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homosexual

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2002) 48 (3): 324–347.
Published: 01 September 2002
...Quentin Bailey Copyright © Hofstra University 2002 m Heroes and Homosexuals: Education and Empire in E. M. Forster Quentin Bailey H e had brought out the man in Alec, and now it was Alec’s turn to bring out the hero in him .They must live outside class...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2018) 64 (4): 387–412.
Published: 01 December 2018
... as a mode of fostering and preserving nonnormative voices, converting the privacy imposed on the homosexual into the conditions for creating queer worlds. Gossip concomitantly provides Merrill with a model of poetic self-performance that at once pushes against and embraces New Critical ideals of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2013) 59 (4): 596–618.
Published: 01 December 2013
... both Vidal and Baldwin center their novels around what was, at mid-twentieth century, a new social type: the masculine gay man. Historian George Chauncey argues that “the hetero-homosexual binarism, the sexual regime now hegemonic in American culture”—pre- suming the gender of one’s sexual...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2008) 54 (2): 129–165.
Published: 01 June 2008
... on E. M. Forster. Truman wanted to know why it was that Lionel had ignored Forster’s homosexuality. Now this was not only a bold ques­ tion to put at the top of his shrill voice in a very crowded car in those days [sic]. I remember having very mixed feelings. One: wishing...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 343–350.
Published: 01 June 2013
...Jesse Matz Monopolizing the Master: Henry James and the Politics of Modern Literary Scholarship , by Anesko Michael , Stanford University Press , 2012 . 248 pages. Oscar’s Shadow: Wilde, Homosexuality, and Modern Ireland , by Walshe Éibhear , Cork University Press , 2011...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2001) 47 (2): 268–292.
Published: 01 June 2001
... theory has emerged, scholars have begun to explore the ways writers have found to express the homosexual perspec­ tive in works written before the open acknowledgment of homosexual­ ity became acceptable. Ed Cohen has used the term “ec-centric” to describe men of the late...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2010) 56 (2): 131–167.
Published: 01 June 2010
... reduction of desire to sexuality and the concept of sexual identity itself—a concept just gaining currency in the twenties and thirties. Her literary portrayals of bisexual desire thus challenged the heterosexual/homosexual identity dyad. Reading bisexuality in Woolf’s work as an epistemological and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 493–529.
Published: 01 December 2010
... the psychiatric evalua- tions imposed upon homosexuals during the 1950s, the “Examination” routine in Naked Lunch suggests how interrogation and confession facili- tated not only the surveillance and exposure of sexual deviancy, but also its regulation and containment, contributing to what...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2008) 54 (2): 217–246.
Published: 01 June 2008
... ished and unfinished novels, manuscripts of novels, and The Life to Come Twentieth-Century Literature 54.2 Summer 2008 217 Ambreen Hai (Forster’s posthumously published short stories with explicit homosexual content), did not include The Celestial Omnibus.4 Perhaps this is because these...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2009) 55 (2): 175–208.
Published: 01 June 2009
...—Flaubert’s Parrot becomes a remarkably queer bird, one that intro- duces homosexuality, pedophilia, bestiality, promiscuity, and necrophilia as desires that cannot be repressed, marginalized, labeled, or categorized as perverse because of their metaphorical equivalency to the sanctioned sexual desire...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2008) 54 (2): vi–viii.
Published: 01 June 2008
... straightforward: the 21-year-old Capote meets the older, already well-known Trillings on a train and briefly dis­ cusses with them E. M. Forster’s homosexuality and why it didn’t appear in Lionel’s book on Forster. The essay then goes on to analyze how this episode is remembered by Capote (in various let­...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2012) 58 (4): 702–708.
Published: 01 December 2012
... of Penner’s study is its attention to the very visible ways that American culture has been historically conceived in terms of gender taxonomies. Named after Senator Joseph McCarthy’s public rebuke of “homosexual and affluent left-wingers who supported the New Deal” (246) in the 1950s, Pinks...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): 251–258.
Published: 01 June 2014
... Jews, women, and homosexuals, the three oppressed groups Spiro discusses. Spiro’s first chapter, “Spectacular Nazism and Subversive Performance,” is an historical survey of the role of Nazi propaganda. Here, Spiro asks questions about the efficacy of using difficult, experimental fiction for...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2017) 63 (1): 75–93.
Published: 01 March 2017
... white, in order to remove any possible racial interference” (1989, 223) with the story’s treatment of homosexuality. But even in Baldwin’s all-white Paris, it will not prove quite that simple to separate race from sexuality. The representation of homosexuality in The Sun Also Rises might well also...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2005) 51 (4): 391–413.
Published: 01 December 2005
... silence. As critic David Weir has argued, there is also appar­ ently a “homoerotic complication” (221) at play in Stephen’s friendship with Mulligan, imbuing Mulligan’s digressions on Yeatsian love with a strong element of what Eve Sedgwick has called “homosexual panic” for Stephen...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2003) 49 (3): 277–297.
Published: 01 September 2003
... points out in his discussion of the transition from a model of “sexual inversion” to one of “homosexuality” during the first several decades of the twentieth century, “Freud’s American followers and other non-Freudian psychia­ trists continued to mix his radically mental explanation of...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2013) 59 (2): 377–384.
Published: 01 June 2013
... chapter, “The Zemblan Who Came in from the Cold: Nabokov’s Cold War,” Belletto offers an interesting reading of Nabokov’s early novel, Pale Fire (1962), arguing that in the book the concept of chance connects the controversies associated with the Cold War and the perception of homosexuality. Pale...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2000) 46 (4): 492–512.
Published: 01 December 2000
... desire exists elsewhere, in class oppression. By defini­ tion, members of subordinated groups can be demoralized, but they are 503 TWENTIETH CENTURY LITERATURE incapable of being subjects of nonreproductive desires. Engels cannot think homosexuality without...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2002) 48 (2): 150–173.
Published: 01 June 2002
... obliquity were Merrill’s worst ob­ stacles” (“James Merrill” 206). Merrill’s early poetry does indeed reveal the “urgency to reveal the untellable,” and the impulse continues into his mature work. The urgen­ cy came from the desire to write freely of his life as a homosexual, which he resisted for...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2012) 58 (3): 495–514.
Published: 01 September 2012
... “turn the other way” and “answer to another name.” He tells his father not to call to him because he knows that his homosexuality pushes him beyond the realms of normative au- thority—that he “couldn’t do” what his father says. He seeks an alternative paternal figure or Absolute Subject, one that...