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jake

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 72–91.
Published: 01 March 2001
...). The following suggests that Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises is much more narrator Jake Barnes’s memory o f war than has been recognized, in terms of landscape, imagery, allusions, and a recurring story of wounding. In this complex, poetic novel, war and wounding constitute a...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2006) 52 (1): 61–91.
Published: 01 March 2006
... tender masculine intimacies, repeated transgressions of this cojonic image. Narrator Jake Barnes is impotent due to a war wound, and he faces intense humiliations at the hands of the sexually peripatetic “new woman,” Lady Brett Ashley. He even takes a beating over her at the hands of the novel’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 75–93.
Published: 01 March 2017
... Signification. The Sun Also Rises presents reductive images of blackness, like the drummer at Zelli’s whom Jake describes as “all teeth and lips” ( Hemingway 1926 [2006] , 69) 4 and whose singing and shouting Hemingway suppresses with ellipses. In the next scene, Bill Gorton describes a Vienna prize fight...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): vii–xi.
Published: 01 June 2011
... thinking about Jake as a wannabe femme or reexamining the semantic complexity of “pretty” in that famous ending: “isn’t it pretty to think so”? 4 The Andrew J. Kappel Prize in Literary Criticism, named for the late critic and esteemed deputy editor of  Twentieth-Century Literature, is...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2000) 46 (2): 193–213.
Published: 01 June 2000
.... Certain characters never will be domesticated: Otto and Jake, for example. They are continually outside of the domestic, with no wives or children of their own, temporary inhabitants of other people’s houses. Wick Cutter, through his seduction and rape of his hired girls, is a threat to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2016) 62 (2): 197–222.
Published: 01 June 2016
... short stories), Jake Barnes in The Sun Also Rises (1926), and Frederic Henry in A Farewell to Arms (1929). Drawing from both these strands of scholarship, this article proposes a return to Catherine Barkley, the controversial female protagonist of Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms , 6 whose...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 349–354.
Published: 01 June 2012
... Our Time (1925) and in The Sun Also Rises (1926), the novel that marked Hemingway’s first commercial success and that many readers believe to be his supreme achievement. In one of the most touching scenes in that novel, Jake Barnes says to Lady Ashley, simply and truly, “Oh, Brett, I love...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 663–687.
Published: 01 December 2012
... characters in Viña Delmar’s Bad Girl (1928), Josephine Herbst’s The Executioner Waits (1934), and Ruth McKenney’s Jake Home (1943), stress women’s right to make their own decisions about their bodies: “She’d have to come to a decision by herself. A man would have a hell of a nerve to tell her to go...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2003) 49 (1): 82–102.
Published: 01 March 2003
... Mystery of Paris, Engel’s novel is in fact a novel about Ernest Hemingway or, more accurately, two novels about Hem­ ingway, since Wad appears in Murder in Montparnasse both as the Hem­ ingway who is working on his “Spanish novel” and as the Hemingway [Jake Barnes] who is drinking his way through...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2018) 64 (3): 295–316.
Published: 01 September 2018
... hotel room. It was known as “Jake.” She would take rouge and paint her face all over a most startling red. Then I must take eye-shadow and paint myself blue. Blue Jake and Red Jake would then chase each other into closets, across beds, into bath rooms, with our sheet-robes trailing around us and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 559–566.
Published: 01 December 2010
... young son. Hemingway conveys that same sense of excitement when Bill Gorton says to Jake Barnes, “We’re going trout- fishing. We’re going trout-fishing in the Irati River, and we’re going to get tight now at lunch on the wine of the country, and then take a swell bus ride” (SAR 102). Not only...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 341–348.
Published: 01 June 2012
... the feminizing effects of modernity, symbolized most obvi- ously in Jake Barnes’s literal castration, and as an expression of “beneficently feminine” artisanal creativity for which Hemingway, as a writer, yearns. Yet Forter argues that The Sun ultimately associates bullfighting with “death...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 357–377.
Published: 01 September 2009
... the lower depths of life in Marseille (qtd. in Til- lery 108). 9. Home to Harlem and Banana Bottom, McKay’s other two novels, follow more traditional developmental plots. Both are focalized through a single protagonist (though Ray does figure in Jake’s experiences in Home to Harlem) and recount...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2008) 54 (3): 307–338.
Published: 01 September 2008
... impotence recall Hemingway’s Jake Barnes), do not pack the same emotional punch. Not only does Todd’s disillusionment not entail a loss of political idealism (of his motives for going to war,Todd writes only that he “enlisted impulsively,” “wasn’t pa­ triotic,” and “had no feelings at all about the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2013) 59 (3): 465–493.
Published: 01 September 2013
... deaf friend Antonapoulos, reads the lips of English speakers, and writes grammatical English notes—as being without language. “Mick Kelly, Doctor Benedict Copeland, and Jake Blount each construct a Self-Other relationship,” Charles Bradshaw writes, “with someone incapable of language—the deaf...