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homeland

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Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2014) 60 (2): 222–242.
Published: 01 June 2014
...Dale Pattison © 2015 by Hofstra University 2014 Dale Pattison Writing Home: Domestic Space, Narrative Production, and the Homeland in Roth’s American Pastoral Dale Pattison On September 18, 2002, as part of the Lannan Foundation’s literary awards ceremony, author and activist...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2019) 65 (1-2): 97–120.
Published: 01 March 2019
... Here (2005). The main protagonists of both novels are transnational mediators whose migrant identities are reshaped at the intersection of Yugoslavia and the United States, and they offer provocative perspectives on women’s interlinked lives in homeland and host communities. While Tesich fictionalizes...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2017) 63 (4): 451–474.
Published: 01 December 2017
... that her reading might be considered a fresh response to the shifty rhetoric of foreign policy and to the plight of her imaginary homeland, Eire, in particular. The essay centers on Moore’s rendering of “Spenser’s Ireland,” a lyric whose complex textual condition congealed in the aftermath of Pearl...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2019) 65 (1-2): 145–166.
Published: 01 March 2019
... the spread of Russian corruption abroad through a focus on immigrants and their visitors. Bezmozgis’s and Litman’s characters are prevented from going back to former Soviet Republics by their intense dislike of the moral corruption in their former homeland. In Absurdistan (2006), by contrast...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 431–443.
Published: 01 December 2001
..., rather than interrupt, the chorus on the street. While most of his earlier political essays (for instance, those collected in Imaginary Homelands) come from a recognizable liberal-left position, these new articles are surpris­ ingly indistinguishable, in their tone and argument, from many main­...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 596–618.
Published: 01 December 2001
..., along with some essays from Imaginary Homelands, I situate Rushdie, literarily and politically, in the immigrant communities to whose experiences he gives fictional flesh. This situation, of necessity, involves an unfair absence of attention to his cultural and literary con­ nections to the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2008) 54 (3): 339–361.
Published: 01 September 2008
... for a mimic man like Saladin is to return to roots and rediscover his Indian self. Gikandi, for one, critiques the way the novel suggests that a return to the homeland is desirable or even possible (223-24). The fierceness of Rushdie’s satire of the colonial mimic man may reflect...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 545–568.
Published: 01 December 2001
.... —Salman Rushdie (Imaginary Homelands 16) E tver since Salman Rushdie described the Indian “national longing for form” in his novel Midnight’s Children (359), questions of form have been a central topic for Rushdie scholarship. Form, or, to use a slightly more specific term, genre, is so central...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2010) 56 (3): 318–340.
Published: 01 September 2010
...- nificantly different from at least one key component of cosmopolitanism as it has been considered from postcolonial and minority transnational perspectives. That component is the need to recognize new associations beyond the homeland while also accounting for the unresolved status of one’s prior...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2006) 52 (1): 96–105.
Published: 01 March 2006
... School for Love, set in 1943-era Jerusalem, which was then the capital of British Mandatory Palestine. Lassner notes, “the crowded space of 1943 Jerusalem may be home to colonized Arabs and an ancient homeland for Jews fleeing Hitler’s death camps, but it also encapsulates the imperial batde...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2007) 53 (1): 67–73.
Published: 01 March 2007
... longer accessible. As Wirth-Nesher elaborates in her final chapter, while Jews have been positioned on the multicultural map over the past two decades as white Euro-Americans, such a defini­ tion does not reflect the fact that “their countries of origin are not their cultural homeland,” and...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2007) 53 (3): 406–413.
Published: 01 September 2007
... features includes (1) fragmentary narration, (2) inserted folktales from the old country, (3) learning English as a second language, (4) anthropological point o f view by narrators, (5) topos o f an unlivable homeland, (6) psychological doubling, (7) eating disorders in wom ens...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2012) 58 (2): 355–364.
Published: 01 June 2012
... homeland” (39). But she does not attempt to tease out the validity of this best of both worlds philosophy and thus leaves some of the ethical implications of such a winnowing process unexplored. What exactly is “the best of exile and 361 Kalyan Nadiminti of a lost homeland” (39)? How do we...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2010) 56 (4): 545–550.
Published: 01 December 2010
...-again” Christianity from fundamentalist conservatives, Wilson argues, Dylan “aimed his poetry at cleansing the good of the accretions that had come to encumber visions of redemption or democratic possibility in his declining and Mammon- worshipping homeland” (172). Dylan turns conversion...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 December 2001) 47 (4): 467–509.
Published: 01 December 2001
...” (Imaginary Homelands 224). Griffiths has noted Rushdie’s enthusiasm for adventure narratives such as Alice in Wonderland, Sinbad’s adventures in The Thou­ sand and One Nights, and The Wizard of Oz. But in “On Adventure,” Rush­ die goes on to question whether such Houdiniism is appropriate for...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2011) 57 (1): 34–53.
Published: 01 March 2011
... mother coun- try’s library to discover writing about his homeland. John’s eureka mo- ment is, therefore, a reclaiming of his national past in discourse, taking it back from the imperial eye and replacing this vision with his native look. If treated correctly, his text might come “alive” with the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2019) 65 (1-2): 1–22.
Published: 01 March 2019
... homeland that had failed them . . . and assimilation was the goal they desired for their US-born offspring” (681). She posits that, in contrast to American Jewish literature, which according to her is partially modeled after traditional Anglo-American writing, the “Literature of New Arrival” employs new...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 June 2002) 48 (2): 174–190.
Published: 01 June 2002
... queen” (Collected Plays 88). When Gonne acted the role in its 1902 debut, she was Ireland. Six years later, as the dark lady of “No SecondTroy,” she was arguably still Ireland, but a very different Ire­ land. As we shall see, the distance between these two visions of the po­ et’s homeland can...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 March 2011) 57 (1): 20–33.
Published: 01 March 2011
... against their Victorian forebears. Most of all, though, the modernist creed has taught him to hate his homeland. It is striking that for someone as consumed by the high-modernist canon as John is, he has no serious interest in James Joyce, an artist dedi- cated to documenting life outside the...
Journal Article
Twentieth-Century Literature (1 September 2006) 52 (3): 352–359.
Published: 01 September 2006
... conversations with the deity. The pope would seem to be making a serious political and theological statement that ought to make good Christians protecting our homeland security by any means necessary sit up and listen. At its furthest reach it is a refutation of the militant violence upon...