2015) 61 (1): 118–127.
Published: 01 March 2015
... oppression in Mexico will leave the book with an excellent understanding of the pertinent basics of each. Query provides close analysis of texts ranging from T. S. Eliot’s Sweeney Agonistes , D. H. Lawrence’s The Plumed Serpent , and the Mexican travelogues of Graham Greene and Evelyn Waugh, to name only a...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2016) 62 (3): 350–357.
Published: 01 September 2016
... contemporary politics his generation was “aware of having renounced values which we continued nevertheless to consider aesthetically superior in Joyce, Yeats, Eliot, Lawrence and Virginia Woolf” ([1967] 1979, 6)—a view that leaves inherited models of art intact. The statement exposes the fact that, as Kohlmann...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2011) 57 (1): 105–113.
Published: 01 March 2011
... of global identity that eludes both the “European national language-based” project of comparative literature and the “Cold War for- mat” of area studies. In their 2007 edited collection Shades of the Planet: American Literature as World Literature, Wai Chee Dimock and Lawrence Buell sought to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): 267–272.
Published: 01 June 2014
... in conception” (ix). This creates what Kelly calls a “clash of sensibilities . . . that often reflects the transition from one historical, intel- lectual, or aesthetic epoch to another.” This formulation builds upon the works of Kenneth Bruffee and Lawrence Buell, who, independent of one...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2017) 63 (2): 228–236.
Published: 01 June 2017
.... F. G. Masterman’s The Condition of England (1909). A later section deals with D. H. Lawrence’s Women in Love (1920), and the closing section comments on Frederic Manning’s The Middle Parts of Fortune (1929) and Rebecca West’s The Return of the Soldier (1918). The discussion of elderly youth...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 115–124.
Published: 01 March 2000
... Drabble, Margaret. See Bowen, Roger Dreiser, Theodore. See Pitofsky Durrell, Lawrence. See Hawthorne Eby, Carl. “Rabbit Stew and Blowing Dorothy’s Bridges: Love, Aggression, and Fetishism in For Whom, the Bell Tolls. ”44.2 (1998): 204—18 Eddins, Dwight. “Ted Hughes and Schopenhauer...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2013) 59 (3): 513–519.
Published: 01 September 2013
... Chinese writing) and Joyce’s “linguistic experiments,” even if Joyce con- structed these parallels “unwittingly” (137). By contrast, the connections between China and Virginia Woolf, as Patricia Lawrence’s Lily Briscoe’s Chinese Eyes: Bloomsbury, Modernism, and China has shown, are more direct and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2012) 58 (3): 495–514.
Published: 01 September 2012
... is a symptom of acculturation, a further set of received images and scenarios. He adopts a primitivist mode familiar to him from canonical modern art: the painting of Picasso; Stravinsky’s music; the writ- ing of Stein, Lawrence, and others. But O’Hara knew that to engage with the primitive...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 269–276.
Published: 01 June 2010
... critical respect without lasting success (Kay Boyle, Frederic Prokosch), some sold successfully while being panned by the intelligentsia (Margaret Mitchell, Laura Hobson), and some achieved both praise and sales yet passed into obscurity nonetheless (Josephine Lawrence). Hutner’s purpose...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2012) 58 (3): 524–531.
Published: 01 September 2012
... writers ranging from Woolf, Eliot, Orwell, and 529 Kristin Bluemel Adorno “in the contexts of audience and market forces, cultures and his- tory, and biography” (851). Departing from Greenberg’s description of Lawrence Rainey’s Modernism: An Anthology (2005) and Peter Nicholls’s Modernisms...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2013) 59 (3): 520–527.
Published: 01 September 2013
... the reader through the major obscenity trials Grove fought in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Glass covers Grove’s most famous cases—against D. H. Lawrence’s Lady Chatterley’s Lover and Henry Miller’s Tropic of Cancer—and also offers insightful analyses on the relation between obscenity and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2002) 48 (1): 100–115.
Published: 01 March 2002
..., conference panels, and literature courses on environmental topics have grown at an exponential rate in the wake of Scott Slovic’s Seeking Awareness, Lawrence Buell’s The Envi­ ronmental Imagination, Cheryll Glotfelty’s The Ecocriticism Reader, and the emergence of the Association for the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2011) 57 (1): 20–33.
Published: 01 March 2011
... impulses (Freud 207-08). John uses the language of Lawrence to articulate his beliefs—grandiose claims about, for example, “the sacred fire of art” that reveals itself through the agen- cies of “suffering, madness, [and] sex”—despite the unfortunate fact that Lawrence’s writing appalls him. He takes...