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ibsen

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 396–404.
Published: 01 December 2000
...Elinor Fuchs Copyright © Hofstra University 2001 The Apocalyptic Ibsen: When We Dead Awaken E l in o r Fu c h s And four great beasts came up from the sea The second, like a bear. It was raised up on one side, and had three ribs in its mouth...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2005) 51 (1): 114–122.
Published: 01 March 2005
... Fowles.John. See Lynch Friel, Brian. See Moloney Fuchs, Elinor. “The Apocalyptic Ibsen: When We Dead Awaken." 46.4 (2000): 396-404 CjXenter, Robert. “Toward a Theory of Rhetoric: Ralph Ellison, Kenneth Burke, and the Problem of Modernism.” 48.2 (2002): 191-214 Gersder, Amy. See Axelrod...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2014) 60 (1): 27–58.
Published: 01 March 2014
... fiction and drama, even though such work also ostensibly rejected the “feminine prudery” and “sentimentalism” of an earlier Victorian generation. In addition to reading Wuthering Heights, Rachel Vinrace acts out plays by Henrik Ibsen “for days at a time . . . ; then it would be Meredith’s turn...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2008) 54 (1): 105–114.
Published: 01 March 2008
... front of modernity: “If anything, he [Shaw] felt himself honored by the arbitrary ban imposed upon his comedies as upon Ibsen’s Ghosts, Tolstoy’s The Power of Darkness and Wilde’s Salomé” (152). Joyce’s description of the controversy surrounding the production of the play and the subsequent...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 720–727.
Published: 01 December 2012
... of a particular time and place than in individual, revelatory experience,” Ulysses has as its political aims revealing “the dead- ening effects of life in Dublin” and puncturing a “deluded romanticism” (39). Enamored early of what he took to be Henrik Ibsen’s “unmeditated mimesis” (39...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 387–395.
Published: 01 December 2000
... Ttions of the just-completed century. Elinor Fuchs shows how Henrik Ibsen’s final play, When We Dead Awaken, portrays a characteristically modern ten­ sion between ironic scrutiny and apocalyptic dread and desire, serving “as a prologue to the twentieth century’s proliferation of apocalyptic...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2011) 57 (1): 1–8.
Published: 01 March 2011
... Julian Murphet and leave the audience more perplexed and unsettled than before” (7), as Edward Said once observed of Ibsen’s last plays. Are these works, then, throwbacks to an earlier and more overtly “modernist” phase of textual production, a kind of homeless late modern enterprise...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2008) 54 (2): 166–192.
Published: 01 June 2008
... contradiction will help us understand Hill’s poetics of elegiac anxiety, where an ethical response to the dead risks im­ plication in their sacrifice and ethical guilt seeks intelligibility as faith. In act 1 of Hill’s version of Henrik Ibsen’s Brand, Einar reproaches Brand’s religious zeal with a...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2006) 52 (3): 330–346.
Published: 01 September 2006
... Miller’s play, Mamet’s work takes the salesman as the embodiment of that naturalist preoccupation with the conflict between “beast and soul” that has been an obsession of modern drama at least since Ibsen. In American Buffalo this obsession informs Don’s discussion of luck, skill, and talent...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 39–71.
Published: 01 March 2001
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2002) 48 (4): 363–392.
Published: 01 December 2002
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2009) 55 (2): 145–174.
Published: 01 June 2009
... Western world,” Toomer writes ironically, whose thoughts have been shaped and moulded by the po- ets from Plato (Goethe, Ibsen, etc.) to Whitman suddenly roll on our backs with our face towards China and the Chinese. Charmed by their pictorial, suggestive loveliness we no...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2009) 55 (3): 287–321.
Published: 01 September 2009