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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2002) 48 (3): 348–361.
Published: 01 September 2002
... views on her project. As a dog story, Flush belongs to a subgenre o f the literary animal story. The first successful English novel w ith an animal protagonist is Anna Sewell’s Black Beauty (1877). Sewell deploys the conventions o f Vic­ torian first-person narrative in...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2002) 48 (3): 292–323.
Published: 01 September 2002
... refine understanding o f M acN eice’s poetics at this pivotal stage in his career. § M acNeice and Spender were never altogether at ease w ith one another. Contemporaries at Oxford, fellow aspiring poets w ho jointly edited the 1929 Oxford Poetry, their accounts o f each other are...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 248–272.
Published: 01 September 2007
... ith a city, for pain” (15). In the paranoid imaginings o f his protagonist Oedipa Maas, traffic is an endless automated flow; the freeway exists less to facilitate human movement than to feed a city that craves only numbing, drug-induced happiness. Oedipa is litde more...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 394–405.
Published: 01 September 2007
... listen to some straight talk about a topic others have overcomplicated.” Zunshine implies that her job is to discuss the simple truth that real readers naturally like good stories. It’s hard to argue w ith her as I w rite this review in the week after the final H arry Potter book was...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 327–344.
Published: 01 September 2007
..., supplanting the defensive figure o f the suburb as deliberately remote from urban concerns w ith a new model o f the digi­ tal network, within which access to inform ation becomes equalized and normalized. Whereas the suburban landscapes o f John Cheever or John Twentieth-Century Literature...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2002) 48 (3): 324–347.
Published: 01 September 2002
... imperial age that helped construct the possibilities for both these novels o f unspeakable love. T he textual space within which M au­ rice exists is revealed, in this reading, to be a result o f the educational practices o f a period that sought to align national interests w ith an...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 414–420.
Published: 01 September 2007
... inspiration over the past three- quarters o f a century. Once a laurelled star o f literary criticism, Eliot has more recently been cast by postmodernism as the reactionary gatekeeper o f a masculinist, elitist, and monolithic modernism. W ith the incorpora­ tion o f gender theory, feminism...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 298–326.
Published: 01 September 2007
... Literature 53.3 Fall 2007 298 Roth, DeLillo, Banks, Peck, and the Postmodern Aesthetics of Vocation count o f the trials o f a poor young writer, discharged from the army and teaching freshman composition at the University o f Chicago in 1956, it concludes w ith a gnomic leap into literary fancy...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2002) 48 (3): 239–263.
Published: 01 September 2002
... in contem po­ rary ethnography’s anxious alliance w ith prose fiction. For at stake in both is the production and interpretation o f narrative. Insofar as ethno­ graphic experiments in storytelling are asked to correct the protocols of an outdated universalism and its untenable...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 273–297.
Published: 01 September 2007
... work, and to their “simultaneous validity” [288—89 self-referentiality, and metafiction have been imposed on literary texts in particular, w ith the result that postm odern fiction, and “postmodernity” in general, have been understood in terms o f banality, depthlessness, cynicism...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 406–413.
Published: 01 September 2007
.... Franco’s Ethnic American Literature and David Cowart’s Trailing Clouds take up this question in their analysis o f the diverse corpus o f contemporary American literary voices and literatures. Dean J. Franco’s study begins w ith a chapter titled “The Jew W ho G ot Away,” in w hich he asks...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 345–370.
Published: 01 September 2007
... research” (111). The combination, then, o f an intense focus on form w ith a preoccupa­ tion w ith ethnicity leads to a “high cultural pluralism” (117)— a phrase that describes an impressive array o f authors from Jews like Philip R o th and Saul Bellow to Native Americans like N...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 233–247.
Published: 01 September 2007
... decline has three interrelated problems. First and perhaps most obviously, it perpetuates a hierarchical view o f culture that confuses aesthetic questions about literary form w ith sociological Twentieth-Century Literature 53.3 Fall 2007 233 Andrew Hoberek ones about the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2002) 48 (3): 264–291.
Published: 01 September 2002
... novel ends in part 3, “Last Transit,” with their return to England, D ixon’s death, and M ason’s eventual relo­ cation to America. The tale is told by the Rev. Wicks Cherrycoke, who was a m em ber o f the expedition and w ho has come to stay (and stay and stay) w ith family on...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 371–393.
Published: 01 September 2007
... distrust in recent years. W hat endings mean, and why writers embrace them or avoid them, depends in part on how contingent existence feels and how public discourse and constructions o f history deal w ith that feeling. As a result, events that reawaken a sense of contingency and challenge...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 367–390.
Published: 01 December 2006
.... {Weather 15) Twentieth-Century Literature 52.4 Winter 2006 367 Malcolm Woodland W ith a mixture of defiance and regret, Strand acknowledges that he would rather “be me,” even though being me means being a lesser poet than Wordsworth and, therefore, having something “to worry...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 443–473.
Published: 01 December 2006
..., newly exported from the Malpais Indian Reservation, attends a feely called Three Weeks in a Helicopter. Billed as “AN ALL-SUPER-SING­ ING, SYNTHETIC-TALKING, CO LOU RED , STEREOSCOPIC FEELY W ITH SYNCHRONIZED SCENT-ORGAN ACCOMPANI­ M EN T” (167), a parody of the 1920s cinema slogan, “All...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2007) 53 (1): 79–87.
Published: 01 March 2007
... reader. W ith this ideal of echoes and new connections in mind, what new perspectives does the collection enable? As Quinn’s notes demonstrate, each reader is likely to hear different echoes and follow different points of connection as they make their way through the drafts. Each...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2006) 52 (4): 413–442.
Published: 01 December 2006
... my idea of a great lady on a white horse” (140). Stan is quick to pick up on her identification with the figure. Misquoting the Danderine jingle, he renders it: “W ith rings on her fingers and bebs on her toes, And she shab make mischief wherever she goes.” The substitution of mischief for...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2002) 48 (1): 22–49.
Published: 01 March 2002
... the discriminating traveler w ith service unsurpassed in every d e ta il Specially equipped Dam is but one example.” The cliff Packard Eight...