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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2002) 48 (4): 393–426.
Published: 01 December 2002
...Paula Kot Copyright © Hofstra University 2002 Ml Speculation,Tourism, and The Professor’s House Paula Kot In the summer of 1915 Willa Cather visited Mesa Verde National Park, probably to gather information for what eventually became “Tom Out- land’s Story,” book 2 of The...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 462–492.
Published: 01 December 2010
...Yi-Ping Ong Copyright © Hofstra University 2010 Yi-Ping Ong The Language of Advertising and the Novel: Naipaul’s A House for Mr. Biswas Yi-Ping Ong Modernity in Trinidad, then, turns out to be the extreme suscep- tibility of people who are unsure of themselves and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2000) 46 (2): 193–213.
Published: 01 June 2000
...Lisa Marie Lucenti Copyright © Hofstra University 2000 Willa Cather’s My Antonia: Haunting the Houses of Memory Lisa Marie Lucenti emory is much more than a recurrent or pervasive theme in Willa Cather’s fiction; remembrance is the very essence of Cather’s...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2015) 61 (4): 460–483.
Published: 01 December 2015
...Jeannie Im The role of landscape in Elizabeth Bowen’s Irish novels has been overshadowed by the critical emphasis on her representations of the Anglo-Irish big house. In contrast to this critical trend, this article argues that Bowen’s Irish landscapes stage questions of national identity and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2000) 46 (1): 56–77.
Published: 01 March 2000
... ideal, marked out by publications (tour books, maps, and histories), by visitors (tourists, school groups, and ram­ blers) , and by plaqued houses and museums. This essay examines how Night and Day takes as its setting the literary haunts and homes of London, a setting of fiction that Woolf sees...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): 222–242.
Published: 01 June 2014
... trope of the house, and its implicit com- mentary on the home and the homeland demonstrates that, no matter how exhaustively we fortify our domestic spaces, the political will always intervene and will often do so violently.1 Narratives of political innocence and American exceptionalism, integral...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2016) 62 (2): 223–230.
Published: 01 June 2016
... understanding of space as both material and metaphor preserves Caribbean history, both what is visible to the West above the sea and Kamau Brathwaite’s invisible unity beneath it. Chapter two, “A House of One’s Own: Individual and Communal Spaces in the Caribbean ‘Yard Novel’” explains one of the most...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 283–308.
Published: 01 June 2013
... shoes reflects her critical interest in literary tourism, specifically in writers’ house museums. InNight and Day and in non-fictional responses to museological practices, she questions the use of shoes as personal memorial objects, and I argue that in these texts shoes function both as an...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 196–231.
Published: 01 June 2013
...- side an increasingly poor and steadily graying population.4  The image of the suburb as an exclusive haven of white privilege no longer pertains. Further, these communities now contend with congestion, crumbling infrastructure, insufficient affordable housing and healthcare, schools ill...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2010) 56 (3): 318–340.
Published: 01 September 2010
... escape for me after all. She must rely on marriage to carry her somewhere else. Till it did, she stayed bound to a gone moment, like a stopped clock with hands silently pointing at an hour it can not be. —Elizabeth Bowen, The House in Paris (133–34...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2012) 58 (1): 1–25.
Published: 01 March 2012
... about the mundane houses characters live in than about those characters themselves, neglecting the interior defining qualities of characters in favor of superficial descriptions that reveal too little. “He is trying to make us imagine for him,” she tells us in “Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown” (1924...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2000) 46 (3): 328–345.
Published: 01 September 2000
... observed around him, where a friend’s farm could be commandeered by the Ministry of Town and Coun­ try Planning and appropriated for subdivisions and public housing.2 His awareness of his own contradictory position could only be made more acute by his fond exercise in family biography: as a young...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2011) 57 (2): 180–198.
Published: 01 June 2011
... their families, to see a house in no danger of disappearing soon. With reason on her side, then, Margaret declines the invitation: “Later on I should love it . . . but it’s hardly the weather for such an expedition, and we ought to start when we’re fresh. Isn’t the house shut up, too?” (77...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2012) 58 (1): 60–89.
Published: 01 March 2012
..., however, there is surprisingly little reference to shopping in Wharton’s autobiography,1 though her fiction demonstrates her familiarity with New York’s famous shopping districts, where characters like Lily Bart in The House of Mirth (1905), Undine Spragg in The Custom of the Country (1913), and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 92–113.
Published: 01 March 2001
... a house of indeterminate form from his military experience: the nights the river ran so much wider and stiller than it should and outside of Fossalta there was a low house painted yellow with wil­ lows all around it and a low stable and there was a canal, and he had...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2007) 53 (2): 125–152.
Published: 01 June 2007
... instance, includes a patient explanation of the ontological distinction between the subjects of fiction on one hand and documentary on the other: In a novel, a house or person has his meaning, his existence, en­ tirely through the writer. Here, a house or a person has only the 129 Ella...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2016) 62 (3): 247–270.
Published: 01 September 2016
...-Irish culture in the Free State, in which nearly everyone is afflicted by age or ailment. Mr. Knott’s “terminal morbidity,” for example, comments on the apparent demise of the foundational genre of Anglo-Irish literature, the big-house novel ( Moynahan 1995 , 224). In Watt , Mr Knott’s big house...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2014) 60 (4): 423–454.
Published: 01 December 2014
... tow. Unable to carry it all up the lane to Charleston farmhouse, though, he paused to hide a parcel in the hedge near the gate (Bell, “Cézanne Then, with his more manageable burden, he began to walk toward the house, where, upon his arrival, he declared to the great surprise of its inhabitants...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2001) 47 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 March 2001
... and disturb arrangements makes Beloved’s violence— so pow­ erful that the whole house quakes at one point—suggestive of a meta­ phorical dissatisfaction with the established order (Cixous and Clément 154, 156). Even when she returns in the physical form of a young woman, Be­ loved...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 582–605.
Published: 01 December 2012
...- hal’s realism for its representation of “each character . . . as a product of particular material and social conditions, as being thus or thus because of the calling he pursued or the house he lived in . . . or the society he wanted to get into . . . or the acre of ground he coveted, or the...