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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2002) 48 (1): 22–49.
Published: 01 March 2002
...Caroline M. Woidat Copyright © Hofstra University 2002 w The Indian-Detour inWilla Cather’s Southwestern Novels Caroline M . Woidat You think of us only when your voice wants for roots, when you have sat back on your heels and become...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): 251–258.
Published: 01 June 2014
...Karen Leick Anti-Nazi Modernism: The Challenges of Resistance in 1930s Fiction , by Spiro Mia , Northwestern University Press , 2013 . 308 pages. Migrant Modernism: Postwar London and the West Indian Novel , by Brown J. Dillon , University of Virginia Press , 2013 . 246 pages...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2004) 50 (2): 107–140.
Published: 01 June 2004
... also of our current conceptions of hybridity. Maud Diver’s Candles in the Wind is representa­ tive of a body of colonial fiction that constructs its images of Eurasians as being in between Indian and British culture, negating in the process the possibility of their existence as Anglo-Indian.2...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2008) 54 (3): 388–395.
Published: 01 September 2008
..., there is much that is unsatisfactory inTreuer’s presentation. His jumpy introductory sketch of the place of “Indians” in American literature draws on without crediting D. H. Lawrence’s observation that the “Indian” haunts American litera­ ture. He blurs the troubling ubiquity of “Indians” dead or...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 92–113.
Published: 01 March 2001
... one volume. A Twentiety-Century Literature *47.1 • Spring 2001 • 92 popular college textbook, it has prompted many readers to treat the sto­ ries as stages of a novel. That is the general approach taken here. “Indian Camp,” with the devastating trauma o f its Caesarian section and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2015) 61 (4): 511–518.
Published: 01 December 2015
... Nationalism in India , works on two levels. First, it is an analysis of important Indian literary works of the 1930s, centering on Mulk Raj Anand’s Untouchable (1936), Raja Rao’s Kanthapura (1938), and Ahmed Ali’s Twilight in Delhi (1940). Second, and perhaps more important, the book tackles the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2004) 50 (2): v–viii.
Published: 01 June 2004
... ones, assuming the importance of each to the other. It combines the historical record of Eurasians in India (mixed-race people of British and Indian heritage) during the raj with a close reading of a representative popular novel by Maud Diver to question how race and gender work in the context...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2009) 55 (1): 1–35.
Published: 01 March 2009
... Twentieth-Century Literature 55.1 Spring 2009 1 Aaron Easdey healer into a politician, initiating a personal metamorphosis that culmi­ nates in his becoming G. Ramsay Muir, M. B. E., a West Indian envoy operating in England and a shameless British mimic man (220Nineteen forty-six” is heralded in...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2000) 46 (2): 214–237.
Published: 01 June 2000
... 215 TWENTIETH CENTURY LITERATURE two forces are an undertone of Indian pessimism and a persistent lack of generosity in one’s estimation of blacks. Throughout his political fiction— including, along with The Mimic Men (1967), In a Free State (1971), Guerrillas (1975), and A Bend in the River...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 245–253.
Published: 01 June 2010
... though it was driven by the political agenda of religious and nationalist leaders, it was facilitated, ironically enough, by British scholars and administrators who sought to show that Indian civilization was at least as old as that of the Greeks or Romans, its intellectual traditions as rich and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2018) 64 (2): 259–264.
Published: 01 June 2018
... this extended literary-philological moment, in which often-overlapping bodies of writing came to acquire, through a process of historicization, distinct personalities as ‘literature’ along national lines” (97). The creation of Indian national literature was inherently connected with the formation of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 470–491.
Published: 01 December 2000
... her in the English 471 TWENTIETH CENTURY LITERATURE club: “Indians are not allowed into the Chandrapore Club even as guests” (41). Significantly, he is later able to extend an invitation to Adela and Mrs. Moore to “be Moslems together” on the train...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2001) 47 (3): 374–390.
Published: 01 September 2001
... as I am, something prickles in me when I see the word Ashanti as with the word Warwickshire both baptising this hybrid, this West Indian. —Walcott, “What the Twilight Says” (10) D erek Walcott, winner of the Nobel Prize for literature in 1992, has...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2015) 61 (3): 305–329.
Published: 01 September 2015
... those we have, though none will ever be total, decisive, or complete, articulates the novel’s ethical dimension. The first example comes when Adela breaks off her “understanding” with Ronny. Having spoken without thinking while visiting Fielding, Aziz, and some other Indians, Adela has just discovered...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 596–618.
Published: 01 December 2001
... of migrants from the Indian subcontinent to Britain.” In the first case migration is a cate­ gory far removed from history, and in the second it is inextricably a his­ torical event. The status of such statements as truth claims is hardly the issue. The point, rather, is to understand...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2016) 62 (2): 119–144.
Published: 01 June 2016
... Indian government, and Dow Chemical have all refused to recognize the presence or health effects of MIC in Bhopal’s water supply, despite a wealth of evidence. Key elements of what was once considered a mutually beneficial project for economic development, the factory, the chemicals, and the people of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): 169–196.
Published: 01 June 2014
... engaged with the epistemological and moral indeterminacies of its immediate social and cultural environments. The fictions I read closely here—“The Indian Uprising,” “Report,” and “The President,” all of which were collected in Unspeakable Practices, Unnatural Acts, published in the tumultuous...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 569–595.
Published: 01 December 2001
... national identity exists. He interviews Indians of different backgrounds and eco­ nomic statuses, and a crowd confronts him and asks “How can a coun­ try that never previously existed become independent? What does it mean to call this crowd of separate national histories, conflicting cultures, and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2015) 61 (2): 232–263.
Published: 01 June 2015
... chapter, Salim offers an overview of the complexities of the world of the Indian Ocean and its demographic entanglements, among Indian, Arab, island, and mainland groups, and a sketch of the rise and fall of the Omani Sultanate and its caravan routes and inland settlements and domains. But in doing so...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 545–568.
Published: 01 December 2001
... allowed, the Indian talent for non-stop self-regeneration. This is why the narrative constantly throws up new stories, why it “teems.”The form—multitudinous, hinting at the infinite possibilities of the country—is the optimistic counterweight to Saleem’s personal tragedy...