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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 180–198.
Published: 01 June 2011
...Benjamin Bateman Copyright © Hofstra University 2011 Benjamin Bateman Beyond Interpellation: Forster, Connection, and the Queer Invitation Benjamin Bateman I shall then suggest that ideology “acts” or “functions” in such a way that it “recruits” subjects among the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 49–74.
Published: 01 March 2017
... consideration of how the illusion of transparency invites connection to other times, places, and people—and just as readily forecloses it. Copyright © Hofstra University 2017 Material history Mrs. Dalloway “A Sketch of the Past” Virginia Woolf visual culture Shop windows, car windows, house windows, ground...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2003) 49 (3): 421.
Published: 01 September 2003
... more than three years and is doing research on Conrad. The award consists of a $100 hono­ rarium, one year’s membership in the Joseph Conrad Society of America, and a complimentary invitation to the annual Conrad Society dinner held during the Modern Language Association...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2014) 60 (3): 414–422.
Published: 01 September 2014
...Michael LeMahieu Obscure Invitations: The Persistence of the Author in Twentieth-Century American Literature , by Widiss Benjamin , Stanford University Press , 2011 . 208 pages. Copyright © Hofstra University 2014 Michael LeMahieu The Afterlives of the Author Obscure Invitations: The...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2003) 49 (3): 420.
Published: 01 September 2003
... Copyright © Hofstra University 2003 Announcement Call for papers We invite essays and/or proposals for an edited collection on intercon­ nections between Philosemitism and Antisemitism in twentieth-century American and British literature and culture. This volume will focus on the use of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): vi–viii.
Published: 01 June 2014
... inviting Nabokov to “migrate” into his text in the very form of a textual detail, the essay argues, Sebald is invoking a vision of knowledge as totality that haunts his characters and his text. But there is more. In staging an encounter between Sebald and Nabokov, the essay opens the way to...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2011) 57 (1): 54–69.
Published: 01 March 2011
... hospitality. As with many of the terms Derrida addresses, it contains an aporetic un/Heimlich split: the “hostility” of the community protecting its borders is intimately linked with the “hospitality” opening its gates to an invited guest. This intimate connection is the more ir- reconcilable for being...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2002) 48 (2): v–vii.
Published: 01 June 2002
... professors have elected and can scarcely bewail, it does make the prospect of reading more essays on subjects that may not be of interest less than alluring. So it was with some hesitation that I accepted the invitation to act as judge for the Andrew J. Kappel Prize in Literary Criticism...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2013) 59 (4): 674–680.
Published: 01 December 2013
..., with words both precise and austere, Lispector, shortly before passing away, says in her last recorded interview (1977) that she is speaking from her grave. She feels dead in the hiatus between books. The moment preserved on the screen is eerie. Her almost expressionless face invites us to feel...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2013) 59 (4): 681–689.
Published: 01 December 2013
.... “This reflexivity,” Arthur writes, “this insistence on acknowledging his own and his reader’s position in the production of knowledge about poverty is the heart of the book’s regional cosmpolitanism” (3). (Arthur’s lack of discussion of Agee’s book as fiction invites questions about its generic...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2001) 47 (2): 268–292.
Published: 01 June 2001
... the gendered object of the male gaze from female to male, and by disrupting the progress of his narratives at important moments during which the reader is invited to gaze on a tableau in which the male body is the central focal point, Forster invented a kind of narration...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2015) 61 (2): 272–279.
Published: 01 June 2015
... autobiographical, and explicitly so, inviting the biographer to simply and tightly lace together the life and the work. But a great many of Merrill’s lyrics are also intimidatingly hermetic, more so even than Lowell’s, perhaps. Both poets moved from writing more “closed” poems to more “open” ones as they matured...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2018) 64 (4): 413–448.
Published: 01 December 2018
... )—all the notes don’t say seems to invite readers to import their outside interests. 13 Even as a graduate student, Eliot had been preoccupied with questions of interpretation. In a paper written in 1914, assessing the ethical systems of Thomas Hill Green and Henry Sedgwick, Eliot suggests that both...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2018) 64 (3): 295–316.
Published: 01 September 2018
... quality of Hurston’s childhood performances on this makeshift stage induced passersby to pause or invite her to “go a piece of the way” with them. The young Hurston accepts “small silver” from the white visitors to hear her “speak pieces” and “dance the parse-me-la” but notes that these monetary exchanges...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2004) 50 (1): 88–105.
Published: 01 March 2004
..., particularly those influenced by the Language movement, Gerstler’s prose poems foreground the play of lan­ guage and invite the reader to participate in the construction of mean­ ings that are always contingent. These poems invite the reader to recall, however vaguely, the precursory cultural texts that...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2007) 53 (1): 74–78.
Published: 01 March 2007
... journalistic inanity, they locate responsibility, and also hope for the public sphere, differendy. Macaulay’s satirical and sometimes self-mocking voice often questioned the premises 76 Review of the journalistic assignments she undertook, inviting readers “to share her ironic stance” in...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): vii–xi.
Published: 01 June 2011
... identities start to levitate. By putting gender into play, sex also starts to differ from itself, to sway. And in this sway- ing we are invited to revisit each of Hemingway’s novels to see his characters’ gender performances as acts of aesthetic as well as political practice. After...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2007) 53 (1): 79–87.
Published: 01 March 2007
... responsibil­ ity: “this time let us translate / the labels more carefully.” The tour of the provincial museum invites a kind of aesthetic contemplation that Bishop prized, and we might follow her lead as we engage her own “provincial museum.” Quinn’s notes to the collection are exemplary in this...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2015) 61 (1): 118–127.
Published: 01 March 2015
... than other ritual forms from some of the most important British and Irish writers of the interwar era” (3). The scope of Query’s book testifies to this fact. His conclusion invites readers back to the possibilities of other ritual forms in investigating how authors negotiate the idea of Europe. The...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2012) 58 (3): 515–523.
Published: 01 September 2012
... Saloman’s values), I begin with one that does not concern Woolf, but rather the essay genre, as opposed to the novel. Essays, says Saloman, are open-ended—they ruminate in unplanned ways and invite readers to reach their own conclusions—whereas novels are closed, guiding readers toward conclusions...